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  1. #1

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    A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    Hello all. My 5 and 8 year old grandsons have taken a keen interest with all of my airplanes. I would usually have a balsa or styro hand toss glider for them to play with when they come for a visit. They always bug me to let them fly my airplanes and I say no because they don’t know how hard it is. All my planes are glow powered except for my poor beat to death fly zone “Sky Fly” which has been re-named the “Might Fly” . One day my nephew let them try out his G4 flight simulator and there it was, a Sky Fly like mine. After about a half of an hour of instructions on the sim, the 8 year old was able to handle it mostly on his own. What got me the most is that he listened and followed instructions very well. I know the simulator Sky Fly and the real one are close, but not quite. I’m thinking about getting him his own airplane but I think the Sky Fly is a little too fast and also a bit slow to respond to inputs. I would like to get an electric park flyer style airplane that would have a “Real” 4 channel radio that I can buddy box up with one of my radios. I have been looking at the great planes “Yardstick” and the GWS “Slow stick” style airplanes. The reason for these is the fact that they can take off the shelf radio sets like a Hitec or Futaba. The Sky Fly and others like it have there own radio systems and I can’t hook a trainer cord up to them. The “Yardstick” and “Slow stick” appear to be about the size of airplane I’m looking for but I know very little about park fliers and even less about electric motor powered airplanes. It looks like I’m about to take a crash course on park fliers. So cast your votes and opinions on which airplane I need to get an 8 year old snot gobbler started into this hobby. BTW, My Lazy Bee is the one my grandsons like the most. Thanks for your time. Steve
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  2. #2
    bigedmustafa's Avatar
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    I've never flown the GP Yard Stick, and I won't try to talk you out of giving one a try. I do know that the GWS Slow Stick will fit what you're looking for very well. I fly mine in gymnasiums over the winter, and outdoors at the field when winds are 15mph or less. I've buddy boxed students on mine, and I enjoy flying it myself.

    You can probably get everything you need at most any local hobby store:

    -GWS Slow Stick ARF with EPS300 motor and propeller ($40)
    -GWS ESC300 LiPo compatible 8Amp brushed ESC ($13)
    -a Spektrum DX5e radio system with buddy box jack and AR500 receiver ($100)
    -a 2S LiPo battery in the 800 to 1500Mah range (smaller for indoor flying, bigger for outdoor/windy flying and longer flights) like the Venom 2S 1320 Mah 20C ($16 each)
    -a LiPo compatible charger like the Venom 2S/3S LiPo balancer/charger ($25)

    You can spend more money for brushless power if you'd like, but the plane doesn't really need it. Your grandson will also appreciate getting extra LiPo packs once he's comfortable flying on his own.

    Feel free to post any follow up questions you might have. Good luck and good shopping!
    Electric RC planes are like non-alcoholic beer, they are OK in a pinch if the real thing is not available.

  3. #3
    Lnewqban's Avatar
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    Steve,

    Welcome to the forums!

    I believe you are on the right path for model choice.

    Many people love the Hobby Zone Super Cub, which is sort of an electrical trainer.
    Here is a long thread about it:
    http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/m_4371835/tm.htm

    However, my recommendation is to stay with models powered by internal combustion engines, if that is your experience.
    Electric power is clean and convenient, but you will need to learn a lot about it and invest in electric equipment.

    My son started practicing with my glow trainer around that age, and he soloed in short time.
    I fired the engine for him, just to be safe, and then he used to take it from that point on.

    Propellers driven by the modern powerful electric motors are not less dangerous than the ones of traditional IC trainers.

    Check these related old threads out:
    http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/m_83.../tm.htm#841482

    http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/m_81...tm.htm#8139819

    You are a very lucky man!
    Lnewqban - "God will not look you over for medals, degrees or diplomas, but for scars. He has achieved success who has worked well, laughed often, and loved much." - Elbert Hubbard

  4. #4
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    I think this link might help

    http://www.nitroplanes.com/rtf.html
    It's great2 keep flying invariably. Hitec Aurora9 2.4 GHz, Yak 54-120 XYZ 20, MXS-R RCG 20 (AMA Member)

  5. #5
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    Kids generally use the sticks as on-off switches, meaning they go from the extremes with no finesse with the sticks. For this reason, I think it might be best to start him/her off on the sim to get the basics of stick control, and to learn that they are not switches, but are proportional in nature. This would save you with many crashed aircraft and quite few bucks at the same time. It doesn't take them long to get the idea (I based this on some experience).

    After that, possibly a very light electric with some real good wing loading and decent power to fly the thing. There are quite a few around. I'm sure others will have direct recommendations for you.

    CGr.
    Skylark 70 - OS .75 AX; Excelleron 90 - OS 1.20 AX; Venus II - OS 1.20 AX; And, I still fly my trainer, Hanger 9 Alpha - OS .46 FX! Some electrics. Airtronics RD8000 - Spektrum DX7 - DX6i. AMA 705964.
    Semper Paratus!

  6. #6
    bigedmustafa's Avatar
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    Steve in MT had mentioned that he wanted something he could buddy box with his grandson, so the Hobbyzone Super Cub won't be of much help.

    He also mentioned that his 8-year old grandson had spent time on the simulator flying the Flyzone Sky Fly with Real Flight G4.

    There is a plane on the Real Flight Simulator called a BLT (Basic Light Trainer) that is modeled after a Great Planes electric park flyer kit. It flies fairly similar to the Slow Stick and might be a good model for your grandson to practice with, Steve.
    Electric RC planes are like non-alcoholic beer, they are OK in a pinch if the real thing is not available.

  7. #7
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?


    ORIGINAL: bigedmustafa

    Steve in MT had mentioned that he wanted something he could buddy box with his grandson, so the Hobbyzone Super Cub won't be of much help.
    I stand corrected; thanks, bigedmustafa.

    May be Steve could follow the approach of this gentleman to the succesful training of his 10 years old daughter:

    http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showt...ighlight=hanna
    Lnewqban - "God will not look you over for medals, degrees or diplomas, but for scars. He has achieved success who has worked well, laughed often, and loved much." - Elbert Hubbard

  8. #8
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    An EP Kadet might be a good choice - I know that my little brother (8) is more interested in flying a "realistic" airplane, and They are also easy to fly.
    "Any landing you can walk away from probably wasn't that exciting to watch"
    Sig Kadet Brotherhood #8

  9. #9
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    What about a Eagle 2 trainer? I was going to use this for my son, as I recently plowed it into the ground and will have to rebuild it. I am going to let my son help me do the rebuild and then hook him up to a buddy box and let him fly.
    Flying; Tiger 60, Eagle 2, Extra 300s, Custom Built Pattern plane
    Building; Corsair 60size, Pica Waco 1/6th, Royal FW-190

  10. #10
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    I think a GWS slow stick would be a great idea. Also check out the GWS Beaver if you want something a little that looks more like an actual airplane. Get a cheap brushless motor/ESC from Headsup RC, a couple of cheap lipos from Hobbycity and you'll be all set.

    And with the Beaver (guess you could the slow stick, too), it comes solid white, so you could let your grandson pickout a scheme and colors for it and paint it and put decals on it and really make it "his" plane and not another generic ARF.
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood #46

    http://www.BlueAppleHerps.com

  11. #11
    bigedmustafa's Avatar
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?


    ORIGINAL: LNEWQBAN


    ORIGINAL: bigedmustafa

    Steve in MT had mentioned that he wanted something he could buddy box with his grandson, so the Hobbyzone Super Cub won't be of much help.
    I stand corrected; thanks, bigedmustafa.
    My apologies to LNEWQBAN, but I just tripped across a banner ad for the new BNF version of the Hobbyzone Super Cub LP:

    http://www.hobbyzonesports.com/Produ...ProdID=HBZ7380

    This version comes with a Spektrum DSM2 receiver and no transmitter, so you can bind it to any full range Spektrum or JR DSM2 transmitter. This would of course also make it simple to buddy box.

    If granpa has JR or Spektrum radio systems now, this would make the BNF version of the Hobbyzone Super Cub LP very attractive.
    Electric RC planes are like non-alcoholic beer, they are OK in a pinch if the real thing is not available.

  12. #12
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    This won't tell you what plane to get, but its just a thought. A good trainer/instructor other than yourself is something to think about. I am not trying to cast any doubt or shadow at you, its just that sometimes kids listen to a "stranger" better than a parent. I tried to teach my daughter to fly, and she did very well, but when she was offered a flight with another pilot and his plane, she did a lot better and learned a lot. I have taught 15 - 20 people to solo and more, so I can do it. Just a thought. Again, no harm ment.
    If its not a warbird, Its just a target.

  13. #13

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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    I'd have them fly glow power. Electric is expensive. Just my thoughts.

  14. #14
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    If he will be flying with you, meaning you'll be storing, maintaining, and transporting everything... start him on whatever trainer fits your situation. I've never flown a small electric model so I know absolutely nothing about them. I know it can be windy in MT so it might be easier to learn on a bigger and heavier model.

    After he can fly around, even before he is a solo pilot, you can buddy box him on the Lazy Bee. Flying your 'cool' plane will make him enjoy it even more.
    - Carrell

  15. #15
    Lnewqban's Avatar
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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    Besides, the noise of the combustion engine may be important part of the cool factor of the Lazy Bee for the kids.
    In other words, a silent electric model may not be as appealing to the children.
    Lnewqban - "God will not look you over for medals, degrees or diplomas, but for scars. He has achieved success who has worked well, laughed often, and loved much." - Elbert Hubbard

  16. #16

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    RE: A good trainer for an 8 year old?

    Hi guys, Wow, thanks for the good and timely advice. I’ve been sitting on the sidelines here for quite some time and can usually find the answer that Im looking for. However, I needed some help on this one so I figured that it was time to come out of the closet (no, no, not THAAAAT kind of closet) and join the group. Part of my problem is that I’m thinking inside of the box too much and that’s why I’m here. I went to the Tower site and discovered that the Real Flight basic is back and that one of the airplanes is the Sky Fly that my grandson likes to fly. This setup is $100.00 ready to go. I thought that if I get him the basic simulator to start with, then he can take it home and “Fly” it until his thumbs fall off. If I get him an airplane first, then it would have to stay here and could only fly when he comes to visit, and then hope the weather is good on that day. This would severely limit stick time. So the decision is, simulator first, airplane second. Another part of my thinking on this is that if he gets good enough on the sim, then maybe I can get over the “Gotta have a buddy box” mentality. This would open up a whole bunch of airplane possibilities and also get him his own trainer at half the cost. The Yardstick and Slow stick airplanes are $50.00 bucks or less, but takes an additional $175.00 to $200.00 worth of stuff to make it fly. Go figure. Back to the Yardstick and Slow stick. Lots of research shows that the Yardstick has a weak motor and boom (fuselage) and that the Slow stick is the better of the 2. What I like about the Yardstick is the balsa wing and tail feathers. I suppose this is because I like to build and it’s a material that I know and understand. The Tower site shows that the BLT (basic light trainer) is no longer available and that’s too bad as I would build one of these. If I could get my hands on the dimensions and airfoil of the yardstick, then I would scratch build one. I had the thought of going to Wal-mart and get either a cheap fishing pole, or possibly a light arrow shaft that could be used for a boom. This approach would give me more time to research and learn more on the electric side of aircraft. If the first homemade yardstick works out, then I could use it as a base and have my grandson build and fly his very own airplane. If this all works out over time then the possibility of him building a more complex and bigger airplane like the Sig Kadet comes into play. So, those are my thoughts and I would like to hear your opinions on what you would add, subtract, or just “Plane” change. Again, thanks all for taking the time to help me out and maybe my grandson can go from snot gobbler too nitro sniffer in a short amount of time. Steve

    “Never have a battle of wits with an unarmed person”


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