Beginners Beginners in RC start here for help.

Making a Good Landing

Reply
Old 09-10-2012, 08:39 AM
  #76
Simul8R
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Germantown, TN
Posts: 29
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Making a Good Landing

I am still in my early 2nd a/c (3rd actually - RIP 2nd) days. When I was flying my 2nd a/c which was a low wing trainer at a field with a very limited runway I had trouble as I was approaching too fast and had the pleasure of watching my flare use up all the available runway.

I was flying my circuits high because I just didn't trust the engine. At one point I had more deadstick landings on my plane than my glider and that takes some doing.

I slowed down, flying the approach at idle power, but then found that I was running out of energy in the flare and I made a lot of hard and bounced landings. That was when I started to learn to use just a little power into the flare. All of a sudden the plane greased nicely onto the ground.

Now I am flying at a larger field and with an OS 55AX engine on my a/c. The concern about the engine cutting out at any time and especially on a go-around is no longer preventing me from flying circuits at a better height. Approaching with power and just using a little blip power to arrest the descent instead of elevator is making all the difference. With the larger field I don't have to panic if I miss my touchdown point and with that comes the ability to get in more practice approaches.

This backs up what everyone has said. 

Learn to use the power to fly a powered approach using the throttle to control descent, and flare, and not elevator and then just practice. Get out there at a time when there are not many others at the field and then you can just fly circuits and touch and goes for hours if necessary. Don't forget to fly the plane until it is static. I also find that rolling on the mains during the go around is a great practice for rudder control during the takeoff roll.

Just my 2c worth.
Simul8R is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2012, 10:01 AM
  #77
acdii
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Capron, IL
Posts: 6,640
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Making a Good Landing

This is how I land my Kadet. Makes it look really good too as it rolls out on the mains before ht tail touches down.  The 4*120 though, I have to work on getting the idle right on the DLE20, its too low and transitions on power up are slow, so I have to really stay ahead of the plane when landing so I dont stall it out.
acdii is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2012, 12:30 PM
  #78
billd76
 
billd76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Nottingham, PA
Posts: 1,183
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Making a Good Landing

Quote:
ORIGINAL: Simul8R

I am still in my early 2nd a/c (3rd actually - RIP 2nd) days. When I was flying my 2nd a/c which was a low wing trainer at a field with a very limited runway I had trouble as I was approaching too fast and had the pleasure of watching my flare use up all the available runway.

I was flying my circuits high because I just didn't trust the engine. At one point I had more deadstick landings on my plane than my glider and that takes some doing.

I slowed down, flying the approach at idle power, but then found that I was running out of energy in the flare and I made a lot of hard and bounced landings. That was when I started to learn to use just a little power into the flare. All of a sudden the plane greased nicely onto the ground.

Now I am flying at a larger field and with an OS 55AX engine on my a/c. The concern about the engine cutting out at any time and especially on a go-around is no longer preventing me from flying circuits at a better height. Approaching with power and just using a little blip power to arrest the descent instead of elevator is making all the difference. With the larger field I don't have to panic if I miss my touchdown point and with that comes the ability to get in more practice approaches.

This backs up what everyone has said.

Learn to use the power to fly a powered approach using the throttle to control descent, and flare, and not elevator and then just practice. Get out there at a time when there are not many others at the field and then you can just fly circuits and touch and goes for hours if necessary. Don't forget to fly the plane until it is static. I also find that rolling on the mains during the go around is a great practice for rudder control during the takeoff roll.

Just my 2c worth.

Concur with all said here. Use the throttle and not the elevator for control. However your plane needs to be trimmed for level flight while up in the air at half throttle. Once properlly trimmed you should be able to use the throttle to control your alltitude when landing. If you use the elevator when landing (too much that is) the plane will almost always stall, primarily becuase you do not have enough speed to maintain altitude. Resulting of course in a crash. some of the lighter 3d planes will float right in, but even they will land super smooth with a touch and I mean just a touch or blip of throttle. When you U tube guys flying. listen to the throttle when that come in or when they are doing their tricks, throttle management is the key you just about all they do. Minn Flyer (God rest his soul) gave me the best advice I've ever got on landing. He told me to " learn to fly the plane 2 foot off the ground without landing using as much of the run way as you can" Once you can do that you can certainly land the plane.
billd76 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:33 AM.