Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

View Poll Results: A poll

Voters
66. You may not vote on this poll
  • Class B

    4 6.06%
  • Class C

    4 6.06%
  • Class D

    5 7.58%
  • Class E

    9 13.64%
  • Class G

    28 42.42%
  • Do not know

    16 24.24%
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 98

  1. #1
    phlpsfrnk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
    Posts
    731
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    Do you know what class airspace you fly in at your local flying field? If you fly at multiple fields in different airspace select both types.
    It is not possible to write in such a way that cannot be misinterpreted by a reader determined to do so.

  2. #2
    Silent-AV8R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    4,850
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    This may help:

    http://www.allstar.fiu.edu/aero/airspace.htm

    And if you know how to read them here's source to see FAA sectionals online and locate your field:
    http://skyvector.com/#47-14-3-4287-3487

    My main field is under the Class C airspace for John Wayne/Orange County Airport in Class G airspace.

    I have flown at other sites around the LA/Orange County area that are in Class C and Class D airspace as well.
    Team Futaba - RClipos.com

  3. #3
    phlpsfrnk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
    Posts
    731
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    Silent-AV8R
    Thanks for the links. I should have thought to include them.

    Regards
    Frank
    It is not possible to write in such a way that cannot be misinterpreted by a reader determined to do so.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Park Rapids, MN
    Posts
    2,989
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    We are a little more than three miles away from our local airport which is a non-tower (uncontrolled) airport. We fly in Class G airspace. I thought it was E; but, once again was wrong.
    Plane crazy!

  5. #5
    P-51B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    An Iceburg in, ANTARCTICA
    Posts
    6,747
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?


    ORIGINAL: phlpsfrnk

    Do you know what class airspace you fly in at your local flying field? If you fly at multiple fields in different airspace select both types.

    Out of curiosity, why are you asking this question?

    Looking at your number of posts and join date, I am wondering if you may work for the FAA or are in some way involved with the rules committee that wants to regulate RC aircraft?


  6. #6
    Rafael23cc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Junction City, KS
    Posts
    2,771
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?


    ORIGINAL: phlpsfrnk

    Do you know what class airspace you fly in at your local flying field? If you fly at multiple fields in different airspace select both types.

    If you knew the regulations, you would know that we do not fly IN the regulated airspace. We fly below it. So I do not see the point of this question or the inclusion of this question in the AMA forum.

    You are either gullible, or you are fishing.......

    Rafael
    Keep your eyes on the sky but your feet on the ground!
    Team Heliproz.com / AMA # 8109

  7. #7
    phlpsfrnk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
    Posts
    731
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    ORIGINAL: P-51B


    ORIGINAL: phlpsfrnk

    Do you know what class airspace you fly in at your local flying field? If you fly at multiple fields in different airspace select both types.

    Out of curiosity, why are you asking this question?

    Looking at your number of posts and join date, I am wondering if you may work for the FAA or are in some way involved with the rules committee that wants to regulate RC aircraft?

    P-51B
    My only affiliation with the FAA is that I hold a private pilot certificate. I’m curious how many people know/understand the airspace they fly in.

    Regards
    Frank
    It is not possible to write in such a way that cannot be misinterpreted by a reader determined to do so.

  8. #8
    phlpsfrnk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
    Posts
    731
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?


    ORIGINAL: Rafael23cc


    ORIGINAL: phlpsfrnk

    Do you know what class airspace you fly in at your local flying field? If you fly at multiple fields in different airspace select both types.

    If you knew the regulations, you would know that we do not fly IN the regulated airspace. We fly below it. So I do not see the point of this question or the inclusion of this question in the AMA forum.

    You are either gullible, or you are fishing.......

    Rafael
    Rafael,
    I know the regulations. I am not β€œgullible” or phishing. If you do not think you are flying in the NAS you are mistaken. It’s a simple question, you are either flying in an area of one of the listed airspaces or you are flying indoors.

    Regards
    Frank
    It is not possible to write in such a way that cannot be misinterpreted by a reader determined to do so.

  9. #9
    Sport_Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Acworth, GA
    Posts
    13,719
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    If you knew the regulations, you would know that we do not fly IN the regulated airspace.
    That is incorrect. Some AMA fields are withen the controled airspace belonging to a nearby airport.
    Glow Head Brotherhood #15

  10. #10
    Sport_Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Acworth, GA
    Posts
    13,719
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    I am not β€œgullible” or phishing. If you do not think you are flying in the NAS you are mistaken.
    It is at least debatable that class G airspace is part of the NAS.
    Glow Head Brotherhood #15

  11. #11
    phlpsfrnk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
    Posts
    731
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?


    ORIGINAL: Sport_Pilot

    I am not β€œgullible” or phishing. If you do not think you are flying in the NAS you are mistaken.
    It is at least debatable that class G airspace is part of the NAS.
    Sport_Pilot,
    It is not "debatable". The FAA created the National Airspace System (NAS) airspace classifications. Class G airspace is part of the NAS. Please refer to the links in post #2.

    Regards
    Frank
    It is not possible to write in such a way that cannot be misinterpreted by a reader determined to do so.

  12. #12
    Sport_Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Acworth, GA
    Posts
    13,719
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    Class G airspace is part of the NAS.
    Have you wondered why the FAA calls this uncontrolled airspace?
    Glow Head Brotherhood #15

  13. #13
    phlpsfrnk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
    Posts
    731
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?


    ORIGINAL: Sport_Pilot

    Class G airspace is part of the NAS.
    Have you wondered why the FAA calls this uncontrolled airspace?
    Sport_Pilot,
    Uncontrolled means that IFR flights cannot fly there, VFR flight rules apply. Uncontrolled does not mean unregulated.

    Regards
    Frank
    It is not possible to write in such a way that cannot be misinterpreted by a reader determined to do so.

  14. #14
    Sport_Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Acworth, GA
    Posts
    13,719
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    Uncontrolled does not mean unregulated.
    There is no regulation that applies to uncontrolled airspace. Other than aircraft and how it is flown which applies everywhere. And obstructions to navigable airspace. The law that established the FAA established this.

    However, I am reminded that, to be more specific the FAA has rule of all navigable airspace which is less than 500 feet in rural areas, and 1000 feet in populated areas, but this is most of class g.
    Glow Head Brotherhood #15

  15. #15
    phlpsfrnk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
    Posts
    731
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?


    ORIGINAL: Sport_Pilot

    Uncontrolled does not mean unregulated.
    There is no regulation that applies to uncontrolled airspace. Other than aircraft and how it is flown which applies everywhere. And obstructions to navigable airspace. The law that established the FAA established this.

    However, I am reminded that, to be more specific the FAA has rule of all navigable airspace which is less than 500 feet in rural areas, and 1000 feet in populated areas, but this is most of class g.
    Sport_Pilot,
    I'm not sure of the point you're trying to make here. The FAA National Airspce System (NAS) classifications start at the surface and extend to FL 600. Standing on the surface you are either in Class B, C, D, E or G Airspace, depending on where you are in the country.

    Regards
    Frank
    It is not possible to write in such a way that cannot be misinterpreted by a reader determined to do so.

  16. #16
    Sport_Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Acworth, GA
    Posts
    13,719
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    The FAA National Airspce System (NAS) classifications start at the surface and extend to FL 600.
    But that does not mean that the FAA has authority of airspace just over the surface.

    From USC 49.
    40102. Definitions

    (32) β€œnavigable airspace” means airspace above the minimum altitudes of flight prescribed by regulations under this subpart and subpart III of this part, including airspace needed to ensure safety in the takeoff and landing of aircraft.


    Β§ 40103. Sovereignty and use of airspace


    (b) Use of Airspace.β€”
    (1) The Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration shall develop plans and policy for the use of the navigable airspace and assign by regulation or order the use of the airspace necessary to ensure the safety of aircraft and the efficient use of airspace. The Administrator may modify or revoke an assignment when required in the public interest.
    Glow Head Brotherhood #15

  17. #17
    Rafael23cc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Junction City, KS
    Posts
    2,771
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?


    ORIGINAL: phlpsfrnk

    Rafael,
    I know the regulations. I am not β€œgullible” or phishing. If you do not think you are flying in the NAS you are mistaken. It’s a simple question, you are either flying in an area of one of the listed airspaces or you are flying indoors.

    Regards
    Frank
    Ok, since it seems that you "cleared" that part, what is the relationship of this with the AMA?

    Rafael
    Keep your eyes on the sky but your feet on the ground!
    Team Heliproz.com / AMA # 8109

  18. #18
    phlpsfrnk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
    Posts
    731
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?


    ORIGINAL: Sport_Pilot

    The FAA National Airspce System (NAS) classifications start at the surface and extend to FL 600.
    But that does not mean that the FAA has authority of airspace just over the surface.

    From USC 49.
    40102. Definitions

    (32) β€œnavigable airspace” means airspace above the minimum altitudes of flight prescribed by regulations under this subpart and subpart III of this part, including airspace needed to ensure safety in the takeoff and landing of aircraft.


    Β§ 40103. Sovereignty and use of airspace


    (b) Use of Airspace.β€”
    (1) The Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration shall develop plans and policy for the use of the navigable airspace and assign by regulation or order the use of the airspace necessary to ensure the safety of aircraft and the efficient use of airspace. The Administrator may modify or revoke an assignment when required in the public interest.
    I'm confused. You state the FAA does not have the authority and you provide a quote from regs the states that they (FAA) do. Every one of the FAA airspace classifications listed except class A starts at the surface. What is your definition of "airspace just over the surface"?

    Regards
    Frank
    It is not possible to write in such a way that cannot be misinterpreted by a reader determined to do so.

  19. #19
    Sport_Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Acworth, GA
    Posts
    13,719
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    I'm confused. You state the FAA does not have the authority and you provide a quote from regs the states that they (FAA) do.
    It says the FAA has authority of navigable airspace. The definition of navigable airspace is the airspace above the limits set by the FAA. So the FAA does not have authority just above the surface except at public airports.
    Glow Head Brotherhood #15

  20. #20
    Silent-AV8R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    4,850
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?


    ORIGINAL: Sport_Pilot
    It says the FAA has authority of navigable airspace. The definition of navigable airspace is the airspace above the limits set by the FAA. So the FAA does not have authority just above the surface except at public airports.

    I thought I heard a familiar drum beat here!! As I have told you numerous times, your interpretation is not consistent with everything I have ever seen or heard from the FAA personnel themselves. I suggest you do us all a huge favor and contact them to tell them that they have no jurisdiction over us or the airspace in which most of us operate. I am certain that they will see the error in their ways and immediately cease and desist.

    Yes, I am being sarcastic because you keep saying this over and over, and it is simply not how the FAA sees it and for now they are the only ones who count.
    Team Futaba - RClipos.com

  21. #21
    RCU Forum Manager/Admin RCKen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Lawton, OK
    Posts
    25,905
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?



    I'm going to have to agree with what was stated above. What does this have to do with the AMA? I wondered this when the thread was first posted but thought I would see where the thread went before I made a decision on what to do with it. As for right now I don't see what this discussion has to do with the AMA. If somebody can explain how this relates to the AMA then I'll let the thread continue, however if not I'm going to close this down.

    Thanks

    Ken

    The take off is optional, but the landing is MANDATORY!!
    RCU Forum Manager
    www.gettingairborne.com
    RCKen Publications
    Brotherhood's
    Ultra Sport Brother #1
    Sig Brotherhood #4
    Balsa USA #4

  22. #22
    Sport_Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Acworth, GA
    Posts
    13,719
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    I thought I heard a familiar drum beat here!! As I have told you numerous times, your interpretation is not consistent with everything I have ever seen or heard from the FAA personnel themselves.
    I quoted the law, are you saying the FAA says that the law does not apply? Do you see the FAA trying to regulate bullets or footballs flying through their airspace? Do you even understand what I am saying?

    BTW. I have talked to the FAA on building permit and obstruction issues and some are ok and some have to be shown the regulations and a talk with their supervisor. Sometimes a judge has to tell them the way it is. In other words like any Federal Agency they try to take a mile when not even given an inch.
    Glow Head Brotherhood #15

  23. #23
    Sport_Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Acworth, GA
    Posts
    13,719
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    What does this have to do with the AMA?
    The model airplane altitude restrictions they will be handing down soon.
    Glow Head Brotherhood #15

  24. #24
    combatpigg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    arlington, WA
    Posts
    17,939
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?

    They need to do a better job of policing their own ranks before coming after us.
    WHO GUNNA FEED MAW KEEEIDS..???

  25. #25
    phlpsfrnk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Spring Hill, FL
    Posts
    731
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: In the National Airspace System (NAS), what class airspace do you normally fly in?


    ORIGINAL: RCKen



    I'm going to have to agree with what was stated above. What does this have to do with the AMA? I wondered this when the thread was first posted but thought I would see where the thread went before I made a decision on what to do with it. As for right now I don't see what this discussion has to do with the AMA. If somebody can explain how this relates to the AMA then I'll let the thread continue, however if not I'm going to close this down.

    Thanks

    Ken

    Ken,
    I started this thread in an effort to determine if the majority of modelers knew what airspace they flew in. Everyone, including AMA pilots fly in the NAS and I thought AMA members would be the most likely to respond. The AMA is the only model organization that I am aware of that is working with the FAA concerning airspace restrictions to UAS. I believe everyone, AMA and non-AMA, should know what airspace they are flying in. If you do not think this is the appropriate place for this poll I’ll repost it wherever you think is more appropriate.

    Regards
    Frank
    It is not possible to write in such a way that cannot be misinterpreted by a reader determined to do so.


Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:33 PM.

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.