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NIGHTBREEDERS 04-15-2016 03:30 AM

Hi guys im new in the world of rc planes but need a little help im getting a Spektrum DX9 and i want to get 1of2 safe technology that you get in the hobbyzone corsair s the first is the e-flite rx safe receiver but im hearing that it does not work in warbirds but others say it does as ive watch a couple of guys on youtube and it looks great or do i go with spektrum ar636f4u safe receiver but going with this 1 i dont get retracts as ive been told by modelflite so is there somebody out there that could HELP

donnyman 04-15-2016 04:54 AM


Originally Posted by NIGHTBREEDERS (Post 12202432)
Hi guys im new in the world of rc planes but need a little help im getting a Spektrum DX9 and i want to get 1of2 safe technology that you get in the hobbyzone corsair s the first is the e-flite rx safe receiver but im hearing that it does not work in warbirds but others say it does as ive watch a couple of guys on youtube and it looks great or do i go with spektrum ar636f4u safe receiver but going with this 1 i dont get retracts as ive been told by modelflite so is there somebody out there that could HELP

Hello!

Why do you decided on one particular type radio, you will get a good radio with almost any brand, and if you are new to rc you surely shouldn't be fooling with a warbird.

not knowing your skills or if you can get proper assistance helping you would be a guess at best. judging from your comments you need someone that has been in this field for a while.

If you don't have the skills to fly a trainer you need to rethink your approach or you are about to spend a lot of money and get little result.
you can ask how I know this.

NIGHTBREEDERS 04-15-2016 06:40 AM

well look Donny im not asking you for your advise as i already no you are going to give me a crap answer but heah dont worry your pretty little head about it i will ask somebody who nose about rc planes

tomfiorentino 04-15-2016 09:21 AM

Donnyman,

I can't remember if I posted in this thread before but I am subscribed to it and have been enjoying the ins and outs of the conversation here. Nice job getting it going, thank you!

Unfortunately some people are misguided by the anonymity of the internet and so, they move away from what ought to be pretty standard social and communication etiquettes. As fast as our electronic world is, some things take a little longer to sort themselves out. I did some quick legwork because I had a minute, and in this case a pattern quickly emerged.

The vast majority of the RCU community is a respectful, thankful and generous bunch. At the same time, every bunch has it's own!

I'm not preaching to you, but don't sweat Nightbreeders response.

On another note...and consistent with this thread...it is going to be 60's, 70's for temperature this weekend and I just might shake off the winter cobwebs and make a few flights. The sights, sounds and smell of the spring air each year bring me back to when I was about 13 years old flying my Falcon 56. I built it by myself using money earned from mowing lawns. It had a Kraft 4 channel in it; OS max engine etc. A buddy of mine from school lived on an open farm about 1/2 mile from my house if I walked through the woods and a couple hay fields. We would talk in school about flying as soon as we got home. Never having a ride anywhere, I only needed to walk to his farm (sometimes holding the Falcon over my head) where I shared his flight box as if it were mine, fuel and all!

He's still one of my dearest friends today even though he has lived in Florida for the last 30 something years and he rarely gets back home to Upstate NY to visit. But, when he does, I pretty much clear my schedule, tune up my fleet of planes and love returning the favor! He can fly whatever he wants as much as he wants...and I act as pit crew fueling things up and checking batteries! The funny thing is he no longer actively flies as his life has taken him to different corners, but he still can fly better than me! Perhaps that isn't saying much!

Tom

acdii 04-15-2016 09:33 AM

Donny gave you sage advice, the same all the rest of us will. If you are new to RC flying, DON'T fly a warbird! You will quickly find it will get very expensive doing so. As for putting in one of the safe RX in a warbird, don't, those are designed only for trainers that can auto correct themselves when you release the sticks. A trainer has a high dihedral wing for a reason, it will put itself back to level (wings horizontal) flight, the SAFE will put the plane back to level forward flight, but since a warbird has little or no dihedral, the safe wont work as intended and it will fight the plane to try and correct it.

Hanger 9 sold a couple warbird "trainers" called PTS, or Progressive Trainer System. They had a T-34 and a P-51. What they did was modified the planes with more wing dihedral, and added droops on the wings to give added lift and reduce tip stall, along with more washout. They were OK, but not for a beginner either, more designed for those flying off a buddy box. I started with the T-34 and found it to be very unforgiving, so switched to an LT-40, and never looked back.

I am a good pilot and even I have trouble flying a warbird, they are nothing like the other planes like the SIG Somethin Extra, or SIG 4*120, or even a Cub or T-Clips. They are very unforgiving if you jerk them around or slow down too much. I crashed my Mustang attempting a go around after I was too far left of the runway when I throttled up and pulled back, did a high speed snap right into the ground. What happens slowly on other planes, happens much quicker on a warbird.

So take it or leave it when we tell you something, it comes from experience, not ego.

BarracudaHockey 04-15-2016 09:57 AM


Originally Posted by NIGHTBREEDERS (Post 12202506)
well look Donny im not asking you for your advise as i already no you are going to give me a crap answer but heah dont worry your pretty little head about it i will ask somebody who nose about rc planes

Tone it down please.

GallopingGhostler 04-15-2016 10:41 AM

I learned the hard way, on my own. Back in the early 1970's, I had an Ace Pulse Commander Single Channel (rudder only) RC System mounted in a 27" wingspan Top Flite RC Schoolboy, and a non throttled Cox .020 Pee Wee. But I had a large empty field with little traffic and pedestrians nearby. I crashed many times. Hardest was learning that when aircraft was approaching, my left made it move right due to orientation. Plus, I learned how interactive giving rudder would affect altitude. Plane was trimmed to climb like a free flight aircraft. Give a small amount of rudder would decrease climb, but would also increase flying speed, causing aircraft to zoom and gain elevation. However, I learned that one could effectively control the aircraft, once experience was accumulated.

Yes, I agree, one needs to build up their experience with a trainer type aircraft. Then as experience is gained, one can advance to other aircraft. Still, I enjoy the challenges of rudder only or rudder with throttle only. Also returned to control line. Recently bought a 55" span Brodak Oriental profile CL kit, rediscovering the joy of CL flight. ;)

BarracudaHockey 04-15-2016 11:05 AM

Fortunately or unfortunately, electronics have made things easier in this regard.

For example, Horizon offers a P-51 with a gas motor that because of the receiver/gyro can be quite successfully flown by a beginner with the aid of an instructor. So while it's a good rule of thumb, there are sportier models that can be flown with the help of an instructor that won't be outgrown as quickly as the typical high wing box trainer.


http://www.modelaviation.com/node/1111

GallopingGhostler 04-15-2016 11:22 AM

Oh, depends on the trainer. Some high wingers with symmetrical airfoil, low or nearly non-existent dihedral and neutral incidence setup are definitely not beginner planes. Yes, where an instructor is available, best way to go. Otherwise, if one is persistent, they certainly learn a lot in how to repair. ARF stuff varies in repairability. Some rekit themselves quite easily with little hope of repair.

I don't consider planes an investment. Until experience is gained, better to consider first planes as indispensable. One will go through several planes. Then comes along one that is just a blast to fly. Even experienced fliers crash. Just don't have the heart to invest in a costly scale job due to the temporal nature of flight, but to each their own.

acdii 04-15-2016 05:58 PM

Your talking about a foamy, not a scale warbird. Wrong forum for this, be better off asking in the ARF forum. Just because it has "SAFE" in it does not mean it can be flown by a beginner. Its a next step plane for sure. Being that it is a tail dragger, its almost a guarantee that it will ground loop for a beginner, no matter how much technology is in it.

I have an LT-40 built as a tail dragger, and I would not let a beginner fly it, as it is no longer a trainer, it will not recover as the wing is flat, and its controls are setup with large throws and it can do things no trainer can. It is one of the most fun planes I have next to my Something Extra. It can out fly most of the warbirds out there. I fly against my friend with his P-39 and fly circles around him. It out turns it, out dives it, and out climbs it.

NIGHTBREEDERS 04-15-2016 06:34 PM

i just want to apoligise to every1 here ive been going through some tuff times but i no its no reason to vent my problems onto you i love your site and i would love to stay if u will have me

GallopingGhostler 04-15-2016 06:37 PM

Trainer can be a misnomer. One can make adjustments to a trainer, minor mods to the extent it is no longer a trainer, but a really nice sport plane. That's the nice thing about this hobby, there are no limits to what one can do. Install more power, widen moving flight surfaces, change incidences, dihedral, revise landing gear, etc. Even add a second wing, make a cabin into a biplane.

acdii 04-16-2016 07:22 AM

Yeah, I'm getting good at that. Have a Biper Cub that hopefully will be ready soon. Now that will be a special sight to see.

NIGHTBREEDERS 04-16-2016 07:28 AM

what do you mean when you say a plane will ground loop

Eaglewatch 04-16-2016 10:40 AM

A ground loop occurs when a plane is veering off course on the ground, and hard application of rudder is not sufficient to straighten out the yaw path across the ground. The plane basically spins around while still on the ground.

Eaglewatch

Eaglewatch 04-16-2016 10:51 AM

Some of my old planes:

A 1/3rd scale Piper Cub (12 foot wingspan - my neighbor built it and called it a "J2 and a half"). It was built as a free-flight, uses wooden yardsticks as wing spars, and originally was powered with a .35 engine, later upgraded to a .59 engine... under-powered by today's standards. But, it was hand-launched, and could climb slowly. At 18 lbs, it was as much glider as powered plane. It is now over 50 years old, and not being used currently, but still flyable.

A seven-foot wingspan SE5A. Built by the same neighbor, but never covered completely. Design was scaled up from a rubber-band-powered stick and tissue kit (I think Gullows?) Again, plane is over 50 years old.

An 11-ft. Taylorcraft. One-piece (monster) wing. Built my another neighbor- friend, and artist who passed away last year. First R/C model I ever got to fly (at least the rudder). I was hooked for life after that. We used to land it on the county road (very few cars in those days). Partially rebuilt, not due to a crash, but due to hanger rash and a desire to increase scale authenticity and details. Has original Native-American artwork in a decal on the fuselage. This plane also 50+ years old.

Eaglewatch

spaceworm 04-16-2016 03:00 PM


Originally Posted by Eaglewatch (Post 12202934)
A ground loop ...The plane basically spins around while still on the ground.

Eaglewatch

Actually it is fun to do it on purpose. Takes a fine touch on the elevator, rudder and throttle, but you can spin it around and around on a hard surface and get it up on one wheel.

acdii 04-16-2016 04:39 PM

LOL Don't do it on grass though, not fun when the wing departs after kissing the ground when it bounces over a gopher hole.

NIGHTBREEDERS 04-16-2016 10:09 PM

hi every1 well i flew my super cub s today for the first time as i hand launched it and it took off like a dream did a few turns BUT it got a little out of my reach and just flew in to trees where i could not retreive her so i was wondering if i had a different transmitter as the 1 i was useing was a spektrum dx4e and used my new Spektrum DX9 would my plane still be with me now

Joe Fisher 04-17-2016 06:15 AM


Originally Posted by NIGHTBREEDERS (Post 12203096)
hi every1 well i flew my super cub s today for the first time as i hand launched it and it took off like a dream did a few turns BUT it got a little out of my reach and just flew in to trees where i could not retreive her so i was wondering if i had a different transmitter as the 1 i was useing was a spektrum dx4e and used my new Spektrum DX9 would my plane still be with me now

All R/C transmitters are limited to 1/10th watt. none have more power than that. With the receiver properly installed that gives up to 2 miles range in the air and about 1/4 mile on the ground.

GallopingGhostler 04-17-2016 06:32 AM


Originally Posted by NIGHTBREEDERS (Post 12203096)
hi every1 well i flew my super cub s today for the first time as i hand launched it and it took off like a dream did a few turns BUT it got a little out of my reach and just flew in to trees where i could not retrieve her so i was wondering if i had a different transmitter as the 1 i was using was a spektrum dx4e and used my new Spektrum DX9 would my plane still be with me now

Don't think changing transmitters would have helped much, stuff happens. To get your plane, depending on how high in the tree, some have taken a tennis ball on the end of a line to a casting reel and fishing pole, used such to knock a plane out of a tree. If there is an Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA) club nearby, you might get some help from them, help give you hands on flight instructions and lessons, also help you out with model selection, plus you might be able to get a good used plane someone has no longer a need for, save some bucks. Good place to inquire is a nearby hobby store if there's one nearby you.

donnyman 04-17-2016 07:38 AM

Thank you gentlemen!

My ego will heal, Maybe I need to be a bit more suttle with my responses,

I tend to not respond to many inquiries because it is so easy to be misunderstood.

That said.........When I read inquiries I try to estimate the individuals understanding of the situation and rely on them being of the mind that I wish to be helpful, not boost my ego at their expence like many do.

But just for the record and to soothe my urge to lash out, I nave been in aviation since 1947, am a rated pilot, own and have successfully flown well over 60 different model airplanes and yes I can teach you something. And buying a bigger and better radio will not make you a better pilot or keep your bird out of the trees.

I rest my case.

NIGHTBREEDERS 04-17-2016 03:01 PM

thats ok donnyman i now what you are saying and thanku for your advice but i think you are wrong about the radios as i no a better radio with more options will make me a better flyer as every guy i see on youtube never ever use the radio that came in the box otherwise who would want a new dx9 or even a dx6 nobody they would all stick with there ****ty dx4e

BarracudaHockey 04-18-2016 04:28 AM

A better radio gives you more options.

More practice makes you a better pilot

NIGHTBREEDERS 04-18-2016 05:03 AM

u hit the nail on the head


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