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Barn Door aileron vs. Strip aileron

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Old 09-25-2003, 08:30 AM
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jbeck
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Default Barn Door aileron vs. Strip aileron

Hi all,

I have been flying for a little while now, but I am running across something that confuses me: What is the difference between Barn Door ailerons and Strip ailerons, both in the way they look and also the functionality that they provide? I don't know how to tell the difference!
[&:]
Thanks!
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Old 09-25-2003, 09:12 AM
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Lightfoot
 
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Default RE: Barn Door aileron vs. Strip aileron

Take a look at the Practical R/C Model Design article under the Hints & Tips section of my web page. One wing in the top view diagram shows the barn door type aileron and the other shows the strip aileron. A picture is worth a thousand words.
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Old 09-25-2003, 10:24 AM
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Ed_Moorman
 
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Default RE: Barn Door aileron vs. Strip aileron

The term "barn door ailerons" has been misused lately. You see some ads calling wide ailerons "barn doors." This is not normal usage for the name.

The generally accepted use of barn door means an inset aileron at or near the wing tip. It requires a modified wing with a cut out for the aileron. It also leaves room for flaps as seem on many scale planes. For the same area, barn door ailerons are wider and shorter than a corresponding strip aileron.

A strip aileron generally covers the whole length of the trailing edge. For the same area as a barn door aileron, they are narrower. They do not require a modified wing. You build a wing and hang a narrow strip of wood on the trailing edge for control. They were originally designed for ease of construction. The portion near the center of the airplane gives very little in the way of rolling force, but for the older designs with one aileron servo and torque rods, they were easy to install and hook up.

Modern planes, especially fun fly type planes have extremely wide ailerons which has prompted some distributors to advertise barn door ailerons. Technically, these are just very wide strip ailerons, so be careful what you read and look at the plane to determine what type ailerons it has.
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Old 09-25-2003, 11:09 AM
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Default RE: Barn Door aileron vs. Strip aileron

In the air, assuming the same area, barn door ailerons (using Ed's excelent description above) will be more effective in normal flight. However as the plane looses airspeed, they loose effectiveness, and if the wing stalls, they are totally useless. Somewhere along the line, someone discovered the strip ailerons maintained some effictiveness at slow speeds and after a stall because part of the aileron is in the prop slipstream. Which is why you now see really big strip ailerons on planes intended for 3D or wild acrobatics, those planes have roll control even after the wing has stalled. The more narrow strip ailerons are still the most common type on models for ease of construction.
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Old 09-26-2003, 03:36 PM
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Default RE: Barn Door aileron vs. Strip aileron

A lot depends on the airplane. Scale or semi-scale would have barn door or inset ailerons near the tip of the wing. The strip ailerons are the type used on most trainers and fun-fly types. They are some cheaper for manufacturers because the design generally can work with one servo in the center of the wing. One thing that is seldom used on model aircraft is aileron differential to help with adverse yaw. With the newer computer radios that can usually be programmed in. There are however mechanical ways to accomplish the same action, even with strip ailerons. It's all in the shape of the servo arm. The choice of barn doors or strips depends on you and the design of the model.
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