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nOOb plane Q

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Old 01-12-2004, 08:11 PM
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potatoe_bird
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Default nOOb plane Q

So I should start out with a park flyer, right? How fast do they go?

edit: not to sound stupid but what is 3D flying?
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Old 01-13-2004, 08:02 AM
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Matt Kirsch
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Default RE: nOOb plane Q

You don't necessarily have to start out with a park flier, but there are a few advantages:

1. You don't have as much money invested. A large electric will cost several hundred dollars. Glow planes run in the $400-$500 range to get properly outfitted. Beginner park fliers can be completely outfitted for $300 or less.
2. Beginner park fliers are slow and stable, giving you a better chance at success without an instructor.
3. Beginner park fliers are durable, giving you a better chance at success without an instructor.
4. Beginner park fliers are small and quiet, allowing you to fly in most open spaces, but please, try not to fly over people or houses, especially when you're starting out. That's a sure formula for getting airplanes banned from that area, and we need to be making friends, not enemies.

Speed is going to depend on the plane. Most beginner park fliers move at slightly more than a walking pace. This makes them difficult to fly in wind, though, so wait for a calm evening to fly. There are more advanced park fliers that fly much faster, and have much higher performance levels; park fliers are not just for beginners, and aren't necessarily slow

3D flying... Well, there's are entire forums dedicated to 3D flying that could better answer your question, but here goes. 3D is an extreme form of extreme aerobatics where the plane moves in directions and ways you wouldn't think possible. Most 3D maneuvers would kill a pilot in a full scale airplane, or are simply impossible in a full scale airplane because they can't get the power to weight ratio, and light wing loadings we can in our models. The most popular 3D maneuver is "hovering," where the plane hangs by the propeller. It's an impressive maneuver, the first time you see it. Hovering is not the only 3D maneuver, though.
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