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Thread: Soldering


  1. #1

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    Soldering

    Hi

    Connector attached image, because of the different size, looking to cut a part soldering.
    Please tell me if there is a better way to others.
    Motor Hyperion "ZS4045-10", is an amplifier ICE100.

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  2. #2

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    RE: Soldering

    I always cut off the pre-soldered end of the wire. You can then prepare the ends of the wire by stripping off a small section and then tightly twist the wire together and re apply solder. It will be much smaller and will fit into the 4mm connector.
    Team BJCraft

  3. #3

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    RE: Soldering

    Hi

    Thanks for the advice.
    I give it a try today.

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    RE: Soldering

    Hi,
    Do both.
    The cut-away in the side of the cup will make it easier to get a good flow of solder into the joint.

    Brian

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    RE: Soldering

    Hi

    Brian

    It is OK.
    I'll do both.

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    RE: Soldering

    If it is stock ICE 100, get a good soldering paste, dip the end to the paste. Use iron that is at least 40 watt. Heat it up and touch the end of the wire.

    It will make the solder to melt and go in the wires. If the entire wires too thick, use dremel sanding drum to make the outside diameter of the tinned wire thinner.


  7. #7
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    RE: Soldering

    I wish CC didn't put so much junk in the wires
    Joe Marri
    Enjoying all things aviation.

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    RE: Soldering

    Larger connectors ???????????????????

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    RE: Soldering

    Hi

    It is a basic question.
    Temperature at which the solder the leads of the amplifier is again?

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    RE: Soldering

    Actually, it would probably help us mug punters if Castle (and other manufacturers) didn't tin the ends of the leads for us.

    For ROHS compliance I'd expect that they'd be using lead free solder which just makes soldering more difficult (higher temperature and poorer flowing) for the average hobbyist than the good 'ol tin/lead solder that 99% of us use.

    I tend to set my iron (wattage?) to about 400degC with a 4mm chisel tip to get the heat into the job fast and get out quick...

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    RE: Soldering

    Yep, no substitute for specific heat capacity, i.e. a BIG chunk of copper as your element. Mine is the size of my index finger. and once it's hot it'll solder just about anything, including humans, balsa wood, work benches, etc.
    Go knife edge your cub!

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    RE: Soldering

    This 80 watt iron with the large end will hold enough heat to instantly solder EC 5 and 6 connectors http://www.amazon.com/Weller-80-Watt.../dp/B00018AR3Q

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    RE: Soldering

    I used to use 2 different soldering irons, but changed to an adjustable output soldering station with three different tips.
    So far, I gave away most of those pen type soldering irons. I kept that takes #11 blade.

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    RE: Soldering

    I just retird from the aerospace industry and I was certify for training trainers and trainess to MIL-Std-2000. The Aerospace Military industry does not use ROHS due to tin whiskering by the ROHS solder. Tin Whiskering is like roots growing out the solder alone a pc board. This will sooner or later hit another trace and cause shorting.

    A good active flux and 60-40 solder will do the trick.




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    RE: Soldering

    oh almost fogot, always clean the solder joints with alcohol and remove all flux. That will insure no problems later.
    [X(]

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    RE: Soldering


    ORIGINAL: Walfam
    I just retird from the aerospace industry and I was certify for training trainers and trainess to MIL-Std-2000. The Aerospace Military industry does not use ROHS due to tin whiskering by the ROHS solder. Tin Whiskering is like roots growing out the solder alone a pc board. This will sooner or later hit another trace and cause shorting.

    A good active flux and 60-40 solder will do the trick.
    Pinched from elsewhere by some bloke at Castle that should know:
    "We do use lead free solder on all of our controllers now. I set my Weller WES51 to 850F+ (past the 850 mark so not sure what that is). It will help if you actually place the soldering iron on the wire, and then add some solder to the wire/soldering iron. This will help liquefy the lead free solder, and make soldering it to the Deans connector much easier. Hope this helps."

    I agree, lead free wouldn't be my first choice for something over the long haul or in a harsh environment but it helps to recognise it when you come across it. Ever replaced your mates roll of solder with tinned copper wire and watched him crank up the temperature trying to get it to melt?

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    RE: Soldering


    ORIGINAL: bjr_93tz




    I agree, lead free wouldn't be my first choice for something over the long haul or in a harsh environment but it helps to recognise it when you come across it. Ever replaced your mates roll of solder with tinned copper wire and watched him crank up the temperature trying to get it to melt?
    not yet...
    Go knife edge your cub!

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    RE: Soldering


    ORIGINAL: bjr_93tz


    ORIGINAL: Walfam
    I just retird from the aerospace industry and I was certify for training trainers and trainess to MIL-Std-2000. The Aerospace Military industry does not use ROHS due to tin whiskering by the ROHS solder. Tin Whiskering is like roots growing out the solder alone a pc board. This will sooner or later hit another trace and cause shorting.

    A good active flux and 60-40 solder will do the trick.
    Pinched from elsewhere by some bloke at Castle that should know:
    ''We do use lead free solder on all of our controllers now. I set my Weller WES51 to 850F+ (past the 850 mark so not sure what that is). It will help if you actually place the soldering iron on the wire, and then add some solder to the wire/soldering iron. This will help liquefy the lead free solder, and make soldering it to the Deans connector much easier. Hope this helps.''

    I agree, lead free wouldn't be my first choice for something over the long haul or in a harsh environment but it helps to recognise it when you come across it. Ever replaced your mates roll of solder with tinned copper wire and watched him crank up the temperature trying to get it to melt?

    Is that like replacing a buddys stick welding rod with a sparkler??????????

  19. #19
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    RE: Soldering


    ORIGINAL: shannah

    I always cut off the pre-soldered end of the wire. You can then prepare the ends of the wire by stripping off a small section and then tightly twist the wire together and re apply solder. It will be much smaller and will fit into the 4mm connector.
    Another way to achieve the same is to file the tin/solder off from the ore-soldered end, from all sides, until the tip can drop into the 4mm connector socket easily.

    With the above step done, preheat the socket and fill it with enough solder, while keep the tip of soldering iron touch the socket (the solder boils inside the socket). Push the wire tip into the boiling solder, withdraw the iron tip, and hold the wire tip steady, until it cools down.
    Where facts are few, experts are many.
    Perfection is God\'\'\'\'s business.

  20. #20

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    RE: Soldering


    ORIGINAL: Propworn

    ORIGINAL: bjr_93tz
    I agree, lead free wouldn't be my first choice for something over the long haul or in a harsh environment but it helps to recognise it when you come across it. Ever replaced your mates roll of solder with tinned copper wire and watched him crank up the temperature trying to get it to melt?
    Is that like replacing a buddys stick welding rod with a sparkler??????????
    Quite the opposite I think, I guess electronic folk get their jollies in a far less spectaclar fashion than the boilermakers?

    I'd be happy with just turning the gas down on their MIG or TIG.


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