Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 33 of 33

  1. #26

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Blackpool, UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    286
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    Wow! I've used the same bands since I started about 6 months ago. Hey still seem fine. Lol. I have loads spare but keep using them. I just stretch them to the limit before using to check they will be okay and as mentioned I also fit quite a few as backup.

  2. #27
    The exhaust residue dissolves them

  3. #28

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Owatonna, MN
    Posts
    60
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    I use an empty peanut butter jar filled with soapy water. Give it a shake now and then and change the mixture every week or so. You can look at the bands after three or four uses and tell if they are degrading. But otherwise, #64 bands at Office Max are dirt cheap. Use them twice and pitch them.

  4. #29
    Charlie P.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Port Crane, NY
    Posts
    4,876
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    Quote Originally Posted by kwblake View Post
    WOW!!!!! 21 posts on the cost of a %$$##&* rubber band. You can afford to spend hundreds, on the Plane, Receiver, Transmitter, Servos, Fuel, or Batteries, and an engine, all of your field supplies, gas to and from your field, but some of you want to save 2 cents, on a $%#*^%! rubber band. Un-%$^&*#$ believable.............. Boy, am I going to get flamed on this one.
    Actually I agree. When I flew models that used #64 rubber bands to hold the wing I bought them by the pound at an office supply store and tossed the six I would use after a day's flying. Rubber bands are cheap, models, servoes, receiver and engine not so.

    If you are cheap add a couple brass threaded inserts and use Nylon bolts. A simple upgrade. If you go beyond cheap into parsimonius use a threaded hardwood block saturated with CA and a few Nylon bolts.

    But rubber bands still worlk and are a viable solution. One old method from my control-line days was to store them in talc (baby powder) after use.
    Charlie P. (NY) "Gravity is weak but persistant".

    AMA 747089/IMAA 30723

  5. #30

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Over da rainbow, KS
    Posts
    4,830
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    Well regardless whether you use a band once, or a half dozen times, never use one without stretching it out to it's limit. Just hold it between your thumbs away from the rest of your hand to test each one. I've had new ones break as well as used, but never had them fail on the plane after testing.
    - Supplementary insipid innocuous inane vacuous proclamation

  6. #31
    The exhaust residue dissolves them.

  7. #32

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    ToowoombaQLD, AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    798
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    I remember the good ol' days, you'd yank the elevator at bit too hard and hear the thump as the wing lifts and hits back down. Get it wrong and the wing would fly off for good :-)

    Great for trimming rudder/elevator gliders with warped wings, just rotate the wing a bit until the rudder trim is straight again and/or offset the wing a few mm to one side.

    Hand tosses for trimming, who remembers those days?

  8. #33

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Blackpool, UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    286
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback
    Quote Originally Posted by eiutian View Post
    The exhaust residue dissolves them.
    I think this depends on the make up of the rubber.

    I think latex bands are prone to this as it is a natural rubber. Other types are much more resistant.


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:24 AM.

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.