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adding brackets to a metal tank

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Old 07-25-2017, 01:08 PM
  #1
straitnickel
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Default adding brackets to a metal tank

I have two metal tanks to put brackets on and a question, can epoxy hold the brackets or do they have to be soldered on? I only have a soldering pencil and am not sure it will make enough heat.
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Old 07-26-2017, 03:53 AM
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aspeed
 
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I would solder it, it will require less heat if you tin both parts first and use the higher lead content solder. I think the plumbing 50/50 kind they used years ago.
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Old 07-29-2017, 11:30 AM
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Lou Crane
 
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Hi, SN,
Depending on the model, you might get away with an alternative.
If the model(s) are profiles, you could get away with wire hooks through the body and rubber bands. Just bend an open rectangle with legs long enough to go through from inside to outside, and bend hooks. Rubber band-lash the tank(s) on. A problem - your tanks might need to shift up or down as much as a quarter inch to find where the engine runs the same both ways. (Most of us didn't know about this, back in the '50s, and cussed at the engines for not running right.... Didn't use pressure, except for Combat. That was mostly pen bladders or even pacifiers (!) and gave a lot of pressure - which was a problem of its own.)

Could make the wires wider apart than the tank, and use scrap wood shims to vary the height.

Tanks rubber banded on didn't seem to suffer as much from engine vibration as hard-mounted tanks, btw.

Otherwise, soldering tabs on does work. If you need to shift the tank up or down, you might be able to file the tab's slots a bit in the direction you want. (If it goes richer inverted than upright, then the tank is relatively too low. I.e., it's a bit lean upright, fuel must be drawn "uphill", and flipping over to inverted locates the tank "high" so fuel pours "downhill" to the NVA.)
LUCK, and enjoy!!
\LOU
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Old 07-31-2017, 04:58 PM
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The rubber band method is the classic way of attaching the tank, but I have used the method shown in these photos for some years with great success. Holes are drilled through the fuselage and servo screw bushings are inserted on the left side. Aviation safety wire holds the tank in place. The tank should not be seated directly on the fuselage, but rest on dense foam rubber or inner tube.
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