AMA Discussions Discuss AMA policies, decisions & any other AMA related topics here.

Intersting article

Reply

Old 01-14-2005, 04:14 PM
  #1  
Jbolt
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Mountain View, CA
Posts: 116
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Intersting article

Looks like not much has changed in the last 13 years.

[link=http://pages.zdnet.com/venicerc/id46.html]AMAs History and future[/link]
Jbolt is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2005, 09:01 PM
  #2  
J_R
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Corona, CA,
Posts: 4,444
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Intersting article

Anyone that clicked the link and decided the article was too long, or did not read it for any reason needs to reconsider. It takes a few minutes to read... but its worth it.

Just my opinion, but this may be the most interesting reading posted in this forum in a very long time.
J_R is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2005, 10:12 PM
  #3  
bdavison
Senior Member
My Feedback: (1)
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Warner Robins, GA
Posts: 3,360
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Intersting article

There are a few things which I agree with and disagree with in that article.

The general overall impression I got was that the AMA should focus its efforts on bringing the technical aspects of model aviation to the flying public. Things such as building skills, electronics, aerodynamics and such.

While these are important things for every modeler to involve him/herself with, I do not think that this should be the sole focus of the AMA. This is a very poor way of doing things by excluding those that dont have interests in these aspects of model aviation.

We live in an age where many young modelers are wanting instant gratification. They want to fly, but without having to learn why, or how it flys. Its unfortunate, but true. To refuse to cater to these types of entry level flyers is a BIG mistake. This type of mindset is precisely what is killing the AMA.

When the AMA tells a entry level pilot that he must learn to be a aviation rocket scientist before he can go have fun, he's going to take him/herself elsewhere, where there is less required effort. The beginning pilots just dont have the patience to start into the hobby this way.

Instead what needs to happen is that we offer incredible enthusiasm for new flyers, inviting them in with open arms, let them have some fun, encourage them to have fun while flying. But while their having fun, give them insight into the technical aspects. This way they dont lose interest in the hobby, but learn while having fun.

For instance, you have a new flyer that comes to the field and wants to get into model aviation. Instead of just saying ok, this is my plane, this is how it flys, if you wanna fly, go to the hobby shop and buy a plane , then join the club and come fly. We need to peak his interest, but offer guidance as well.

Tell him about the plane, explain how they are built, explain how the plane flys and basic aerodynamics, offer guidance into what type of plane is best for a beginner, offer to teach him how to fly his first plane, offer to give guidance on how to build a plane, encourage him to learn how to build a plane, offer guidance on safety, encourage him to join the AMA, tell him about competition flying, ask him questions on what type of flying he would like to try (control line, electric, glow, gas, scale, jets, etc),

Many flyers use excuses like "I dont have the time to teach a new flyer", "Its more effort than I want to put out", "He will only do it wrong" etc.

My only suggestion is MAKE TIME,GIVE EFFORT, TEACH HIM THE RIGHT WAY. If you dont, the decline of the quality of the hobby will continue. All is NOT lost. We have got to get off our sofas and start getting this hobby on the right track. If your not willing to make this sacrifice for the hobby, dont complain when things dont go your way.

I am telling everyone on here, I offer my services to any of you. I will teach you to fly, I will teach you anything I can. Im not an expert builder or expert pilot, but Im here, and Im willing to do my best. At least Im willing to make the sacrifice and try. Its the least I can do.

I sincerly believe in the merits of our hobby, and how it not only serves as a great hobby, but a great education and learning experience that goes far beyond just a weekend fun time.
bdavison is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2005, 10:45 PM
  #4  
abel_pranger
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: St Augustine, FL,
Posts: 2,644
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Intersting article

ORIGINAL: bdavison

There are a few things which I agree with and disagree with in that article.
<snip>

bdavison-

I really like your attitude. Now I'm going to read the article you have commented on...and form my own opinion.

Abel
abel_pranger is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2005, 11:21 PM
  #5  
Hossfly
 
Hossfly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: New Caney, TX
Posts: 6,130
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Intersting article

There are a few things which I agree with and disagree with in that article.
//snip//
We live in an age where many young modelers are wanting instant gratification. They want to fly, but without having to learn why, or how it flys. Its unfortunate, but true. To refuse to cater to these types of entry level flyers is a BIG mistake. This type of mindset is precisely what is killing the AMA.
My bet is that everyone agrees with that first statement.

As you say in the next statement it is unfortunately true however that is the problem in itself. Somewhere there has to be a learning of responsibility and self discipline. I don't care to "cater" to them as much as teach them the better way to approach the hobby-sport. In my personal case, I don't want the unlearned show-offs on my field with a missile under their command, and that command not being overly stable.

Overall, George Meyers' article is one very good historical review, although a significant amount of important detail is not there. An example is the paragraph concerning Billy Mitchell, GM could have mentioned the court-martial of Mitchell by those too ignorant, too satisfied in their own small world, and too arrogant, pompous, and without vision for that which is unpopular.

GM does illustrate something that, IMO, is of the utmost importance and has real merit.

>>>>>>>>>>>>> George Meyers: (Emphasis added)
Model aviators, as a class of people, must become better organized to survive. AMA must learn how to organize effectively and must teach organization to our members. AMA must learn to make better use of the talents in our Chartered clubs. The need has always existed, but seldom satisfied.

Flying sites are disappearing. Lose the Flying Sites and you lose the hobby. AMA must take an active part in Flying Site acquisition and protection. My crystal ball says that model aviation must generate large, well developed and intensively used flying sites. That means sharing the facilities with many people. Land is too valuable to leave it vacant, just so a few people can fly model airplanes over it for a couple of hours per year. Look at all the shopping centers that used to be airports. Consider how many formerly public beaches now have hotels squatting on them. Look at all the campgrounds that the Boy Scouts "used to own." Guess what will happen to our present flying sites, if AMA fails to take vigorous action to protect them.
<<<<<<<<<<<<

While I don't see AMA as the builder of flying sites, I do envision an AMA that would lead a thrust into promoting model aviation to all through constant amounts of publicity heaped on all forms of news media. A program that would make the sport-hobby as well known as any sport. This is where flying site acquisition by those local Chartered Clubs and/or AMA Chapters will be enhanced.

The problem with that vision is simply because so many people getting into this sport "....just want to fly a few years, move on and avoid all the politics." Throughout their young lives they have never had to produce because their school teachers teach them from day 1 that the government will take care of them.
That is why I am concerning myself only with those that want to be serious about their hobby.
Hossfly is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2005, 04:53 PM
  #6  
iflyj3
Senior Member
My Feedback: (7)
 
iflyj3's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Paris, KY
Posts: 1,405
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Intersting article

Interesting article and very well written. However I think I found a small flaw when it said "AMA bought Insurance, starting January, 1956, which helped modelers obtain and hold flying sites." I believe the year was 1965 and not 1956. Probably a transposition error.
iflyj3 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2005, 09:02 PM
  #7  
FlyinTiger
My Feedback: (45)
 
FlyinTiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Penn Valley, CA
Posts: 792
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Intersting article

The article is very interesting. In an ideal world where people actually cared about leaving things better than they found them this philosophy would work. Right now I am just hoping that when all the dust settles the dedicated few will be enough to keep things going (ref. Hossfly's statement). Those of us who are involved in our clubs and in recruiting new pilots need to help stifle that "we like our club the way it is and don't need to change or get new members" attitude that is not in line with the spirit of AMA!
FlyinTiger is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2005, 09:01 PM
  #8  
50+AirYears
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Irmo, SC OH
Posts: 1,628
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Intersting article

we like our club the way it is and don't need to change or get new members" attitude that is not in line with the spirit of AMA!
It's also not an attitude for long term survival. When I joined my current club, there was a limit of 75. I was #74 for that year. We later raised the limit to 100, then 125, then temporarily lifted the limit to let members of a nearby club join so they could have a place to fly till they found a new field. We never restored the limit.
We are principally a sport group. We've only had a couple people into any kind of competition. We have had a couple members who did have some sponsorship though.
We fly almost anything from small electrics through helicopters to large scale. Some of us fly control line and some sport Free Flight at the field when it's not crowded.
When somebody comes up with something new, most of us are interested in seeing it work. A lot of us wish there were something we could do to set up our runway so that turbines could use it.
There is only one thing we refuse to accept: Would be pilots who refuse to fly safely.
By the way, we are of course one of those 90/10 clubs... or maybe 85/15.
50+AirYears is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2005, 10:51 AM
  #9  
crownvic
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Mc Cleary, WA
Posts: 665
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Intersting article

bdavison I disagree with you on the end off your thoughts. For alot of flyers this is a weekend thing and not a way off life!

JMO
Lonnie
crownvic is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2005, 01:59 PM
  #10  
Montague
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Laurel, MD,
Posts: 4,987
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Intersting article

I just skimmed the article and the responses. And I don't know anything about the author or any connection to AMA.

However, when talking about the AMA "pushing" education, it's important to remember that the AMA is registered with the government as a 501(c)(3) tax excempt educational organization. That means that they have to prove that they are out to educate people about something. In this case, model aviation or aviation in general, I think. If they don't, and the IRS decides they aren't, they can get hit for back taxes in a big kinda way. As I understand it, at least someone in the AMA thinks they are walking a bit close to the line as it is. The museam helps them claim (c)(3). As do other things. I'm fairly sure the "focus on education" column in MA is pretty much manditory for this. It's possible that MA or something going to every member is also part of this, though I'm not sure. (ie, it might be part of why the AMA doesn't have a "no magazine" full membership at reduced price)

Many clubs are set up as 501(c)(7) social organizations. This allows you to not have to try to teach anything to anyone, just hang out and do your thing. IMHO, it fits most local clubs better.

Note: I'm not an accountant or tax lawyer or anything like that. I've had some small experience working with some 501(c)(3) and (c)(7) groups in the past, including doing the books of a small 501(c)(7) for a few years as a volunteer, so I've seen the real-world impact of that difference in some specific cases, but I don't claim to be an expert.
Montague is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service