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Soldering Deans

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Old 12-19-2008, 09:11 AM
  #1
fireplug1111
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Default Soldering Deans

Questions here:

I have Soldered many things before. I need to solder Deans connectors to 16 GA wire. I cant get the deans connector hot enough or the wire hot enough to make a good connection before the deans connectors melts a little. So how do you guys do it? I tried my little 30 Watt pencil soldering gun and also my bigger soldering gun with 100 watt and 300 watt settings. I used the 100 watt and the deans connector melts.
Any tips you guys have would be great.
Alan
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Old 12-19-2008, 09:22 AM
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Default RE: Soldering Deans

I tin the Deans and the wire, first. I, then, heat the Deans to melt the solder, lay the wire on top of the melted solder and apply the iron on top of the wire. I'm sure there are many other ways that others are more than willing to share.
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Old 12-19-2008, 09:40 AM
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Default RE: Soldering Deans

I use a 60W iron, tin both the connector and the wire. I also put the connector together and then put a clamp on the opposite side of the connector to work as a heat sink to prevent the plastic from melting. I heat the connector tab until the solder melts and then lay the wire on top of it. I had problems melting the plastic until I started putting the connector together and using the heat sink. Good luck.
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Old 12-19-2008, 09:48 AM
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Default RE: Soldering Deans

Here is how I do mine:

I built a small jig by screwing two wooden cloth pins (the ones with the metal spring to open and close them).
One of the pins is used to hold the dean connector and the other one holds the wire in place.

Slip shrinking tube over the wires.
Connect the one you are preparing to another dean connector. So, if you are going to solder a male connector, plug it into a female connector. If you overheat the connector, it will not melt and it will retain its shape.
I then tin both posts on the dean connector. Don't tin the wire.
Strip the wire and, using an exacto knife, split the wire into two halfs flattening both halves (using long-nosed pliers) with the blade in place.
Slip the dean connector tab in the middle of the two halves, so that the wire fits snugly on both sides of the tab.
Melt solder on the connection until it is fully covered and looks shinny.
Slip the shrinking tube over the connection and heat it as usual.

This is perhaps a lot more than you asked for, but it really works well for me.



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Old 12-19-2008, 09:54 AM
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Default RE: Soldering Deans

I do the same thing Beaner does.

I also use the butane powered torch/iron thing. Way easier than using an electric iron and gives me the versatility of a torch too.
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Old 12-19-2008, 01:02 PM
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Default RE: Soldering Deans

DEANS ULTRA VS. POWERPOLE
While both of these are excellent connectors, some people shy away from the Deans simply because of the perceived difficulty in soldering. They can be tricky for the novice and you can easily destroy the connector if you are not careful. I prefer them due to the size, a bit more compact than the POWERPOLE. Here is the soldering technique I use.

First you need the proper tools. A 40W soldering iron with a ¼” chisel tip, iron holder, wet sponge to clean iron, helping hands, and of course some rosin core solder and solder paste. Do not use acid core solder or paste!

Fig 1. Soldering tools

Prep the Deans by tinning the positive and negative terminals on the side you will be soldering to.

(step 1) Strip the positive wire 1/8” from the end, and then twist with a rolling motion of your thumb and forefinger, the exposed copper strands so that there are no strays. Next (step 2) Tin the wire with a good soldering iron, I recommend a 40 Watt iron with a ¼” chisel tip for good heat transfer. You should also have a wet kitchen sponge and a wad of steel wool in a small can to frequently clean the tip. Lay the wire on the side of the iron tip and just touch where the wire touches the iron with rosin core solder. A word of caution here. If soldering to battery leads do ONE AT A TIME to avoid shorting the leads. Starting with the positive wire (red) take the tinned lead and compress it in a small bench vice (step 3) or with a pair of vice grips so that it forms a flat surface (step 4). This flat surface then is positioned (step 5) with some “alligator hands” on the inside surface of the previously tinned surface of the positive terminal of the Deans (the one that is crossways, usually marked “+” except on some poor quality imported copies). Oops, don’t forget to put a ½ inch piece of 3/16 dia. heat shrink on the wire before you put it in place. Now apply the freshly tinned tip of the iron to the junction of the wire (step 6) and the terminal for just a second or so until the solder flows and makes the bond (step 7) .
Figure 3. Deans soldering sequence 7-9

Once soldered, slip the heat shrink over the joint (step 8) and shrink with your heat gun. Now you are ready to do the negative connection in the same manner. Tin the terminal. Note that the negative connector (the one running up and down) is slightly offset. Position the tinned and flattened wire against the terminal where there is the most
space and solder as before. When cool slide the heat shrink over the joint and shrink it in place. There you have it (step 9) a finished battery pack. Oh, that little hole in the connector is to allow you to use snap ring pliers to separate the connectors. A little Vaseline wiped on the pins helps here also.
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Old 12-19-2008, 05:52 PM
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Default RE: Soldering Deans

RED:

Thanks for the info. That is almost excatly the way I do it even with the Alligator helping hands clips. The problem I have is that by the time the solder melts on both the wire and the Deans, the connector it is melted, and not in a good position to accept the other receiving deans connector.
I will try the method of having the deans connector in the receiving deans connector.
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Old 12-19-2008, 07:37 PM
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Red Scholefield
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Default RE: Soldering Deans


Quote:
ORIGINAL: fireplug1111

RED:

Thanks for the info. That is almost excatly the way I do it even with the Alligator helping hands clips. The problem I have is that by the time the solder melts on both the wire and the Deans, the connector it is melted, and not in a good position to accept the other receiving deans connector.
I will try the method of having the deans connector in the receiving deans connector.
Having it in the receiving connector defeats the whole thing, taking away heat from the pin you are soldering to. You have to have an iron with sufficient heat mass, 1/4 inch chisel tip on 40 watt iron is about the minimum you should be working with. Bring iron and solder to the joint all at once and then the instant solder flows get off it.
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Old 01-06-2009, 03:23 AM
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Default RE: Soldering Deans

I use Red's method except that I use a 30W Iron with one of the blunter pointed tips. I agree that the pencil or needle tip does not have enough mass to transfer the needed heat. Some of the most important items to remember are; keep the iron tip clean and well tinned, when you tin the connector tab leave a small blob of solder on the area of the tab that will contact the wire, the helping hands Red uses help a lot.

Charlie
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Old 01-19-2009, 04:21 PM
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Default RE: Soldering Deans

One obvious point not mentioned specifically... do not rush - let the 40 watt iron with 1/4" chisal tip fully heat up prior to trying to solder... the idea is to transfer enough heat as rapidly as possible to complete the solder joint - if the tip is not hot enough... you will end up slowly transfering the heat to the plastic ruining the connector in the process. If it takes more than just a couple seconds at most to flow the solder through the joint you are doing something wrong in the process. The point Red mentioned of tinning all the parts is as important as the correct heat and tip - especially having a "clean" well tinned tip. I like to see a nice wet tip with just a start of a drip of solder on the bottom of the tip... when that tinned tip hits the tinned wire - it will flow very rapidly through the wire to the connector resulting in a perfect joint every time.

Good luck and practice on scrap until you get it right!


Dan

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Old 06-09-2009, 12:36 PM
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Default RE: Soldering Deans

Nobody on this thread has mentioned one of the most important parts of soldering - FLUX

Flux removes oxidation from both the iron and the parts to be soldered, helping the solder to stick to these parts. In addition, it lowers the melting point of the solder, allowing it to flow more freely at a lower temperature.

The amount of flux in typical rosin-core solder is not sufficient to acheive this flow-enhancing effect. I cannot count how many times I melted wire insulation and created hundreds of little silver beads on my work surface before I learned to re-flux my iron between joints and to dip my parts into flux or brush it on before tinning them.

Make sure to have croosflow ventilation at the very least, as the acidic vapors from the flux are not nicd to your lungs.
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Old 06-22-2009, 12:57 PM
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Default RE: Soldering Deans


I strongly recommend you check out this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CT18mxfGRjo. Of course, therecan beminor variations ofthe techniqueshown there, but Ifound that video to be the most helpful of the manyI've searched online.

Good luck.
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Old 06-22-2009, 01:08 PM
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Default RE: Soldering Deans


Quote:
ORIGINAL: Beavis


I strongly recommend you check out this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CT18mxfGRjo. Of course, therecan beminor variations ofthe techniqueshown there, but Ifound that video to be the most helpful of the manyI've searched online.

Good luck.
It'll never work .. it looks too easy!

BobbyG

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Old 06-22-2009, 11:17 PM
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Default RE: Soldering Deans


BobbyG, I know you're kidding, but I will take the opportunity to say that the method shown on the video is the only one Iuse. It works like a charm all the time... It helps a lot to have a good quality soldering iron, preferably a range-adjustable one (dial type), as the melting point of the solder varies among manufacturers. Also, this type of iron usually keeps the selected temperature stable, whereas simpler/cheaper ones allow big temperature fluctuations, even within a single soldering session, leading to much frustration... A wider tip (e.g. chisel) also helps. Finally, flux is a must for consistency.

Happy soldering.

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