"1/2 A" & "1/8 A" airplanes These are the small ones...more popular now than ever.

Strip ailerons

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Old 02-24-2018, 09:37 AM
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Walther
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Default Strip ailerons

I am looking for hardware for 1/16 wire to install strip ailerons on a HOB Bonanza. But I can't seem to find any.
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Old 02-24-2018, 02:36 PM
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Easy to make your own. Some 3/32 brass tubing and 1/16 wire is all you need. For a horn, flatten the brass tubing and drill a hole in it before soldering to the wire. You can also use brass tubing instead of the nyrod depicted in the drawing. No need to install nyrod into the aileron, just drill a hole and glue the wire into the surface.
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Old 02-24-2018, 03:44 PM
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I stopped using those linkages after having some serious flutter issues. They make great torsion springs so they induce flutter if you have a fast plane. Some of the micro servos out there work quite well and you could one in each wing.
That said, the Bonanza would look better with nothing sticking out of the bottom of the wing. Will look through my stock to see if I have any of the fittings.
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Old 02-24-2018, 04:00 PM
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I use the above pictured home made aileron horns in my 1/2A pylon racers without flutter issues. If you are having flutter problems I suggest the problem is likely found elsewhere. Perhaps over sized ailerons, wood that is too thin or too soft (not stiff enough) or too wide of a gap between the surface and the wing?
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Old 02-25-2018, 08:20 AM
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Thanks much for the replies.

Tom.
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Old 02-25-2018, 08:44 AM
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Walther..... If these parts would help you, send me a PM with your address and I will get them in the mail this week. These are 1/16 inch which I guess are now a bit rare. (Tower does have the 3/32' version) You are certainly welcome to them, no charge. I have not (yet) found the nylon bits but you could use some brass rod or nyrod for the bearing surface, and ball end joints for the connection to the servo.
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Old 02-26-2018, 08:12 AM
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Originally Posted by thailazer View Post
Walther..... If these parts would help you, send me a PM with your address and I will get them in the mail this week. These are 1/16 inch which I guess are now a bit rare. (Tower does have the 3/32' version) You are certainly welcome to them, no charge. I have not (yet) found the nylon bits but you could use some brass rod or nyrod for the bearing surface, and ball end joints for the connection to the servo.
Thanks very much for the offer but I have made these, it is the connectors that I need.

Tom.
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Old 02-26-2018, 03:00 PM
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Tom:

Flatten the last 1/2 inch or so of a 1 inch piece of 3/32 brass tubing, leave the other end round, then drill 1 or more holes through the flattened end of the tubing. Finally, solder the still round end of the tubing onto the wire to serve as your horn. Then you connect a clevice to the flattend tubing with the clevice pin passing through the hole you drilled.
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Old 10-02-2018, 05:32 AM
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i'll wager to say that allot of the flutter problems come from the hole size drilled in the control horn for the pushrod clevis. most drill bits drill larger than their size and add to that a little wobble from a hand held drill and you can end up with a fairly loose hole where there should be little to no play. for drilling those control horn holes, get several sizes of undersized number or letter drill bits and by drilling try holes in a piece of scrap approximately the same thickness and material as the control horn,, find the exact size that fits the clevis pin or pushrod snug......it will make a difference.
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Old 10-03-2018, 03:55 AM
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Please do not drill holes as "r ward" has suggested. If you want precision hole, start with one size smaller then use the size wanted! There are even reamers that will give you a hole that is within .0005" of what you want.
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Old 10-03-2018, 05:05 AM
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number and letter drills come in sizes that are only a thousandth or a few ten-thousandths of an inch increase in diameter. between number bits and letter bits it is possible to have a range of drilled holes for just about any given diameter pin you might have. you have to first drill a "try hole" in a piece of scrap, to get the diameter of the hole that is smaller than what you want and then use bits that give you the exact size you're looking for. no drill bit drills exactly the size hole stated on the bit,....usually, they all drill holes slightly larger than the size stated. reamers will work as g-rock says, so will my method...... you are essentially using the number and letter bits as reamers. they can be spun with a pin vise with your fingers once the first hole is drilled. number and letter bits are much easier to come by than precision number and letter size reamers and the reamers are allot more expensive. with a reamer you are not guaranteed the size hole stated on the reamer either,( if you spin the reamer by hand, wobble will increase the size hole they make, at that point you are at the same point as using drill bits,......so why spend the money for reamers .... there is just as much possibility that you might need to buy another reamer or two, to get that precise fit.
we can go on and on about which method works better,....they both work,.... I know my method works fine, with potentially less expense.
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Old 10-03-2018, 08:56 AM
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Upon reading "r-ward's" post more closely, I agree with most of what he has stated. Cannot remember the last time I hand drilled. I have always had access to a drill press and clamps. And now have access to a small machine shop. What was missing in "r-ward's" post is the clamping of items before drilling. Clamping will in most cases, save your finger, and, result in a less oversize hole.
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Old 10-04-2018, 05:39 AM
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although you are correct that clamping a piece in a drill press will give more accurately drilled holes, not everybody that reads this has a drill press. I have been a Union carpenter/millwright all my adult working life. I have a shop full of tools for both wood and metal fab and have been using tools of this nature since I was a 10 year old . as a 7th grader, I built a grandfather's clock ,....wooden movement and all.... in woodworking shop at school.... and in several instances, I had to explain what the blueprints were showing to my shop instructor, because he was lost. one of my first jobs as 17 year old teenager was running a crankshaft grinder and all the other machines involved in rebuilding engines at an automotive machine shop .....so I know all about precision....I know what a "ten-thousandth" is.....and I know that a decent job.... in this case,.... can be done without a vice, a drill press or clamps. some things are simply left out of posts because it is understood that someone participating in a thread like this is at least familiar with rudimentary processes like using a clamp when you drill something..... however,...something the size of a control horn may not be clamp able, given that the average r/c hobbyist doesn't have a shop full of tools and machinery to use. not having a drill press does not mean this cannot be done successfully,....it means more attention to accuracy and proper use of the tool you are using must be done. why make people feel that they cannot do it because they don't have a shop full of machinery ?
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Old 10-04-2018, 09:57 AM
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r-ward, you win. By
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Old 10-05-2018, 05:40 PM
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Ball Links and you'll never clevis again.

Ball Links

BTW, you can order this directly from DuBro. Prices are in line with the mail order joints and DuBro seems to always have it in stock.
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Old 10-06-2018, 05:12 AM
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what's so great about ball links ?. to me all they do is allow shortcuts to sloppy alignment of control linkage.
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Old 10-07-2018, 08:53 AM
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Whatever the method of attachment is, slop is slop, something that needs to be at a minimum. By alignment, do you mean control surface travel, or alignment of linkage between servo and control surface?
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Old 10-08-2018, 03:43 AM
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Originally Posted by r ward View Post
what's so great about ball links ?. to me all they do is allow shortcuts to sloppy alignment of control linkage.
Well then maybe you should go back to Z bends.

I also do sailboats. Any idea how much force is applied to a rudder on one of these? You're dealing with water now, not air. I have a 60 inch long boat with a rudder the size of your hand. Ball links all the way!
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Old 10-08-2018, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Appowner View Post
Well then maybe you should go back to Z bends.

I also do sailboats. Any idea how much force is applied to a rudder on one of these? You're dealing with water now, not air. I have a 60 inch long boat with a rudder the size of your hand. Ball links all the way!
I used to own a 1938 vintage Star Sloop and worked for a wooden boat builder, here in Wisconsin,..... yes, I know how much pressure there is on a rudder, first hand. with a properly sized hole in the horn and good linkage geometry, a z-bend can be slop less as well. personally never had any trouble with z-bends, but ihave seen some awfull linkage geometry because ball end links allow relatively large deviations in proper alignment.
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Old 10-08-2018, 02:43 PM
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OH and by the way .....that star sloop was 276 inches long,..... not 45......
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Old 01-15-2019, 04:23 PM
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Here's how I do mine. Using a servo horn works great to make it adjustable.

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