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-   -   Good Nitro .40 trainer plane (http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/beginners-85/11644701-good-nitro-40-trainer-plane.html)

BrickitSAM 02-08-2018 09:16 PM

Good Nitro .40 trainer plane
 
I'm looking to get into nitro planes , Im not new to nitro and am comfortable around it, and I already have a Webra 6.5ccm or.40 engine (Got off from a friend) + some cheap standard servos and micro servos , and was wondering what would the best way to go for my first plane. I would like to keep a small budget, balsa wood would be preferred unless that's a bad idea, and what's your go-to radio, I'm willing to spend a little more on that so I don't get a piece of junk.
thanks,
​​​​​​​Samuel

ho2zoo 02-09-2018 01:58 AM

Most of the .40 size trainers fly pretty well. Really they're about the same. Except the one I DON'T like, and that's the Hobbico Nexstar. Just too many little "gimmics" and it pulls hard to the right when taking off. The Sig LT-40 is a great trainer, so is the Hobbico Avistar. You've got a good engine there, so that helps. As for radios, all the major brands are good. I've heard a lot of people at my field having some problems with Spectrum though. I've always used Futaba- don't have any problems. Be careful about using cheap and used servos, you never know what you're gonna get. Is it worth losing your plane to save a few bucks? Get a 6 channel radio. It will have more features and can stay with you into future planes. Good luck!

BrickitSAM 02-09-2018 06:44 AM


Originally Posted by ho2zoo (Post 12404772)
Most of the .40 size trainers fly pretty well. Really they're about the same. Except the one I DON'T like, and that's the Hobbico Nexstar. Just too many little "gimmics" and it pulls hard to the right when taking off. The Sig LT-40 is a great trainer, so is the Hobbico Avistar. You've got a good engine there, so that helps. As for radios, all the major brands are good. I've heard a lot of people at my field having some problems with Spectrum though. I've always used Futaba- don't have any problems. Be careful about using cheap and used servos, you never know what you're gonna get. Is it worth losing your plane to save a few bucks? Get a 6 channel radio. It will have more features and can stay with you into future planes. Good luck!

Thanks! what do you think of making your own plane? I'm also thinking of making my own plane to save on costs. Do you have any experience in FlySky transmitters? I have one for my T-maxx and it works great but don't know if they aircraft ones are any good.

wnewbury 02-09-2018 07:18 AM

IMO the best trainer is that electric foamie that comes with electronic stabilization. Comes with a Spektrum radio. I have had excellent results with my FlySky radio. I don't think you will save any money building your own plane, but you will have a lot of pride from doing it.

BrickitSAM 02-09-2018 09:59 AM


Originally Posted by wnewbury (Post 12404811)
IMO the best trainer is that electric foamie that comes with electronic stabilization. Comes with a Spektrum radio. I have had excellent results with my FlySky radio. I don't think you will save any money building your own plane, but you will have a lot of pride from doing it.

Ok thanks, I would get a lot of pride for making my own, I feel like I could do it and my father is an engineer and built a lot of model planes when he was younger so he would have some expertise in helping me make one

Top_Gunn 02-09-2018 01:15 PM


Originally Posted by BrickitSAM (Post 12404805)
Thanks! what do you think of making your own plane? I'm also thinking of making my own plane to save on costs. Do you have any experience in FlySky transmitters? I have one for my T-maxx and it works great but don't know if they aircraft ones are any good.

Making your own plane is a good thing in many ways. It's fun and if you build it yourself you'll know how to make the inevitable repairs. It probably won't save on costs, though. What with glues, covering materials, and maybe tools you'll find you need, the cost of building a model from a kit or from plans can easily be more than the cost of an ARF, and a lot more than many of the planes you can find at swap meets.

JollyPopper 02-09-2018 04:20 PM

You say you're not new to nitro so you must have been in to cars or boats, possibly a passing fancy. If flying is to be a passing fancy also, it doesn't matter much what you get. You will fly it, crash it and get out. But if flying is to be a lifelong interest, there are ways to go about it that will be more likely to succeed than others. The first thing is to get a high wing trainer as your first plane. The aforementioned LT 40 is one of the best out there. There are others such as the Goldberg Eagle 2, the Great Planes PT 40 or PT 60 and on and on. Many of these are available in either kit form or as ARFs. Kits are full build projects which means you actually take a box of balsa sticks and balsa sheets and assemble it into a flying machine. Yo will derive the most pride from these but it is expensive. ARFs are the next level, which means you will get a box of semi-finished assemblies that some little Chinese lady has already put together for you, glue them all together, and go flying.. This is less expensive and you will not be as proud of this when it is finished as you would be of a kit that you have built. Only you can decide which way you want to go. Or you can buy fully built airplanes and just go fly.

The next consideration is the radio system that you will use. There are a half dozen different brands and all of them these days are good. The choice here will depend on which name you like better and more importantly, what the guys at your field or in your club or group is using. That is so that they can help you with it. We will get more in to that later. But the secret here is that the radio system is the most important item in the process. Airplanes will come and go. Engines will come and go. But your radio system will stay with you for a long time, so my advice is to put as much money into this as you can. Then add some more money to it. You will probably start with needing four channels and go from there, but a good eight or nine channel will probably be all you will ever need. I like Futaba and Hitec. Some folks like JR. Some like Spectrum. Some like Airtronics. They're all good. And you can use these with nitro planes, electric planes, boats, cars, anything that you control with a radio. Get the best you can of whatever brand you choose and get familiar with it. Most of them will have more capability than you will ever use, and your job will be to get to know them and their capabilities intimately. Learn what the radios will do and where the switches are located like the back of your hand. Some of them will have memory for 30, 40 models or more. You use the same transmitter for multiple planes, so get a good one and learn it well.

What are you going to power this thing with? Two cycle engines run faster than four cycle engines. They spin the props faster but do no have as much torque and don't sound as good. They each have their place. What size engine you decide to power you plane with depends on how you want to fly it. I tend to like smaller engines and depend on the wing of the plane to keep the plane flying. Some folks like to use bigger engines and depend on the brute force of the engine to keep the plane flying. The first is called flying on the wing, the second called flying on the prop. You will learn all about that kind of thing and dozens of other things later.

So, ideally, what it comes down to is get a good high wing trainer plane, a name brand plane that has been proven over and over through many years to be a good plane to learn with. Get an appropriate engine, a good engine that you can transfer to a more advanced plane when you have mastered the trainer. But don't let yourself get put off by the term "trainer". These things can be a blast even after you have become a really good pilot. Every good pilot I know has at least one of these still in his hangar that he can take out on any given day and have a blast with. Many of them got rid of them as they advanced (in their own mind) but every one of them has at some point has gone back and got another one to just have fun with any time he just wants to go out for a relaxing day of easy flying. As mentioned earlier, get the very best radio you think you can afford. This is the heart of the hobby/sport, not the airplanes. A good radio and a cheap airplane will make you a much better pilot than a good airplane with a cheap radio. I will give you just one example of a good starting rig: a Sig LT 40, a Futaba nine or ten channel radio, and an OS or Saito .40 to .46 size two cycle engine or .46 to .56 size four cycle engine. Now, you won't need that much radio to fly this airplane, but you might for the airplanes to come in the future. As I said before, the airplanes and the engines will come and go, but the radio stays with you for a long time.

Now for the most important ingredient of a successful and enjoyable experience with radio control: get with a club. I have never met anyone in this addiction who was not willing to share his knowledge and help with parts and pieces to get you going. Learning on you own is very expensive and not as much fun as having buddies around. And this is not even the most enjoyable part of it. The most important part is the friendships you will make and the fun you will have at the field even on days that you might not feel like flying. There is nothing like it. I can't emphasize this part enough. GET WITH A CLUB OR GROUP OF FOLKS WHO ENJOY THIS THING AND HAVE FUN.

BrickitSAM 02-09-2018 06:14 PM

@JollyPopper, thanks for all the advice, I'm very sure I will stay with the hobby, I just love tinkering around with things :). I don't think I will get into a super fancy plane, I'm thinking just a .40 sized trainer and maybe a glider with a small electric motor to get it up instead of using surgical tubing. I would love to make my plane instead of buying it already semi-assembled, I made a small rubber band 2' plane (nothing special) a long time ago and loved the experience.
That makes sense, I'll re-think how much I can put into the plane and maybe try to pick up a deal on a really nice transmitter, I don't think I will ever need more then a 6 channel if I'm just going to do a glider and 1 trainer, throttle,ailerons, elevator, rudder and maybe flaps and retractable landing gear.
For the glider most likely a small brushless motor, for the trainer (as already said in OP post) a Webra 6.5cc, I hope the engine runs, I rebuilt the carb and ordered new bearings (old ones were beyond shot) and get new seals, the old ones are very dry but not cracked, I'm going to pick up some VP 10% fuel for it and test run it soon. By the sound of it, I'm more of the flying on the wing type of person, I'd rather have a smooth flight and just have fun with it.
I'll search for a club, I'm sure there is one around where I live, I have seen two guys go out to the park near me on Sundays and fly their planes, never have stopped by though (don't want to bother them).

flyboy2610 02-09-2018 06:38 PM

I built a Great Planes PT-40 for my first plane. It builds straight and true with no surprises. I would recommend building it with the low dihedral 'sport' wing rather than the high dihedral 'trainer' wing. I built mine with the trainer wing and found it almost too stable! It was like I was fighting it at times to make it go where I wanted it too. Build it with ailerons and learn to use them from the start. It truly is a "Great Plane"!
For radio gear I have always liked Futaba. They have given me good service with no problems.
Definitely find a club and get an instructor to help you learn to fly. Use this to help you find a local club: Academy of Model Aeronautics - AMA Charter Club Search
Have fun!

TomCrump 02-10-2018 04:17 AM


Originally Posted by wnewbury (Post 12404811)
IMO the best trainer is that electric foamie that comes with electronic stabilization. Comes with a Spektrum radio.

In my honest opinion, this type of model is the least desirable route to RC flight training. I've seen far too many pilots rely on the stabilization system, and not progress past it. If a person wants to learn RC, finding a good instructor, and following his recommendations, is the key to success.

Jolly Popper's advice is sound, and should be carefully considered.

BrickitSAM 02-11-2018 05:34 PM


Originally Posted by flyboy2610 (Post 12404954)
I built a Great Planes PT-40 for my first plane. It builds straight and true with no surprises. I would recommend building it with the low dihedral 'sport' wing rather than the high dihedral 'trainer' wing. I built mine with the trainer wing and found it almost too stable! It was like I was fighting it at times to make it go where I wanted it too. Build it with ailerons and learn to use them from the start. It truly is a "Great Plane"!
For radio gear I have always liked Futaba. They have given me good service with no problems.
Definitely find a club and get an instructor to help you learn to fly. Use this to help you find a local club: Academy of Model Aeronautics - AMA Charter Club Search
Have fun!

Ok thanks, I located a club near me (30 mins away)

Originally Posted by TomCrump (Post 12405008)
In my honest opinion, this type of model is the least desirable route to RC flight training. I've seen far too many pilots rely on the stabilization system, and not progress past it. If a person wants to learn RC, finding a good instructor, and following his recommendations, is the key to success.

Jolly Popper's advice is sound, and should be carefully considered.

Thanks, I won't get a stabilization system then.

ho2zoo 02-11-2018 11:07 PM

Good advice here. Building your plane is a good way to go! You will gain experience for when you have to make repairs. Designing and building a plane from scratch is a lot of work, and you are never sure how it will fly. Building from plans is a little better, but still a lot of cutting and shaping. I think your best bet is to build a trainer from a kit. All the parts are already there and cut out for you, and you can be pretty confident that it will fly when you are done. I started out with the Goldberg Eagle 63, the current version is called the Eagle 2. https://www.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXYXF4&P=SM
Mentioned above is the PT-40, another good plane, but I would heed his advice about building the 'sport' wing https://www.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXJ557&P=SM
And the SIG Kadet LT-40 flies very well too. https://www.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXEZHP&P=0

As for the FlySky radio- I have no experience with it. Personally I would go with a more established company, but if it works, it works.

AwwNaww 02-13-2018 03:34 PM

One thing to consider about the radio gear is it may be helpful to buddy cord with someone. In that case, it is wise to pick a brand of radio well represented at the flying field. That way, there is always someone who can plug in for training. This can be useful later on if you get into aerobatics.......it can help the first time or two with a new maneuver.

J330 02-13-2018 05:22 PM

Each person handles the training stage differently. Some can play with a simulator, and fly solo first time and every time. Some stay in a Butterfly .15 or Telemaster, and can't progress. Some never solo at all. It's not the plane as much as it's the instruction, your individual level, frequency you fly in a regular basis to progress, and the rest is subtle if anything. All trainers these days that have survived the drone world we're in now flavored with park flyers, should do the job.

I train at an open field. I currently have two adult students. One takes every other weekend off and hasn't managed to solo yet and expects me to do everything for him including provide the fuel. The other takes advice, asks questions, isn't afraid to start his own engine and program his own radio. I get a lot more enjoyment with the latter student, and he's going to make it. The other is not.

A. J. Clark 02-14-2018 07:46 AM

All good advice here. I'll just add that the Sig kadet 2 is another good plane to start with .

Hydro Junkie 02-14-2018 01:35 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Why stop there, A.J? Every one of the Kadet line of planes are good to learn with. It's just a matter of how big you want to go and how many channels you want to play with. Since Samuel already has a 40, either the LT-40 or the Mark II would be a viable option for his engine. The big differences between the two are that the LT-40 is an easier build since you don't have to carve anything like the Mark II requires but, at the same time, it costs about twice as much. Here is a link to the Sig website homepage and pictures of both planes:
Main Menu SIG Mfg. Co., Inc.

A. J. Clark 02-15-2018 04:17 PM

Reason I stopped at Kadet 2 is I always wanted one . Just never got to it. All the kadets do fly well. The kadet 2 just would be my first choice.

mkjohnston 02-22-2018 10:26 AM


Originally Posted by A. J. Clark (Post 12406378)
Reason I stopped at Kadet 2 is I always wanted one . Just never got to it. All the kadets do fly well. The kadet 2 just would be my first choice.

I have a kadet 2 in the box and hopefully I will get it built this year for sure. I started with a 2 channel ARF back in 1977 and it flew great but is not the ideal way to learn how to fly Radio Control model airplanes. My second airplane was an the first Kadet and it flew like a dream even after I ran it into a tree and hit my dads car with it etc. after each repair it just kept flying great and thats what I hope to get back to with my mark2 sometime this year!
Michael Johnston

J330 03-01-2018 01:39 AM


Originally Posted by BrickitSAM (Post 12405470)
Ok thanks, I located a club near me (30 mins away)

Curious how you're making out, did you get out to the club yet and find anything? Have you purchased a kit yet? Don't be afraid to post your build, you'll get lots of help through the process from experienced members here, or perhaps someone from your club that can offer help in person.


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