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  1. #1

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    trainer to patternship

    Is this a nice idea to switch from a trainer to a pattern ship plane? A friend of mine has started flying 2 months ago with a trainer and now his flying has improved very much. He is switching to Rubin 60 directly... any suggestions

  2. #2

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    Next step from a trainer

    FCC,
    I think the pattern ship makes an excellent 3rd airplane. There is a misconception that pattern planes are hard to fly since most are used for aerobatics. They just go where you point them. The trainer on the other hand is designed to fly better upright than inverted which helps in the learning process. Pattern planes can be more difficult to land for someone in the learning curve. I would suggest an intermediate shoulder wing plane such as a Sig Midstar which is a shoulder wing and a semi symmetrical airfoil and rather long wings. Some like the "stick" (derivitaves of the Ugly Stick) as a second plane bit I find them too responsive for most.

    (This is posted in 2 forums // please review the General Rules #3 for further information) Thanks, Bill

  3. #3
    GrnBrt's Avatar
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    trainer to patternship

    I would think long and hard before doing such a jump. These pattern don't leave much room for mistakes and if you aren't on your toes it will lawn dart on you very quickly. I like the suggestion of the MidStar 40 as it's a great flying plane. Plenty of time to go pattern later.
    Art Grabow SR
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  4. #4
    Rocketman612's Avatar
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    Pattern Plane

    Not a good idea. My son is now flying a Bridy Kaos 60 scale as his 3rd plane and is really enjoying it. I think because he is more patient and has learned from prior mistakes (New firewall,Props) He used a starfire 40 as his 2nd plane. Agree with going with a 4 Star ,Big Stick other symetrical wing plane and cut your teeth. The Kaos is easy to fly but it goes where you put it and will ruin your day if your not careful. Pete
    \"Remember, all I\'\'m offering is the truth, nothing more...\"
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  5. #5
    Mike James's Avatar
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    Surviving while learning

    After I went through the trainer stage, I had a few pattern-ish planes, but they could be flown on the tame side at low throttle, and were a blast to fly fast and aerobatically later. (Great Planes "Ultra Sport .40, for example) They have "go where you point" qualities, but won't destroy your budget like a fast, expensive "pro" pattern plane.

    The key to avoiding trouble with a lot of these planes is simply to throttle back, until you're used to the new qualities. The Goldberg "Tiger" series are a good choice, too.
    Mike James
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  6. #6
    DGrant's Avatar
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    It is quite a jump....

    but not to some chosen few that seem to have a natural ability for this. I say carefully "chosen few" as there are not to many that can make that much of a jump in performance.
    The aerodynamics are obviously much "slicker" with the pattern ship. The Rubin was a decently agressive pattern ship at that.
    There are really so many habits that should develop before taking that on, and if the person taking it on has developed these I say go for it. Things like throttling back when needed, knowing when to add power, etc... should be to a point that it's not thought about, just done. Landings should be greasers at least EVERY time, with most planes he's flying. These things are for the person that doesn't want to spend his time fixing his pattern plane. Other then that, you have to take the step sometime if your staying in the hobby, sometimes sooner is better I guess. Good luck.

  7. #7

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    trainer to patternship

    Why not have a capable instructor use a buddy-box for the transition from trainer to pattern plane or anyother advanced type of airplane?

    I don't use the buddy-box, but when I train anyone, I have several low wing planes including a pattern ship that I will let any of my students fly and this might be the first week they had ever flown any RC plane.

    Which is harder, initial instruction or helping to transition a solo capable newbie via buddy-cord or whatever training method that suits the instructor? This way, the student can safely learn all of the flight characteristics of the pattern or whatever advanced plane the student wants to fly.

    Take care,
    CCR
    http://www.kites.org/rc_instructors
    www.abchobbyshop.com- information

  8. #8
    DGrant's Avatar
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    Good point,....

    Good point fliers1 and safe too. Not to mention it could save someones pride and joy.

  9. #9

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    trainer to patternship

    I have to agree on the "second plane theory" before a pattern ship type plane.
    One of the most important things we have to learn is "AUTOMATIC RESPONSE" IF YOU HAVE TO THINK TO MOVE THE STICKS, THEN IT CAN BE TOO LATE.
    I like to put someone in a second plane such as the ones mentioned above or the old R.C.M. FUNSTER or even THE BRIDI R.C.M. TRAINER. top wing semi-symetrical wing.

    THE NEW GUY NEEDS MORE TIME TO TRAIN HIS AUTOMATIC STICK RESPONSIVENESS.
    YOU DO NOT LEARN HOW TO DRIVE AND JUMP INTO A "FORMULA 1 RACE CAR"

    RON


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