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You know it's windy when....

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Old 08-26-2013, 01:31 PM
  #26
jester_s1
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Lol Gerry. Stolen.

For those who don't live in windy places, it's not so bad. You find that a different set of airplanes are popular in windy places, and of course the developed skill set is a little different. My club doesn't even recommend the traditional trainers like the LT-40 and Nextstar. We've been big fans of the Avistar (thanks for messing with perfection, Hobbico) because it handles the wind so much better. But here, you see lots of Ugly Sticks, lots of SPA type planes, plenty of warbirds, and nearly everyone has a foamy or two. What you don't see a whole lot is WWI biplanes, small 3D planes, or anything under powered. The ubiquitous Cub is everywhere, but here it's a special occasion flyer. Either that or it's crazy overpowered so it can cut through the wind turbulence on normal flying days.
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Old 08-26-2013, 01:47 PM
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We have wind here in west Texas 90% of the time blowing 10 - 15 mph from the south and always gust past 20 mph. I am teaching my nephew to fly and the best time to fly here is right before sun up till about 10 am. The first 2 afternoons that we tried to go out and fly, the good ole wind was blowing 20-25 mph. I had to get him to hold the plane until I was ready to firewall the throttle. Take off was less than 15 feet and you could almost land it without any roll. I am teaching him to fly on a sky raider Mach 1 trainer. At 1/2 throttle and up , it will handle the wind extremely well as there is no dihedral in the wing. He is doing well learning to fly and may be ready to attempt take offs after a couple of more flights. I did show him how easy it was to land in a tumbleweed at the end of the runway too !! Luckily it was a nice new green tumbleweed about 30" tall and didn't hurt the plane at all.
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Old 08-26-2013, 02:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thatairplaneguy View Post
I've actually took off backwards before....
Awesome.
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Old 08-26-2013, 02:38 PM
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Ahrrrrr, one thing is to fly in the winds, the other are the stupid forecasts.
My trip to both fields I fly from is long, 30 & 45 minutes. So I check 2-3 different weather websites before I go for wind and rain.
Today the 3 websites agreed on 9 kph winds and no rain............
You guessed right, at least 20kph winds and gusty, maybe more 100 ft up. It made for good ugly landings with power.
Good thing that my preferred plane 60 size electric Sbach has a good landing gear, she came home standing in all 3 wheels
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Old 08-26-2013, 02:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jester_s1 View Post
Here in Texas as well as other windy places it's pretty standard for guys to have a windy day plane just be about to get out on days like that. My Ultra Stick and Kaos are excellent in the wind, as is (surprisingly) my Parkzone Stryker. I've had that little foamy out in very whippy 30 mph winds before and it still flies like a beast. IMO, a heavyish Kaos is as good as it gets for a windy day plane, with an Ugly Stick a very close second and a good bit more beginner friendly due to the straight wing and generous vertical stabilizer that weathevanes into the wind really quickly. Guys who are thinking about keeping their trainers for windy day flying are barking up the wrong tree, because a trainer has a lot of negatives in that environment. They are too lightly loaded, they are too airspeed sensitive in pitch, and the dihedral makes them roll away from any side breeze. Trainers are nice later on for those calm days when you just want to make lazy circles around the flying field, not for fighting gusty and turbulent wind.
I never looked at it like that. I looked at damage limitation by keeping my nice models at from e wind. Perhaps I should use my Spacewalker for windy days.
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Old 08-26-2013, 05:16 PM
  #31
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Originally Posted by MajorTomski View Post
Congratulations on conqureing the wind! One comment though. I've been teaching RC in Oklahoma for 18 years now. We ususally stop teaching at 16 mph due to the facts the students learn very little when they are fighting winds and associated gusts like that.

For 99% of all RC planes there is absolutely no need for the plane to be lined up with the runway before touch down. It is perfectly accptable to touch down in the crab and then turn to roll down the centerline of the runway.

The need to go parallel to the line of flight is true of full scale planes but our landing gear are relatively 1000's of times stronger than a full scale plane.

So make it easier on yourself, ago ahead and get used to touching down in the crab till you get the skills of flying in the wind mastered. Then add the "polish" of makeing that full scale type in-to-the- wind cross controlled slip down.

MTC YMMV

This pretty much sums up my landing, it was crabbed all the way down, it was the touch down the didnt go so well, only because of the nasty turbulence over the barn roof that caused it to ground loop and snap the prop. If I didnt have to worry about hitting the A-26 or Panther sitting there, would make for a lower pucker factor when landing from that direction.
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Old 08-26-2013, 05:55 PM
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Just about everybody with any stick time has flown in winds high enough to stop their model in one spot over the runway. I've done it in a full sized Cessna 152 while under the hood. My instructor was having me hold a heading and altitude while slowing the airplane down to just a few mph over stall speed which would be about 50 mph. I didn't know what he was up to until he had me remove the hood and look down at the airplanes shadow. It was stopped near a road. The real excitement of that flight was landing at an away airport and getting off the runway and tied down. I got out of the airplane to hold the upwind strut so we could turn off to taxi to the tie down area. Once there, I had to hold the brakes and keep the engine running while he tied down the plane. On returning to our local airport he showed me just how far the ailerons will really go (the yoke was upside down) to correct for cross winds. After that lesson, I always tried to have my flights on days with more cross winds because a wind down the runway is just too easy.
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Old 08-26-2013, 06:41 PM
  #33
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Carl, at your level of experience it's better to just not fly on the whippy wind days. If you don't feel confident in your ability to fly it in fairly calm conditions, it's not going to get any better in the wind. But of the two, your Spacewalker will definitely be easier to handle on windy days. When you're ready to really have some fun, get an Ugly Stick and start practicing backwards takeoffs and hover landings!
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Old 08-26-2013, 08:02 PM
  #34
Jim Branaum
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighPlains View Post
Just about everybody with any stick time has flown in winds high enough to stop their model in one spot over the runway. I've done it in a full sized Cessna 152 while under the hood. My instructor was having me hold a heading and altitude while slowing the airplane down to just a few mph over stall speed which would be about 50 mph. I didn't know what he was up to until he had me remove the hood and look down at the airplanes shadow. It was stopped near a road. The real excitement of that flight was landing at an away airport and getting off the runway and tied down. I got out of the airplane to hold the upwind strut so we could turn off to taxi to the tie down area. Once there, I had to hold the brakes and keep the engine running while he tied down the plane. On returning to our local airport he showed me just how far the ailerons will really go (the yoke was upside down) to correct for cross winds. After that lesson, I always tried to have my flights on days with more cross winds because a wind down the runway is just too easy.
ROFLOL!

I checked in with Approach Control with Information Hotel while over the north practice area one fine morning as a front blew in. I was in a C-150, had the flaps full down, the engine at idle with the carb heat pulled, and pointed into the wind. The little protector over the pitot tube wouldn't stay open so the airspeed kept going to 0. It took Approach Control a couple of minutes to notice and start yelling because my ground track was opposite of reported heading. Now THAT was a blast! The hardest one was the landing for fuel at OKC with a 26 knot headwind in a C-152. The landing was cake, taxiing to parking was just plain hard work..

I fly models in places where there is high wind and manage to land without too much embarrassment although some of the approaches look real strange!. Take off, start the left turn and hold it until lined up for final... OOPS! That is normal for me.

Some 30 years ago I went to an event in west Texas. All I had was .25 sized airplanes. As I was assembling them someone came up and told me I couldn't fly those there so I asked why. They said the wind was too bad for anything smaller than .60 sized planes. I owned their sky for the entire weekend! Now they fly .25 sized planes there.

The next year I borrowed Kadet Senior just for that event. It had some significant modifications - straight wing, conventional gear, a four stroke (OS 61?), a glider launch assembly and servo, and HUGE flaps! I was trying to back it down to a landing but chickened out when the plane got unstable in the roiling air about a foot or so off the ground - I was having trouble flaring the tail wheel 'properly'. We would get a gust and I had to work the elevator and the tail wheel would go here or there. I hate breaking someone else's airplane so I gave up.

Seriously, when you use the wide short runway to take off it is accepted proof that there might be some wind. When you LAND on that same runway, mere mortals like me pack up and leave the field to you.

Try flying on the coast for a lesson in wind 'management'
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Old 08-26-2013, 10:13 PM
  #35
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...you're standing in the runway with one hand on the stab and the other trying to get enough throttle to keep the tail straight before takeoff.
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Old 08-27-2013, 05:49 AM
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gaRCfield View Post
...you're standing in the runway with one hand on the stab and the other trying to get enough throttle to keep the tail straight before takeoff.


Now you got the idea of this thread! LOL
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Old 08-27-2013, 10:39 AM
  #37
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You know it is too windy when your plane doesn't need to get any ground speed to fly. Or the plane can't make headway against the wind and you wind up going way downrange to try to land.

I had that happen years ago on a windy November day and I really wanted to fly that day. I had to hold the plane up until I was ready to fly and it was quite tricky as it wanted to fly just sitting there on the ground. It was a problem trying to start the engine and not have the plane flip over on me in the process. Anyway, take off was more like a Harrier jet taking off, no rolling off down the runway, just give it throttle and up and away it went. The plane would flash byu fast on the downwind leg and take a long time going upwind. Later the engine flamed out and the plane couldn't penetrate and I wound up landing way downwind from where it took off from. I don't think it had any ground speed doing it either. It was fun hovering around in the air too. I was idling the engine too long and it stalled out on me.

Yeah I have my "windy day planes" too. But if I do a lot of flying when it is windy, I get so I have a lot of trouble landing the planes when it isn't windy.
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Old 08-27-2013, 11:03 AM
  #38
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Earlwb, been there, done that! When I flew in Maine we were only a few miles inland so we constantly had wind. I got so use to landing with the wind that one day it was calm and I couldn't seem to get the plane to land. I kept overshooting the runway.

I use to be stationed at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, Where most of the Navy's flight testing is done. They had a blimp there coming in to land with a strong headwind. His groundspeed had to be about 5-10 MPH. He did a 180 and really started moving the other way. The wind must have really been kicking his *****.
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Old 08-27-2013, 11:57 AM
  #39
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We fly in the wind down here in Florida a lot. My personal take on wind limitations is when I have trouble trying to taxi on or off the runway. With that said I have flown in worse conditions wishing I hadn't once breaking ground. Words of advice would be to fly in conditions that are comfortable to you, if they are not then don't. In time your limitations with wind will most likely expand with experience gained, so fly when its windy just use judgement. He who walks away gets to fly his airplane another day is not all that a bad rule if its making
you nervous.
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Old 08-27-2013, 01:55 PM
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Oklahoma provides LOTS of crosswind, gust, and variable-direction wind practice. Here's a handy resource for everyone - just click on your state to see the good news...always current from the most current reporting airport weather stations in your area.... enjoy!!

http://www.usairnet.com/weather/maps...nt/wind-speed/
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Old 08-27-2013, 02:52 PM
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I used to be afraid of the wind , now I love it .. I don't fly all my planes in the wind and I don't do maidens in the wind but I have favorite wind planes like my LT40 that I can take up and play in the wind.. I like to see if I can sit still or go backwards and pratice my cross wind landings .. Wind can be a challenge and a lot of fun.. It and also be expensive so I avoid taking up expensive planes .. Some planes that are heavy fly pretty good in the wind but they dont need to be heavy to take up and have fun with..
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Old 08-28-2013, 05:42 AM
  #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bikerbc View Post
I used to be afraid of the wind , now I love it .. I don't fly all my planes in the wind and I don't do maidens in the wind but I have favorite wind planes like my LT40 that I can take up and play in the wind.. I like to see if I can sit still or go backwards and pratice my cross wind landings .. Wind can be a challenge and a lot of fun.. It and also be expensive so I avoid taking up expensive planes .. Some planes that are heavy fly pretty good in the wind but they dont need to be heavy to take up and have fun with..
Ditto. I prefer wind out of the East, West or North though so I dont have to deal with that nasty turbulence. I flew my little Inversa yesterday in the wind, nearly lost it though because it got downwind and I lost orientation but was able to finally steer it back and knew it was in the right direction by how slow it was flying. Pretty cool having it hover while moving. It was rock steady at altitude, nose straight up, wind pushing it to my right. Considering how light this 26" plane is, it did OK in 18 MPH winds.
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Old 08-30-2013, 12:56 AM
  #43
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At our field we have a name for days like that ...... it’s called NORMAL
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Old 08-30-2013, 02:50 AM
  #44
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I fly on cape cod, so wind is a normal thing, but when the wind is over 15 I find that I only fly my wind planes.

On of my favorite wind planes is my Q500, and my uproar. The Q500 is nice because it flys very fast with a downwind pass

the uproar is fun to toss around the sky. I tend not to fly my aerobatic models as the high wind affects the lines so much it starts to annoy me.

I have had the uproar going backwards a few times that was cool.
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Old 08-30-2013, 11:45 AM
  #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jester_s1 View Post
Carl, at your level of experience it's better to just not fly on the whippy wind days. If you don't feel confident in your ability to fly it in fairly calm conditions, it's not going to get any better in the wind. But of the two, your Spacewalker will definitely be easier to handle on windy days. When you're ready to really have some fun, get an Ugly Stick and start practicing backwards takeoffs and hover landings!
Jester, your words are wise as always but I'm a bit of a fool, as always and can't help but want to fly in the wind or not. I oonly get a couple of hours here and there between business and kids so I have to take the slot regardless of weather. I've set my limit at 25mph for now but it's the gusts that get you really on landing.

i flew my trainer yesterday and to be honest I found it harder to fly than my space walker. I think half the problem is the crappy magnum powering it. Anyway an so max 40 fp came today so ill try that.

i like the look of those ugly sticks. Can you buy them or are they a plan build?
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:22 PM
  #46
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I think the wind chart is informative, however I it must be clarified that the speeds are in meters per second. So here is some additional information to better use the chart information.

1 metre per second (m/s, ms-1) = 2.237 miles per hour (mph) 1 metre per second (m/s, ms-1) = 1.9426 Knots (Kts)* 1 metre per second (m/s, ms-1) = 3.60 kilometres per ...
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:23 PM
  #47
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[QUOTE=carl24bpool;11604219]

i like the look of those ugly sticks. Can you buy them or are they a plan build?

[/QUOTEU

Ugly Sticks or the many clones have been around what seems forever and produced in plan, kits and arfs. The two most common in the smaller glow sizes are the Ultra Sticks distributed by horizon in I think in several sizes and the Great Planes Big Stick sold through tower hobbies.

The sticks will handle really big winds with ease compared to many other types. I hesitate to throw out windspeed numbers since its very difficult to estimate with many numbers often tossed around are acutally gross over estimates. Wind it comes to 'wind' most RC flyers (That includes the controlline and free flight guys) tend to be close relatives to fishermen and their fish storys

I have an Ultra Stick 120 Lite and a Great Planes Big Stick 40 and love them both.

Anyway here is the link for the Big Stick .40 also avalible in .60 and 1.20 sizes:

http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXBMM9&P=RF

John

Last edited by JohnBuckner; 08-30-2013 at 01:26 PM.
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Old 08-30-2013, 05:16 PM
  #48
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Carl, you can have a stick any way you want it! There are many derivative designs that share the same easy flying characteristics. The Pulse comes to mind, along with the Easy Sport. There are some small differences there, but the basic aerodynamics are the same. If you go with a stick for windy day flying, stick with the largest recommended engine, keep it a touch nose heavy, and set the control throws up near the maximum (assuming you have exponential in your radio). My "fly in any wind" plane is a .60 size H9 Ultra Stick with a Super Tigre G90 on the nose. It can power through any wind and out of any stall, and it has just enough control throw that I'll go to the corners only occasionally when flying in gusty wind.
Landing technique does change in the wind. You can't flare and let it settle in like you do normally. You have to fly the plane all the way to the ground, touching the wheels down often with enough airspeed that you could just go right back up if you wanted to. I got up once in about 5 mph wind and had a thunderstorm roll in about 2 minutes later. There was enough turbulent wind to blow my hat off and move me around a bit, so I'll guess 18-20 mph with gusts as high as 30 by the time I got a runway approach I liked. That particular landing was an exercise in patience as I shot a couple of approaches and tried to keep it straight over the runway waiting for the air to be cooperative. I finally got a down push that got me to about 6 inches altitude, so I just relaxed the elevator and let the wheels touch. It was actually a nice smooth landing, but wouldn't have been if I had tried to decide when it was going to happen right at the end of the runway on my timing like I usually do. The point being, when you get up in really unfriendly air you have to really watch the plane and read what the wind is doing to it. Gusts are opportunities to bleed off some altitude if you need to, and a second or two of smooth flight is about all the indication you'll get that it's a good time to land.
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