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Hi all - new member looking for advice

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Old 08-18-2017, 05:01 PM
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Default Hi all - new member looking for advice

Hi all,

My name is Andrew, and I have just recently gotten into flying RC planes. My wife and I both bought a couple of foamy RTF planes - I got the Sportsman S+ and she got the Delta Ray. We're both pretty happy with our planes, because our skill level is currently zero when it comes to flying. We've joined a local RC flyers club and I'm looking for a winter project. I want to build my next trainer - gas powered this time. I am looking for something that's big (to me, the larger planes are much easier to see in the air) and 4 channel. Obviously, all the elements of a trainer are important to me as well - i want it to be relatively easy to fly, not super fast, and fun. While I have very little experience building R/C planes, I am an engineer in the aerospace industry by trade, and am pretty handy with tools, blueprints, and am capable of reading and understanding instructions.

Any input you have for me would be great - thanks in advance!
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Old 08-18-2017, 06:43 PM
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flyboy2610
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Great Planes PT-60. Great Planes PT-60 Trainer Kit .45-.60,71" | TowerHobbies.com

Of course, I'm biased. I'm building one right now. https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...t-Planes-PT-60
My first trainer was the PT-40, back about 17 years ago. Rock solid, flew like it was on rails. Pretty easy assembly for a kit, also.
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Old 08-18-2017, 06:44 PM
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52larry52
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Check out the Sig Kadet Sr. in either the kit or ARF form.
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Old 08-18-2017, 11:43 PM
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A SIG LT-40 is an excellent trainer. Wingspan is 70". It has a nosewheel - easier to steer than a taildragger. I've got 2 LT-40 ARF's. One is a float plane, the other I received yesterday and I'm in the process of putting it together. I will use it for my club's Trainer Banger competition which is a contest to see who can perform the following maneuvers the best:
- fast pass
- slow pass
- figure 8
- descending loop
- etc.

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Old 08-19-2017, 05:42 AM
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When you say build I am thinking you are contemplating a kit or from plans rather than an arf.

One of the best kit built trainers ever is the TELEMASTER by Hobby Lobby now called Hobby Express. They come in a variety of sizes and configurations. They even come as ARFs if your so inclined. Ask anyone who has owned/flown one. I have been in the hobby for over 40 years and I still own and fly 3 different models. I highly recommend to build what ever you decide on as a tail dragger.

Telemasters

If your looking to build from plans and want something different that flys just as nice as the Telemaster I recommend Chuck Cunninghams Lazy Ace. It too comes in different sizes.

First pic Telemaster .40 on floats Saito .50

Second and third pic first 72 inch Lazy Ace

Fourth is second Lazy Ace fitted with a cradle to take up gliders
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Old 08-20-2017, 06:41 PM
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Cool, thanks for the advice, folks. I really like the Sig Kadet senior - but I am wondering if it's difficult to build with ailerons...I'd definitely want to have them.
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Old 08-20-2017, 06:47 PM
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It's not a problem to add ailerons to a Kadet. If you have someone that's an experienced builder at your club that can help you out, even better.
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Old 08-20-2017, 07:22 PM
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I would highly recommend the Sig LT40 as your first build. It`s already got ailerons and if you follow the recommended beef-ups, it`s one tough bird.
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Old 08-21-2017, 03:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Stickslammer View Post
I would highly recommend the Sig LT40 as your first build. It`s already got ailerons and if you follow the recommended beef-ups, it`s one tough bird.

While I am a big fan of the Kadet Senior, I tend to agree with you.

If ailerons are desired, I feel that it would be best for a novice builder to construct a model that already has them in the design.

The LT-40 is an excellent trainer, too. The Kadet Senior could be built at a later date, when the builder has gained some experience.

Here's a pic of my aileron equipped Kadet Senior, also modiefied into a tail dragger.
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Old 08-21-2017, 08:06 AM
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Propworn
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The telemaster has ailerons and flaps as well.
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Old 08-21-2017, 10:21 AM
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I taught myself to fly with a Sig LT-40. There was no one in the area for help. It's very stable and forgiving. I had several take-offs and landings that first day with no damage to the plane or my ego.
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Old 08-22-2017, 03:08 PM
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It's not hard to add barn door type ailerons to a model. You start with a properly built wing per the plans, then cut out the ailerons from it being sure to cut the straight and both the same. Then you cut 3/8 more away from the wing so you can add it back as a balsa trailing edge. Do the same to the aileron pieces (3/8 or 1/4 depending on their thickness and what it will take to make a nice bevel) and then cover and hinge. Anybody that can build a kit can add ailerons.

Of course, if you're going to do that it's helpful to reduce the dihedral to 1/2 of what it should be without ailerons. That's a but more involved, but not much more.
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Old 08-22-2017, 03:42 PM
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HMMMM buy a kit you have to bash to get what your after or buy one that has the ailerons and flaps designed into it??????????????
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Old 08-23-2017, 04:51 AM
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Originally Posted by jester_s1 View Post
It's not hard to add barn door type ailerons to a model. You start with a properly built wing per the plans, then cut out the ailerons from it being sure to cut the straight and both the same. Then you cut 3/8 more away from the wing so you can add it back as a balsa trailing edge. Do the same to the aileron pieces (3/8 or 1/4 depending on their thickness and what it will take to make a nice bevel) and then cover and hinge. Anybody that can build a kit can add ailerons.

Of course, if you're going to do that it's helpful to reduce the dihedral to 1/2 of what it should be without ailerons. That's a but more involved, but not much more.
All it takes is changing the angle of the inboard end rib on each wing half. Easy way to do that is to glue everything to the spars EXCEPT the inner rib and raise the outboard end up to where you want your dihedral to be. Then you mark the spars to show the angle, make an oversized rib, glue it in after slotting for the spars and sand the top to match the rest of the ribs. Will add maybe 30 minutes to the wing build, if that
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Old 08-23-2017, 05:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Propworn View Post
HMMMM buy a kit you have to bash to get what your after or buy one that has the ailerons and flaps designed into it??????????????
How is adding ailerons "kitbashing"? It's only making a few cuts in some of the ribs and adding two pieces of strip stock per wing. I'd think "kitbashing" would be more like changing a single nose mounted engine plane to a wing mounted twin engine configuration. Then again, since I've not built an R/C model "stock" since 1986, is it possible that I, just maybe, could be out of touch with reality?

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Old 08-23-2017, 06:31 AM
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I don't feel that adding ailerons is suitable for a novice.

Yes. It's easy to do, but that's from the prospective of experienced builders.

Choosing a model with ailerons already in the design, may be in the best interest of the beginning builder.
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Old 08-23-2017, 06:42 AM
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Originally Posted by TomCrump View Post
I don't feel that adding ailerons is suitable for a novice.

Yes. It's easy to do, but that's from the prospective of experienced builders.

Choosing a model with ailerons already in the design, may be in the best interest of the beginning builder.
That's why, back in post 7, I recommended having an experienced builder help. Not everyone is mechanically inclined
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Old 08-23-2017, 06:46 AM
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You said in your first post that you have joined a RC club in your area. Most clubs have instructor pilots that will help make decisions and give sound advice on which plane to build. All the kits mentioned above will be good choices but some may be more user friendly if you are going to use an instructor with a trainer box. Just something to think about...
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Old 08-23-2017, 09:01 AM
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Arf or build from a kit the link to the Telemaster page has all the options one would need. All different sizes mini, .40, 60 giant size, ARF or kit, float kits, wing kits, even a twin if your interested.

Again here is the link Telemasters
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Old 05-20-2018, 04:08 PM
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Originally Posted by bhady View Post
I taught myself to fly with a Sig LT-40. There was no one in the area for help. It's very stable and forgiving. I had several take-offs and landings that first day with no damage to the plane or my ego.
Haha LOL... I SEE YOUR STILL SPREADING THIS HOGWASH!!

Hey Brad you did NOT teach yourself to fly --- ( I taught you to fly....) Just to refresh your memory Brad, you were on the other end of my buddy cord on your first umpteen flights as I taught you to fly. Plus, not only did I each you but I also taught your son in law Brian to fly too! I had you both on a buddy cord many many times over the course of a few months. Then once you started to get the hang of it, I suggested you and Brian get yourselves the Realflight simulator to further better yourself before soloing a plane on your own.
Now as for myself, I did in FACT teach MYSELF to fly by smashing a Duraplane over and over again and again until I started to get the hang of it. Then I bought an Aerofly Pro Deluxe sim and finished my own training. It was a very long and tedious endeavor that spanned over a two year period, but I never gave up and today I fly a 43% 3.1 CARF Super Extra with a DA170, A Carden Edge 40% with a DA150, a 37.5% TOC Yak with a DA150, a Aeroworks 35% Ultimate with a DA100, a Horizon 35% 260 Extra with a DA100, A Chip Hyde Double Vision with a DA50. plus 4 more giants that are electrified with Hacker 50cc A60 motors, and many other 30cc's electrics plus a ton of foamies and have a beautiful 8x20 smooth sided trailer to pull it all around..... Yeah I'm bragging now, LOL ~Jack~
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Old 05-21-2018, 09:24 AM
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If you want to build from plans, that’s great, but be prepared to spend a lot more money! Building from scratch is time consuming, but the results are worth the time and money.I know a kit or an ARF might sound expensive, but it is a LOT less expensive and everything fits and most likely has hardware with it.Even if you have a local Hobby Shop, they won’t have everything you need to scratch build.Start with an ARF and learn how a plane goes together and what hardware you’ll need.It’s all figured out and in the box!Latter on go for a scratch build like below...

Currenly on the bench
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Old 05-22-2018, 07:18 AM
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Hi!
Telemaster is one of the best high winged trainers together with a .40 engine like the ASP/Kyosho engine swinging a 11x6 APC, RAM or Graupner G-sonic prop.
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Old 05-31-2018, 09:44 PM
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we have same wife
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Old 06-07-2018, 10:23 PM
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Telemaster, Sig Kadet, Senior, Sig Kadet LT-40, Great Planes PT-40/PT-60 are all excellent trainer airframes. Lots of good suggestions here.

You might also take a look at the Balsa USA Student Trainer kit. It's designed to not only be an excellent trainer, it also comes with a very thorough manual and documentation to walk the first-time builder through the process of turning a box of sticks into a smooth-flying trainer plane: Student Trainer

I'm a computer hardware engineer, I can tear down and rebuild computer systems in my sleep, but working with wood and glue was foreign to me when I first got in the hobby. I wish the Balsa USA Student Trainer was around when I got started, I could have learned a lot more about building a lot more quickly. It's just one more great option to add to your shopping list.
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