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  1. #1
    Zpat's Avatar
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    How to cycle a 1.2V NiCd.......

    I've always cycled batteries with a Digipace and have never had a need to cycle 1.2V until now.

    I'd like to cycle a 1.2V NiCd without a high tech gizmo. I'd like to hear the simple plan
    I think it might have something to do with a lightbulb.

  2. #2

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    RE: How to cycle a 1.2V NiCd.......

    Yeah, you could use a light bulb and put a meter in series with it.

  3. #3

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    RE: How to cycle a 1.2V NiCd.......

    A no brainer, for a single cell you can pull it to absolute zero volts with no damage occuring as long as you did not draw so high a current that you caused excessive self heating internally. Just connect a 2.2 ohm resistor accross the terminals and leave it there for awhile, a couple of hours ought to do it. A better question is why would you want to do this? The chances of a single cell ever exhibiting what some would like to call memory (technically no such thing) is just about 1 in ten million or less. If you measure the ampere hours out though, it will give you a good indication of the health of the cell, all NiCads will wear out usually indicated by it ability to provide the required currentfor the required time. The typical life of a NiCad is 1000 charge/discharge cycles, roughly twice as good as NiMh. When the cell will only supply about 80% of its rated milliampere hours, it is time for replacement.

  4. #4
    Zpat's Avatar
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    RE: How to cycle a 1.2V NiCd.......

    Rodney,
    The reason I asked this is because I have a 2 "D" cell, 4000 mah pack I originally assembled to start twin glow engines.
    I now use it for various size single cylinder engines that are in fun fly machines. When I flew the twin glo engines I just started them and flew. Battery charges were few and far between. Now that I'm flying fun fly I find that the battery is connected to the glow plug longer, sometimes just for longer starting time but most of all is that I leave it connected longer for warm up and to check throttle transition. I've now noticed that the time between charges has shotened considerably.
    I asked about the current draw of a glow plug in the engine forum and received answers ranging from 2 - 4 amps. Since I just got back into glow engines after 10 years of flying gas and the twin glow engines, I was reminded of the power panel and when I thought back to those days I do remember they would pull at least 2 amps regularly.
    What I have found that the dwell time for an energized glow plug has increased considerably since I now expect more from these engines. A dead give away as to battery power now is when my ABC engines start backward. I have found that with a fresh charge they start in the right direction, and a lot quicker.
    I wanted to check the battery condition to see if these cells are in good shape and to give me an idea of how long I can go between charges. So far it looks like they are good for at least 20 start ups.
    I know a 12 volt battery and a power panel would make start ups easier but after you take the starter, 12 volt battery and the power panel out of the flight box and you notice how much lighter it is it's just hard to go back.

  5. #5

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    RE: How to cycle a 1.2V NiCd.......

    I've always cycled my plug lighter batteries once in a while,just to check their condition.I just connect the lighter to an old Glow plug,and leave it until the plug no longer glows.


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