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Dymond r/c linear spindle drive servo

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Old 01-24-2014, 08:33 PM
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Steve Westphal
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Default Dymond r/c linear spindle drive servo

I am pondering purchasing a couple of Dymonds 1.5 gram linear servos. Has anyone used these before? They would work great in our small warbirds. Would love to hear from anyone who has used these.
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Old 01-24-2014, 08:44 PM
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I'd like to hear from someone with experience with them also. I've been fondling and admiring the servos on my Vapor and Mini-vapor, and while they are tiny and cute, they also have a fair bit of backlash and I just am not convinced - yet - they're up to a glow engine. So far I might be brave enough to try some HS35HB's on an .010/.020 model without 3D control surfaces. But heck, maybe a science experiment is in order.
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Old 01-28-2014, 08:21 PM
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Steve Westphal
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I would try a couple if I could find a review on them. Sure are tiny.
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Old 02-02-2014, 01:08 PM
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The weight of the servos is a very small contribution to the total weight, as I see it. There isn't much gain in going from 2-3 servos of 2.5-3.5gram each, to the linear ones.

The lightest (glow powered) planes I have will end-up around 100-120g, mainly dependent on the of choice engine and RX battery. Saving 5grams (?) and risking failure is not a good idea...
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Old 02-02-2014, 02:03 PM
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I'm even hesitant about the HS-35's, but I think they may be good candidates for .010 - .020 stuff. I think I may build something cheap, expendable and sorta sporty with a Sure Start (with modestly sized free moving surfaces) and try them in that - for the purpose of a stress test. They tout the fact they have metal-Karbonite gears, but it doesn't matter what they're made of if they're too tiny for the job..
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Old 02-02-2014, 02:46 PM
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I have seldom found the gears are the point of failure. I have carefully tested alll the servos that have failed me in 049 use. Each time the motor was the failure. Each time it was a motor winding wire that broke between the commutator and the coil windings. This wire, if pulled too tight and soldered during assembly, will vibrate, harden, and break. If one was truly concerned one would open the motor and carefully encapsulate that area with epoxy or hot glue and reassemble before use. That is a lot of work. So I went with HS81 or HS82, in hopes that the wires were a bit heavier and would last longer. I also take pains to mount using rubber grommets. Don't screw them down so tight the rubber looses all flex. Balance the prop carefully.
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