Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Results 1 to 7 of 7

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Juneau, AK
    Posts
    80
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    Hangar 9 pt 19 36

    Well it had been a long time since I have had anything to do with control line airplanes and my wife got me this pt19 arf with engine got it all built and with a big smile I went to send it skyward-well just as soon as my friend let it go it instantly started looping and comming at me finally it crashed and broke the fuse in half any sugestion as to should I try to rebuild or figure out a good spad design untill I relearn how to fly in a circle and did anyone else have crummy luck with thew same plane?

  2. #2
    BtnFlyGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Ayer, MA
    Posts
    246
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Hangar 9 pt 19 36

    Send me the pieces and I'll rebuld it for my collection...
    Seriously, A good monoplane profile plane in the .15-.35 range will get you up and flying again. A biplane is too draggy and will give you grief until you get your "wings" back. Asolid wing is more durable, but will get boring pretty quickly. Take a look at the Flite Streak series available from Brodak. They are quick to build and perform well as any classic should.
    Proper engine and rudder offset will help keep it from coming in on you if you fly in light breezes.
    The PT-19 you have has a reputation and not all of it perfect, so don't blame yourself. If you do rebuild, go back over the visible glue joints with some cyno-glue since there have been complaints about the strength.
    Good luck and share some pics...even the crash shots so we can do a post-mortem!
    Justin
    Once more... with gusto!

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    4,060
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Hangar 9 pt 19 36

    My first response to anyone whose airplane flies very badly is that they need to add some nose weight and move the CG forward. An aerobatic airplane is not a good first model. Something like the Brodak Lightning Streak Trainer with a 15 or 19 is about right. There are some Spad type trainer airplane plans out on the Internet. Hopefully someone will post some links.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Oviedo, FL
    Posts
    16
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Hangar 9 pt 19 36

    Without knowing anything about how the model was set up, there's no way of knowing what, if anything was wrong. Did you mechanically set up the plane when you assembled it so that both flaps and elevator are neutral when the bell crank is? Also, before flight, after attaching the lines and handle, did you make sure that the controls were neutral when the handle was? Some adjustment of the handle is typically required on a new model. If you did these, then about the only thing that could have put the plane into such behavior would be the pilot applying up elevator too early in the flight. With insufficient airspeed to maintain line tension, the model would certainly come in at you. Looping at takeoff is not an uncommon maneuver for new C/L pilots.

    The Hangar 9 PT-19 is a pretty forgiving plane that is intended to help someone get into control line flying. If assembled per instructions with the recommended Evo 36 C/L engine, it would be unlikely to turn out so tail heavy that it would do what you describe without an out-of-trim condition, or over-control by the pilot. It is, however, very stunt capable and the Evo 36 has ample power to pull it along regardless of attitude.

    As a former die-hard R/C Spadder, building a SPAD to re-acquaint yourself with the nuances of C/L flying is an excellent idea. However, keep it small. Little planes bounce a whole lot better than big ones and are a lot cheaper to build and repair. Once you've mastered a trainer and reacquainted yourself with C/L flying in general, go back to your repaired PT-19 and you'll have a whole lot more fun.

    My first recommendation, if you have access to coroplast, would bee the Man-Winn trainer

    http://www.balsabeavers.ca/begginers_page.htm

    This little plane is virtually indestructable. It has minimal parts and can easily be assembled in a weekend. Note that it uses a Cox .049 engine. Flown over grass it can take an extraordinary amount of abuse. You can get a Cox engine at http://coxengines.ca/ Get 1/2 A fuel (20-25% nitro) at the LHS or from Tower and add castor oil to get to about 20% total lube. Tower sells Klotz castor oil too and it works just fine. Modern R/C glow fuels don't have enough oil for the Cox's iron piston, so keep this in mind if you decide to go this route.

    Another great option is the Osborne platter at the Aeromaniacs web site. It's made from paper-backed foam board, that you can get just about any place that sells office supplies, and a few pieces of wood. It's not as tough as the Man-Winn Trainer, but is a lot lighter and flies better, IMHO. It's also an easy build, but unlike the Man-Winn, needs a painted finish on it. If you're not keen on that, then find a piece of coroplast and do the Man-Winn. If interested, here's where you get the info on the platter. http://www.aeromaniacs.com/Platterins.html

    Above all, don't get discouraged. C/L flying is neither intuitive nor easy. You are never more than the length of your lines away from terra firma, so things tend to happen fast and violently when they go wrong. I had a lot less trouble learning to fly R/C with a buddy box than re-learning C/L. Since I had coro, I built the Man-Winn Trainer and beat the snot out of it. My poor little Cox Sure Start ate a ton of grass, but kept on ticking. I use my trainer now to let anyone who cares to try their hand at C/L flying. Have also built a Coro-Platter (on Aeromaniacs as well), which is as tough as the Man-Winn because it's made of coroplast. That one can be made from a discarded (or misappropriated) election campaign sign with material to spare.

    Don't trouble yourself with landing gear on a 1/2 A plane if you decide to go this route. The wheels are so small they won't roll on grass anyway and just get bent up when you try to land. Just have your buddy give you a hand launch.

    Good Luck!

    Chuck
    Chuck Winget

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Madrid, IA
    Posts
    151
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Hangar 9 pt 19 36


    ORIGINAL: rayzer 13
    ....-well just as soon as my friend let it go it instantly started looping and comming at me ....
    Are you absolutely sure you didn't pick up the handle upside down?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Port Ewen, NY
    Posts
    3,375
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Hangar 9 pt 19 36

    rayzer 13,

    Your opening statement implies that you have flown CL before. With that in mind, I would suggest you rebuild it and fully check-out EVERYTHING to do with balance and alignment before launching again.

    Did you pull test your lines and check the controls for equal up and down...and that up was up and down was down? I think most of us have connected the lines incorrectly to the leadouts at one time or another.

    Someone recently wrote that a nose-heavy plane flys sluggish while a tail-heavy plane flys once.

    You have been given lots of good advice on this thread, something should help. Good luck with the rebuild, and welcome back to CL.

    George

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    c/v, AZ
    Posts
    325
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Hangar 9 pt 19 36

    I would suggest a Sig Akromaster cheap and fly's very well.I was another who got back into CL, did as a kid, got back into it at 55, i first built some scratch home builds just trying to learn as i go, then i bought the Akromaster and had lots of good flying time, learned alot with this plane.It will do all the stunts.Go to the control line kits check it out, it's only $25.00.

    http://www.sigmfg.com/cgi-bin/dpsmar...FV5.html?E+Sig


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:50 PM.

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.