Electric General Discussion General Discussion forum about rc electric related aircraft, accessories, flight, tips, etc.

Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

Reply

Old 08-11-2004, 07:05 PM
  #76  
NotAnAceYet
Member
My Feedback: (9)
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Yorba Linda, CA, CA
Posts: 89
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

I'm new to electric - flew glow 25 years ago. At that time a field box needed a lot of things like battery for fuel pump, starter, fuel can ect. What kind of a "field box" to e-flyers use? Does somebody sell them already made?
NotAnAceYet is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2004, 10:13 PM
  #77  
Hatty
Senior Member
 
Hatty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 360
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

You really dont need much at all. The only things I take with my is my hobby tool set (allen wrenches, screw drivers, etc), DC charger, pliers, and occasionally tape and CA. That is the best thing about electric flight. It is pretty much grab and go flying.
Hatty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2004, 06:59 AM
  #78  
Matt Kirsch
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (21)
 
Matt Kirsch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Spencerport, NY
Posts: 7,349
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

ORIGINAL: bugeater

I'm new to all this, and I'm not sure if these questions are frequently asked, but anyway...

Is it normal for an Electronic Speed Control to have a Battery Eliminator Circuit built in? (I've got a ESC on order)

When your batteries are getting flat, how do you know? Does your electric heli fall out of the sky [sm=eek.gif] or what?

Thirdly, if you have a BEC and your batteries are going flat, whats to stop you from losing servo, reciever and power? Or does the power drop off before you lose the servos?
PERFECT FAQs!

Most ESCs do indeed have a BEC onboard. It's such a common feature nowadays that many manufacturers don't bother advertising it, assuming that you'll assume the BEC is there.

BECs do have practical limits, though, as they're just common single-chip voltage regulators. Refer to the instructions for your particular BEC to find its limits, but generally it must be disabled if you're using main flight batteries with more than 10 cells. An alternative means to power the receiver is necessary such as a regular 4-cell receiver pack, or a separate heavier-duty BEC such as the UBEC product.

As for your batteries, they generally do not go flat all at once. It's gradual to a point, which you will hopefully notice before the batteries completely "dump," where their energy is completely exhausted, and voltage starts dropping rapidly.

To help airplane pilots with this, most ESCs have another TLA (three letter acronym), an LVC, or Low Voltage Cutoff. This senses the voltage of the battery under load and turns power off to the motor when it reaches a preset lower limit. Helicopter pilots would be wise to time their flights, being conservative at first and gradually "feeling out" just how long they can fly.
Matt Kirsch is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2004, 07:06 AM
  #79  
Matt Kirsch
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (21)
 
Matt Kirsch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Spencerport, NY
Posts: 7,349
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

ORIGINAL: photors

I have noticed in lower voltage packs 7.2- 9.6 Volts that the NiCad and NiMh packs are not the same. It takes 1 additional NiMh cell to give the same performance as a NiCad pack. Is this peculiar to low voltage packs or is it a rule of thumb that NiMh cells do not produce the same dynamic voltage as NiCad's ?
Robert Samuel
A little long in answering this. Sorry, new job and such...

I am not sure what you mean by "not the same." Both NiCd and NiMH cells are rated for 1.2 Volts nominal and have similar discharge characteristics. They can be used interchangeably, cell for cell, in any application.

Perhaps you're thinking of that old myth that was perpetuated a couple of years ago? Somebody sent out this piece of bogus advice telling people to add a cell when going from NiCd to NiMH, and it spread like wildfire.

The reason that advice was bogus is because Volts and Amps are directly related, and that relationship is described by Ohm's Law. When you increase Volts (i.e. number of cells) without changing the motor/gearbox/prop combination, you also increase Amps. If the cells couldn't maintain the Amps at a lower voltage, how can you possibly expect them to maintain a higher current at a higher voltage?
Matt Kirsch is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2004, 10:25 AM
  #80  
Reusty2k3
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Orchard PArk, NY
Posts: 61
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

I did not see this posted yet....

suppose someone wants a certain preformance (say sport aerobatic)

Aside from using the factory recommended power system, what is the method and order used to determind the system..

IE
First decide desired preformance for a given airframe (this gives you Watt/pound)
What is the next set of variables to go through
Is their a flow chart or simelar guidelines for determining power systems, if not I suggest we all get together and make it happen!!

Thanks in advance
Reusty2k3 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2004, 11:24 AM
  #81  
Matt Kirsch
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (21)
 
Matt Kirsch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Spencerport, NY
Posts: 7,349
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

ORIGINAL: Reusty2k3

I did not see this posted yet....

suppose someone wants a certain preformance (say sport aerobatic)

Aside from using the factory recommended power system, what is the method and order used to determind the system..

IE
First decide desired preformance for a given airframe (this gives you Watt/pound)
What is the next set of variables to go through
Is their a flow chart or simelar guidelines for determining power systems, if not I suggest we all get together and make it happen!!

Thanks in advance
Actually, this process is described quite often in the Glow to Electrics forum.

After you determine how many Watts per pound you want, you determine a target weight for the airplane. Generally, airplanes come with a recommended ready-to-fly weight right on the box. The high end of the range is generally a good place to start, but if you can measure the weight of the airplane with radio gear and such (no power system yet) you can make a closer estimation.

Multiply weight by Watts per pound, and you get Watts.

Sizing the battery comes next. This is where you split the Watts into Amps and Volts. When you started out, you might've had a certain brand of motor in mind. Check out the motors' specs and see what currents they can handle, and use that value to start off with. As a general rule, I will start at 40 Amps on planes .25 size and larger because gear that can handle more than 40 Amps starts to get expensive.

Divide the Watts by the Amps, and you get Volts. At 40 Amps and higher, even CP2400 NiCd batteries have a tough time maintaining over 1 Volt per cell, so your cell count will be equal to your Volts. This has the added bonus of giving you a little extra boost in power most of the time, since the cells actually hold somewhere between 1.0 and 1.1 Volts. I like to round to the nearest even number of cells, because the "double barrel" stick packs work better with an even number of cells.

Now you have a cell count and a target current. With this information, you can go to a catalog and pick out a motor. Really, the exact motor doesn't matter much, because if the motor is too hot to spin the largest diameter prop you can fit on the plane direct drive, you can gear it down. Brushless motors are generally within a few points of each other in efficiency when you take into account the losses from gearboxes vs. the slightly lower efficiency of outrunner style motors.

Figuring out which prop size and gear ratio you need is the most difficult part. You generally want to shoot for the largest diameter prop you can. Luckily many motor manufacturers now include example setups in their literature which you can use directly, or to extrapolate what will work in your case.
Matt Kirsch is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2004, 11:49 AM
  #82  
Reusty2k3
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Orchard PArk, NY
Posts: 61
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

Thank you for your reply, heres another one....


For brushless motors what does the number of 'turns' mean?
Reusty2k3 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2004, 02:29 AM
  #83  
bob_nj
Senior Member
My Feedback: (62)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Vineland, NJ
Posts: 3,848
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default CD Rom Motors...

I know there are tons of threads on this subject. Since I am rather new at electric and am still reading other information, can you just outline a couple of things on the features and benefits of CR Rom motors?
[ul][*] Benefits (Cost Etc.)[*] Procedure - Tear down, versus buying. (http://www.gobrushless.com/)[*] Procedure - Building, rewinding etc.
[/ul]

Thank you_bob
bob_nj is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2004, 01:12 AM
  #84  
Adrian Lewer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: melbournevictoria, AUSTRALIA
Posts: 110
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

hi my name is adrian.i live in australia. i have a verey simple question but because i am a newbie i dont have a clue.
how do you calculate what sort of motor you need for a specific aircraft, what sort of speed controler,how many li po cels, what prop do i need. i heard of a calculator you can get is it any good? where do i get one .
i have got myself a himax ha2015 4100 pv, pheonex 25 controler, 3c 11.1 volt 1200ah li po pack, for hy hornet elec heli but i only bought it because it is what people recomend, i would like to know the in's and out's of electrics (especialy fixed wing) if some body can take the time and explain it to me it would be greatly appreciated..thank you...
Adrian Lewer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2004, 02:37 PM
  #85  
skater_719
Senior Member
My Feedback: (4)
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Burlington, WI
Posts: 518
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

ya , i know you guys already went through this but im still a little confused how to find wattage
skater_719 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2004, 03:30 PM
  #86  
larry1917
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: DeSoto, KS
Posts: 4
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

I've read a lot about amp draw on motors, speed controls, and battery packs. And at some point I read about how someone had used a standard amp meter to read the amp's on these. I have an Ideal clamp meter that reads AC current. As i increase speed on the motor to about half throttle the amp gage increases up to 1.8 amps. As i increase past half throttle the amp gage decreases slowly to .98 amp's just slightly before full throttle then it drops sharply to .3 amp's at full throttle. These motor, prop, and battery pack combos are supposed to draw 10 amps at full throttle. Are there any thoughts on this? Am I supposed to just move the decimal point to the right one? Any help you can give would be appreciated.
larry1917 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2004, 04:13 PM
  #87  
steedly
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Ladson, SC
Posts: 7
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

Hi all. I've been flying for about a year. I started out with a Firebird Challenger and upgraded to a Parkzone J3 Cub after losing the Challenger to the wind. I have made much progress and I feel as though I've "earned my wings" as I can usually put the plane where I want it to go, and my landings are now planned. Here's my FAQs:

-What are the pros and cons of LiPo? (I think you get more flying time from them but they are very unstable, is this correct).

-Brushed or Brushless? Why? What are the advantages/disadvantages of each?

-I have the battery that came with my J3 and I have a battery that came with my Firebird Challenger. They're made by the same people but have different connectors (Firebird has mini Tamiya and J3 has some tiny black connector that I can't find a name for). I'd like to put the same connector type on everything I have and everything I will get in the future. Is one better than the other or is there one connector type that is better than the rest?

-It looks like there are a zillion different battery cell sizes (2/3A, 4/5FA, 1/2SC, etc.) How do I tell what size the cells in my battery packs are?

-If I get a second battery for my J3 Cub, should I let the motor sit and cool for a few minutes before before popping in battery #2 and flying? The motor seems to get pretty warm after one 10 minute flight.

-How easy is it to transition from electric to glow? Is speed of the plane the main factor in the transition?

and finally...
-Wouldn't it be easier to put all of these FAQs in an FAQ sub-category in the forum rather than in one thread? That way it would be a lot easier to tell if your question had been asked or answered and easier to see all of the different questions.

Thanks for such a great place for info and help!

-Adrian
Charleston, SC
steedly is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2004, 11:54 AM
  #88  
food
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: , WA
Posts: 2
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

where do i find information about wireing of electric motors for twin engine aircraft. Brush motors is most desirable; but brushless information would also be good.
food is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2004, 02:41 PM
  #89  
Matt Kirsch
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (21)
 
Matt Kirsch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Spencerport, NY
Posts: 7,349
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

I am not sure whether it's the current issue of Quiet Flyer, or a recent past issue, but I'm reading the one I picked up at our electric fun fly last weekend and there's an article on wiring multi-motor aircraft.

With brushless, it's simple: One controller per motor, period. The behaviour of multiple brushless motors on a single controller is unpredictable at best, disastrous at worst...

Brushed motors have limitless options. All you really need is a basic understanding of series and parallel circuits.
Matt Kirsch is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2004, 11:54 AM
  #90  
jeep088
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 4
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Tail Heavy Plane

I have a Potensky Cobra (from the GREAT folks at H-L) I'm having a trim problem with. The Cobra is a EPP 4 channel (A/E/R/T) Foamie. It seems it always wants to fly tail heavy -- even at full throttle. I've checked (and re-checked) the CG and wing-tail aligment but can't find anything amiss. I also know of a coupl eother e-flyers who are having similar problems with 4channel planes. Obviously, we're all new and am looking for a few seasoned pilots to help with our problems.

Any suggestions -- that can be posted?
jeep088 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2004, 12:19 PM
  #91  
food
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: , WA
Posts: 2
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Tail Heavy Plane

Things to check
1 Is it tail hevy?
2 Is the horizontal tail insidence correct relative to the wing?
3 Is the model to heavy?
4 Is the motor in the correct trust line?
5 Is the wing loading high?
food is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2004, 01:35 PM
  #92  
jeep088
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 4
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Tail Heavy Plane

Food,
THANK YOU for you ideas!!

1. Tail doesn't seem heavy. The CG balances (slightly nose down) right where the blueprint calls for it.
2. Horizontal tail incidence looks OK using a straight edge along the wing tip/ horizontal stab
3. Model should be right on spec. I'm using recommended motor, batteries, etc. It doesn't feel heavy - relative to other aircraft I've got.
4. I'm not sure about the motor thrust line. I will check in the next day or so. I think it's supposed to be down thrust about 1-2 degrees, relative to the plane centerline.
5. Wing loading is probably high, but I would expect this from a 3D-type plane.

SAH
jeep088 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2004, 09:42 AM
  #93  
eal757
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: rochester, NH
Posts: 1
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric questions HERE!

I am new to RC Universe, and can`t find any other way to ask a question, so I will ask it here and hope fopr the best.
Is there going to be a NEAT show this year? iF SO, WHEN? The Buckster
eal757 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2004, 12:22 PM
  #94  
Hatty
Senior Member
 
Hatty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 360
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

Do you mean airshow or convention? If its an airshow, then check out your local airfield. They always have shows, at least the one by me does. Im not sure about conventions though.
Hatty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2004, 08:29 AM
  #95  
Matt Kirsch
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (21)
 
Matt Kirsch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Spencerport, NY
Posts: 7,349
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

-What are the pros and cons of LiPo? (I think you get more flying time from them but they are very unstable, is this correct).
LiPoly gives you 5 times the energy density of NiCd, meaning you can fly much longer for the same weight or the same time at a much lighter weight.

LiPoly is not "unstable." Because so much energy is packed into such a small place, greater care needs to be taken when handling and charging them. Unstable, to me, implies that something catastrophic will happen if you look at the battery wrong, and this is simply not true.

-Brushed or Brushless? Why? What are the advantages/disadvantages of each?
There really isn't any question here. Brushless have the clear advantage in efficiency and longevity. Fly a plane long enough, replace enough brushed motors, and you've exceeded the cost of a brushless motor and controller, which is practically maintenance-free.

Brushed motors' main advantage is price, in low-cost, lightweight, slow-flying aircraft like products from GWS. When you get into bigger planes, the cost difference between brushless and brushed gets to the point that replacing the motor just once makes brushless a wise investment.

-I have the battery that came with my J3 and I have a battery that came with my Firebird Challenger. They're made by the same people but have different connectors (Firebird has mini Tamiya and J3 has some tiny black connector that I can't find a name for). I'd like to put the same connector type on everything I have and everything I will get in the future. Is one better than the other or is there one connector type that is better than the rest?
It's a wise decision to use one connector for all your airplanes. Makes things interchangeable and simple. There are many good connectors out there; the important thing is that you settle on one or two. I generally use the Deans Polarized mini connectors for park fliers, and Deans Ultra for everything else.

-It looks like there are a zillion different battery cell sizes (2/3A, 4/5FA, 1/2SC, etc.) How do I tell what size the cells in my battery packs are?
You're certainly more familiar with cell sizes than you think. Ever replace the batteries in a flashlight, a toy or your TV remote? If so, then you're familiar enough with battery sizes to make a guesstimate as to what size cells you have. Flashlights and big toys use C and D cells. TV remotes and countless other electronic gizmos use AA and AAA. R/C batteries use the same sizing specifications. Fractions are a no-brainer; they indicate a fraction of the full-length cell (e.g. 2/3 AA is 2/3 as long as a AA cell). The only things you need to know are that a "SubC" or "SC" cell is slightly smaller in diameter and length than a C alkaline, and an "A" cell is slightly bigger in diameter and length than a AA alkaline.

-If I get a second battery for my J3 Cub, should I let the motor sit and cool for a few minutes before before popping in battery #2 and flying? The motor seems to get pretty warm after one 10 minute flight.
Heat kills electronic components. It's a wise idea to let the motor cool a while before taking it up again.

How hot is too hot? If the temperature of something gives you that unconfortable feeling in the pit of your stomach, it's too hot. Time to troubleshoot.

-How easy is it to transition from electric to glow? Is speed of the plane the main factor in the transition?
It depends on what you're flying now, and what you want to transition into. If you're flying a GWS Tiger Moth, and want to transition into a .40-size glow Extra 300, it's going to be tough. However, you should have very little trouble flying a typical glow-powered trainer aircraft, provided you're extremely comfortable flying the Tiger Moth.

and finally...
-Wouldn't it be easier to put all of these FAQs in an FAQ sub-category in the forum rather than in one thread? That way it would be a lot easier to tell if your question had been asked or answered and easier to see all of the different questions.
Sure it would! If you check out the beginning of this thread, my intention was to let you guys come up with the questions, and even answer most of them. Eventually, when I get time, I plan on closing this thread and compiling it into a true FAQ.

Remember that this is not a "catch all" thread where you ask all your questions. That defeats the purpose of having a forum. If you've got specific questions about specific applications, such as which motor goes with plane X, yada yada yada, post it to a separate thread.
Matt Kirsch is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2004, 04:52 PM
  #96  
wollins
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 143
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric questions HERE!

Watts ... Volts ... Amps ... CONFUSION!! :-)

I think one of the biggest areas of confusion for me is this relationship between watts, volts and amps. I understand power is amps x volts = watts.

I know that the battery delivers the volts, however how do you get the "amps" variable?

I have the impression that motors "draw" amps based on the prop selection, and the esc limits that draw so it doesn't burn the motor ... In other words ... an 8 cell battery will send 9.6 volts to the motor which will "draw" x amount of amps based on its prop. Am I anywhere close to being right or am I REALLY totally confused? :-)

If I am right how do I calculate what amount of amps different props generate based on what battery etc? HELP!
wollins is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2004, 05:24 PM
  #97  
randomvector
Junior Member
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Nashua, NH
Posts: 5
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric FAQs HERE!

I am presently running a speed 480 on 8 HAN 900 mah NiCad cells. I have a three packs of 9 cell 700 mah Nimh AAA packs, they do not perform as well as the 8 cell NiCad pack. Can I expect better performance, perhaps equalling the 8 cell niCad packs, if I were to add one more cell to the NiMh packs?
Thanks
randomvector is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2004, 10:32 AM
  #98  
adam_one
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Stockholm, SWEDEN
Posts: 410
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric questions HERE!

I know that the battery delivers the volts, however how do you get the "amps" variable?
Ampere (amps) is the electric current, which is directly proportional to Voltage (volts) and inversely proportional to Resistance or Impedance Z in case of a motor (in ohms).

electric current = voltage / impedance

The more you load your electric motor (e.g. by increasing prop diameter and/or pitch), the lower will be its internal impedance, resulting in higher current drawn.

Last edited by adam_one; 12-22-2017 at 01:43 PM.
adam_one is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2004, 12:03 PM
  #99  
Matt Kirsch
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (21)
 
Matt Kirsch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Spencerport, NY
Posts: 7,349
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric questions HERE!

ORIGINAL: wollins
I have the impression that motors "draw" amps based on the prop selection, and the esc limits that draw so it doesn't burn the motor ... In other words ... an 8 cell battery will send 9.6 volts to the motor which will "draw" x amount of amps based on its prop. Am I anywhere close to being right or am I REALLY totally confused? :-)

If I am right how do I calculate what amount of amps different props generate based on what battery etc? HELP!
The ESC doesn't limit anything. That kind of circuitry is enormously large, heavy, and expensive, three things that we don't want in our airplanes Some more advanced ESCs have overcurrent protection in them, that causes them to shut down if too much current is sensed, but most will simply burn out, or allow the motor to burn out.

You have it mostly correct, though. The voltage does play a large part in how much current passes through the motor, as does the propeller. Much of what determines how much current flows is the design of the motor: The length, gauge and quality of the wire that makes up the windings, the length and diameter of the rotor, and the strength of the magnets all play a role in how much current is drawn.

Unfortunately, there's no simple way to calculate it, no formula you can plug in the numbers and "turn the crank" on to get a prediction as to what will happen. There are simply too many factors involved, as you've seen above. It's necessary to use a computer simulation such as Motocalc, Electicalc, or the online PCalc at www.flydma.com to get an estimate, but ONLY an estimate. These programs ignore many other factors such as atmospheric conditions in your area, variations in quality, etc., that can have a HUGE effect on the behaviour of your power system.
Matt Kirsch is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2004, 06:51 AM
  #100  
Matt Kirsch
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (21)
 
Matt Kirsch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Spencerport, NY
Posts: 7,349
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Ask your electric questions HERE!

This thread has been open since May 17th, and we've received many fine questions as well as responses. I think it's time we closed this puppy so I can begin work on compiling it into a real FAQ document.

Thanks to everyone, and I mean EVERYONE, who contributed. The only stupid question is a question not asked.
Matt Kirsch is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy