Electric Training If you are new to electric learn more about them here or ask questions.

Six Keys to Success for new pilots

Reply
Old 04-04-2005, 08:23 AM
  #1
aeajr
Thread Starter
 
aeajr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 8,546
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Six Keys to Success for new pilots

Whether you have a coach or you are trying to learn to fly on your own, you
will need to be mindful of these six areas if you are going to become a
successful RC pilot. After two years of working with new flyers at our club,
and coaching flyers on the forums, there are a few things I have seen as the
key areas to stress for new pilots. Some get it right away and some have to
work at it. They are in no particular order because they all have to be
learned to be successful.

WIND
Orientation
Speed
Altitude
Over Control
Preflight Check

1) Wind - The single biggest cause of crashes that I have observed has been the
insistence upon flying in too much wind. If you are under an instructor's
control or on a buddy box, then follow their advice, but if you are starting
out and tying to learn on your own, regardless of the model, I recommend dead
calm to 3 MPH for the slow stick and tiger moth type planes. Under 5 MPH for
all others. That includes gusts. An experienced pilot can handle more. It is the pilot, not hte plane that determines how much wind can be handled.

The wind was around 8 mph steady with gusts to 12. That was strong enough that some of the experienced pilots flying three and four channel small electric planes chose not to launch their electrics. This new flyer insisted that he wanted to try his two and three channel parkflyers. Crash, Crash, Crash - Three planes in pieces. He just would not listen. Sometimes you just have to let them crash. There is no other way to get them to understand.

Many parkflyers can be flown in higher winds by AN EXPERIENCED PILOT. I
have flown my Aerobird in 18 mph wind (clocked speed) but it is quite exciting
trying to land it.

Always keep the plane up wind from you. There is no reason for a new flyer to
have the plane downwind EVER!


2) Orientation - Knowing the orientation of your plane is a real challenge,
even for experienced pilots. You just have to work at it and some adults have
a real problem with left and right regardless of which way the plane is going.
Licensed pilots have a lot of trouble with this one as they are accustomed to
being in the plane..

Here are two suggestions on how to work on orientation when you are not
flying.

Use a flight simulator on your PC. Pick a slow flying model and fly it a lot.
Forget the jets and fast planes. Pick a slow one. Focus on left and right
coming at you. Keep the plane in front of you. Don't let it fly over your
head.

FMS is a free flight simulator. It is not the best flight sim, but the price
is right and it works. There are also other free and commercial simulators.


The links below take you to sites that provide cables that work with FMS that
allow you to use the trainer port on your radio to allow you to fly the
simulator. This is an excellent training approach.

http://www.mattclement.freeservers.com/fms/fms.html
http://www.simblaster.com/
http://www.customelectronics.co.uk/

An alternative is to try an RC car that has proportional steering. You don't
have to worry about lift, stall and wind. Get something with left and right
steering and speed control. Set up an easy course that goes toward and away
from you with lots of turns. Do it very slowly at first until you can make
the turns easily. Then build speed over time. You'll get it! If it has
sticks rather than a steering wheel even better, but not required. Oh, and
little cars are fun too.


3) Too much speed - Speed it the enemy of the new pilot but if you fly too
slowly the wings can't generate enough lift, so there is a compromise here.
The key message is that you don't have to fly at full throttle all the time.
Most small electrics fly very nicely at 2/3 throttle and some do quite well at
1/2. That is a much better training speed than full power. Launch at full
power and climb to a good height, say 100 feet as a minimum, so you have time
to recover from a mistake. At 100 feet, about double the height of the trees
where I live, go to half throttle and see how the plane handles. If it holds
altitude on a straight line, this is a good speed. Now work on slow and easy
turns, work on left and right, flying toward you and maintaining altitude.
Add a little throttle if the plane can't hold altitude.


4) Not enough altitude - New flyers are often afraid of altitude. They feel
safer close to the ground. Nothing could be more wrong. Altitude is your
friend. As stated above I consider 100 feet, about double tree height where I
live, as a good flying height and I usually fly much higher than this. Fifty
feet, is minimum flying height. Below that you better be lining up for
landing.


5) Over control - Most of the time the plane does not need input from you.
Once you get to height, a properly trimmed plane flying in calm air will
maintain its height and direction with no help from you. In fact anything you
do will interfere with the plane.

When teaching new pilots I often do a demo flight of their plane. I get the
plane to 100 feet, then bring the throttle back to a nice cursing speed. I get
it going straight, with plenty of space in front of it, then take my hand off
the sticks and hold the radio out to the left with my arms spread wide to
emphasize that I am doing nothing. I let the plane go wherever it wants to
go, as long as it is holding altitude, staying
upwind and has enough room. If you are flying a high wing trainer and you
can't do this, your plane is out of trim.

Even in a mild breeze with some gusts, once you reach flying height, you
should be able to take your hand off the stick. Oh the plane will move around
and the breeze might push it into a turn, but it should continue to fly with
no help from you.

Along this same line of thinking, don't hold your turns for more than a couple
of seconds after the plane starts to turn. Understand that the plane turns by
banking or tilting its wings. If you hold a turn too long you will force the
plane to deepen this bank and it will eventually lose lift and go into a
spiral dive and crash. Give your inputs slowly and gently and watch the
plane. Start your turn then let off then turn some more and let off. Start
your turns long before you need to and you won't need to make sharp turns.

I just watch these guys hold the turn, hold the turn, hold the turn, crash.
Of course they are flying in 10 mph wind, near the ground, coming toward
themselves at full throttle.

6) Preflight check - Before every flight it is the pilot's responsibility to
confirm that the plane, the controls and the conditions are correct and
acceptable for flight.

Plane - Batteries at proper power
Surfaces properly aligned
No damage or breakage on the plane
Everything secure

Radio - Frequency control has been met before you turn on the radio
A full range check before the first flight of the day
All trims and switches in the proper position for this plane
Battery condition is good
Antenna fully extended
For computer radios - proper model is displayed
All surfaces move in the proper direction

Conditions - No one on the field or in any way at risk from your fight
You are launching into the wind
Wind strength is acceptable ( see wind above )
Sunglasses and a hat to protect your eyes
All other area conditions are acceptable.

Then and only then can you consider yourself, your plane, radio and the
conditions right for flight. Based on your plane, your radio and local
conditions you may need to add or change something here, but this is the bare
minimum. It only takes a couple of minutes at the beginning of the flying day
and only a few seconds to perform before each flight.

If this all seems like too much to remember, do what professional pilots do,
take along preflight check list. Before every flight they go down
the check list, perform the tests, in sequence, and confirm that all is right.
If you want you flying experience to be a positive one, you should do the
same. After a short time, it all becomes automatic and just a natural part of
a fun and rewarding day.

I hope some of this is useful in learning to fly your plane.
aeajr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2005, 11:40 AM
  #2
Safety Hawk
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: White Stone, VA
Posts: 759
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

These are good tips. I would like to add one more thing to the "Orientation" step. This helped me when I was learning. When the plane is coming at you, stand so that you are looking over your shoulder at it and the controller is positioned so that right is still right and left is still left. Easier to do than explain.
Safety Hawk is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2005, 02:24 PM
  #3
YOGIGURU
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: LONGVIEW, WA
Posts: 77
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

And when flying inverted stand on your head?
YOGIGURU is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2005, 06:31 PM
  #4
warhwk
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Knoxville, TN
Posts: 652
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

Beginners...listen up. Aeajr's advice is well worth heeding. I have only a couple of points I would like to add to this great post.

First. Orientation is usually lost when flying toward yourself. ALWAYS move the aileron stick toward the LOW wing when flying toward yourself. No thinking involved! This instinct will come later.

Second. When turning, say to the left as an example; say out loud "left" "left" "left". This way your brain will be ready to correct "right" when leveling out and vice-versa.

These two points can help keep you out of danger when turning toward you, one wing low, then trying to correct the wrong direction. This type of common mistake will put the plane spinning straight down in a micro-second before you can even figure out what you did wrong.

Good luck to all you beginners. We want you to succeed!
warhwk is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2005, 09:26 PM
  #5
aeajr
Thread Starter
 
aeajr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 8,546
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

Great post Warhawk! Thanks for adding such valuable advice.

Safety Hawk, that is an approach I have heard works very well for beginners. In short order you no longer need it, but it can really help you for those first few flights. Great tip!
aeajr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 07:56 AM
  #6
aeajr
Thread Starter
 
aeajr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 8,546
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

This post has been very popular on other sites.  Let's bring it back to the top and see if it can help pilots here too.
aeajr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 08:58 AM
  #7
scale only 4 me
 
scale only 4 me's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Avon Lake, OH
Posts: 9,600
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

I'd like to add a comment on Orientation

This is just something you can try if the Warhlk's post.
Quote:
Orientation is usually lost when flying toward yourself. ALWAYS move the aileron stick toward the LOW wing when flying toward yourself. No thinking involved! This instinct will come later.
doesn't work for you

When I learned to fly r/c it was on a slope hill, my instructor said, always point the antenna the direction the plane is heading. At first I'd be going 90 deg back and forth, but of course over the years the amount of my body/radio turn became less and less and more and more subtle to the point now (30 years later) it's just something in the back of my mind. Also, this is easier on a slope hill as you're almost always turning away from the hill, not back inside towards yourself.
scale only 4 me is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 11:59 AM
  #8
Lnewqban
 
Lnewqban's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: South Florida
Posts: 4,039
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

Great post and thread, aeajr; we don't have enough of piloting techniques here in RCU, I believe.

For me, learning to trim the model properly, is a great knowledge and skill for any student, the sooner the better.
Many students have soloed knowing near to zero about trimming, including myself.

Trimming is a required skill for free flyers, that we RC pilots tend to overlook.

About speed:
Management of energy is an important concept to be learned early in the process.
Good for gliders, for aerobatics and also for dead stick landings, if fuel is to be tried.

About over control:
I believe that for other than 3D flying, elevator use is frequently abused and misunderstood.
Years ago, I received what I believe was a great advice: try to fly a four-channel trainer, using only rudder and throttle, just until before flare.
From that excercise I learned how to manage altitude with change of airspeed only (instead of AOA only via elevator), and not less important, that my left thumb had work to do in each flight.
Lnewqban is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2010, 12:17 PM
  #9
aeajr
Thread Starter
 
aeajr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 8,546
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots


Quote:
ORIGINAL: LNEWQBAN

Great post and thread, aeajr; we don't have enough of piloting techniques here in RCU, I believe.

For me, learning to trim the model properly, is a great knowledge and skill for any student, the sooner the better.
Many students have soloed knowing near to zero about trimming, including myself.

Trimming is a required skill for free flyers, that we RC pilots tend to overlook.

About speed:
Management of energy is an important concept to be learned early in the process.
Good for gliders, for aerobatics and also for dead stick landings, if fuel is to be tried.

About over control:
I believe that for other than 3D flying, elevator use is frequently abused and misunderstood.
Years ago, I received what I believe was a great advice: try to fly a four-channel trainer, using only rudder and throttle, just until before flare.
From that excercise I learned how to manage altitude with change of airspeed only (instead of AOA only via elevator), and not less important, that my left thumb had work to do in each flight.
Due to a preflight screw up on my part, not long ago, I actually had to fly one of my gliders this way. It is a R/E throttle design. I had not properly secured the elevator connection. I took off and climbed to height on throttle, with no problem as this plane tends to nose up on high throttle. But when I powered off, I discovered I had not elevator control at all.

No problem. I could steer with the rudder and, by going into steep bank, I could lose altitude with rudder alone.After the inital climb, I never used the motor again. I circled the field twice, bled off some altitude with the rudder, then brought it in for a nice smooth landing.

In retrospect I could have used minimul throttle to create drag to help control the glide path, but I didn't need it.

You can do a lot of flying on the rudder alone. ;-)

aeajr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2010, 01:52 PM
  #10
milehighjc
 
milehighjc's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Longmont, CO
Posts: 29
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

I am one of the beginners... 

I bought a HZ super cub a few weeks ago, and this past Sunday was the first trip out (of three) that didn't end with with the SC in pieces (Hooray!).  There were four flights, five landings (heh heh, meaning one BIG bounce when I accidentally goosed the throttle on touchdown).  I think the advice here is EXCELLENT, and was very helpful.

I spent a fair amount of time with FMS (which really helped with teh control "inversion" issue) - probably 5-6 hours of fooling around with it.    Im now acrobatic on FMS, not so much with the real controller in my hands.     

I did one other thing that I think helped a LOT... I did a lot of taxiing.    I took the S/C out into my cul-de-sac - a big square expanse of blacktop.   I "flew" countless patterns there - downwind, base, final.   It helped more with the control inversion, as well as allowed practice with minimized control inputs - big control inputs almost always ended with me over correcting, so I learned NOT to do that.

The end result was that I managed to touchdown on the street the FIRST time I actually tried, because I only really had to think about altitude and speed.     Out of 4 landing attempts, I was able to touch down on the street three times, the other one I got a bit of a gust that blew me into tall grass.

Net : For me, I think the SIM and taxi time were invaluable...

jc




milehighjc is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2010, 09:54 PM
  #11
aeajr
Thread Starter
 
aeajr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 8,546
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

JC,

Great report and great advice.

aeajr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2010, 10:10 PM
  #12
russ_hillis
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Coronation, AB, CANADA
Posts: 139
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

definitely a big thanks for pointing us newbs towards FMS. Hopefully they'll get it up to Vista / 7 speed soon.
russ_hillis is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2010, 11:12 AM
  #13
Leisure_Shoot
 
Leisure_Shoot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: S Charelston, OH
Posts: 45
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

I learned the hard way (although it was cheap) about pre-flight checks. [&:]

Sent my Super Cup up with the antenna collapsed on the transmitter.  Got about 150 feet away and the engine cut out and the plane nosed into the ground, breaking the firewall, gearbox, prop, and wing struts, and cracking the fuselage slightly.

It was a good training exercise that cost me about $20 bucks, and I'll never  (yeah right) make that mistake again. So I am grateful this occurred in such an insignificant way, rather than forgetting something on a balsa and plywood expensive plane.
Leisure_Shoot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2010, 07:37 AM
  #14
aeajr
Thread Starter
 
aeajr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 8,546
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

Since all the new pilots in this forum fly electric, let me point you to this resource which can be found on RCUniverse.  This e-book should answer a lot of questions about electric powered flight.

EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT ELECTRIC POWERED FLIGHT
aeajr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2011, 06:45 PM
  #15
natanw6xr
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: freeville, NY
Posts: 2
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots



I have years of practice on nitro, gas and even Diesel powered RC planes starting in the 1950's.  Getting old I'm now started to begin a ccareer flyng Electric airplanes, started with a memorimal Vietnam type L-4 type Piper J Cub flown to his death in 1968 while doing FAC by a dear friend. I purchased a ARF from China having a 72" wingspan with aerilons, flaps, elevators, rudder and throttle.

The specs for which i have no understanding for as follows are:

Motor 3548-890 KW What does this nomenclature mean and wha is a good produt to purchase?

The ESC calls for a 50A.  Does anyne have a good suggestion for the aelectronic speed acontrol?  I suspect the the ESC is capable of 50 watts.

Finally,  What are  good LIPO good batteries to invest in?

Thanks for any suggestions and I'm looking for THE ELECTRIC flying season.

Regards,

Natan Huffman
Freeville, NY

natanw6xr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2011, 02:05 PM
  #16
aeajr
Thread Starter
 
aeajr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 8,546
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

PREFLIGHT AND FIRST FLIGHT PROCEDURES FOR PARKFLYERS
by Ed Anderson
aeajr on the forums
 
Here are some quick tips and a "check sheet" for preparing your parkflyer
for launch.  If you are a new pilot, you really need to heed the wind
caution. If you are experienced, use your own judgment.
 
Here is how you prepare for your first flights.  Skip a step and you open
yourself to problems.
 
Respect the wind - For new pilots, dead calm to 3 MPH is perfect.  No more
than 5 MPH for early/training flights or you will be fighting the wind, not
flying the plane.
 
1)  Make sure no one is on your channel BEFORE you turn on your radio.  If
someone is flying on your channel and you turn on your radio, they will
crash! Check first!  If you are on 2.4 GHz, you can skip this step.
 
2) Do a range check before the first launch of the day
 
3) Make sure that battery is fully charged just before the launch.  Not 3
days ago.  Not last week.  I mean, last night or today!
 
4) Make sure all your surfaces are properly aligned and move properly before
you launch.  Check the manual if the surfaces do not appear to be properly
aligned.  Also make sure your wing is straight!  Check the linkage
connections
to be sure they are secure
 
 
5) CHECK THE TRIMS!  Check the trim slides on the side and below the
stick(s). Be sure you have not bumped one out of position.  A bumped trim
can cause the plane to crash.  Make sure the surfaces are properly aligned
on the tail and the wings.
 
6) Always launch and land into the wind - ALWAYS
 
7) If you are hand launching, - good firm level throw or only very slightly
up.  Never throw the plane upward - Typically you use full throttle.  If
this is an e-glider, part throttle might be a better choice.
 
8) Let it fly out and gain speed.  I would say a minimum of 50 feet, and 100
would be better.  From a hand throw, it will drop a bit, that is OK.  It
should start to climb all on its own.  If you use the elevator, only use a
small amount.
 
The plane must get up to speed before applying strong elevator.  Apply the
elevator too soon and you will "stall" the wing, the nose will drop and you
will crash.
 
IF THIS IS YOUR FIRST FLIGHT AND YOU ARE LEARNING ON YOUR OWN
 
If your field will allow it, launch, fly out 100 feet or so then come back
to about 1/4 throttle and let the plane drift down for a landing  straight
ahead.  Just before the plane touches the ground, cut the motor.
 
Use the rudder to keep it straight.  Avoid turns.  Do this a few times till
you understand how the plane launches and lands.  Then you can go for climbs
and turns.
 
I fly electrics and gliders.  With my gliders, I ALWAYS do a test glide,
with a hand throw, straight out then glide to the ground before launching
off the hi-start or the winch. This confirms that the plane is balanced and
everything works right. Good idea for electrics as well using that straight
out launch, under power, then land. Saves much damage and embarrassment.
 
If the plane is properly trimmed, it should climb on its own at full
throttle or require only a small amount of up elevator.
 
Use the elevator carefully!  Unless you are going for a loop, use small
elevator inputs.  Too much up elevator with the plane flying too slowly will
cause the nose to rise, the wing to stall and the nose to drop.  Do this
near the ground and you crash.
 
Flight tips
 
Keep your control movement smooth and don't over do it.  Turn before you
need to so you can give the plane time to react. This is called thinking
ahead
of the plane.  Plan you moves.
 
For three channel parkflyers that use rudder/elevator or two channels that
only have rudder, don't hold rudder commands for more than a couple of
seconds.  On these planes, rudder commands will cause the plane to bank, or
tip over in the direction of the turn.  That is good because that is how
they turn.  However, if you hold the rudder too long, the
bank will continue to steepen to the point where the wing will lose lift and
you will go into a dive or spiral in for a crash.
 
Of course you read the whole manual several times and watched any videos
that might have come with the plane before you fly.
 
Here are some other tips you might find helpful:  Six Keys to Success
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=18
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=355208#post3551513
 
> Throwing up will make you sick - read from the first post
http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/m_3267744/anchors_3708346/mpage_1/key_/anchor/tm.htm#3708346
 
 
Clear Skies and Safe Flying!
aeajr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2011, 10:17 PM
  #17
rcrunnerdawn
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Hesperia, CA
Posts: 22
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

Ahh! these are always helpful! Thanks
rcrunnerdawn is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 02:46 PM
  #18
aeajr
Thread Starter
 
aeajr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 8,546
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Six Keys to Success for new pilots

Here is one that has caught many a new pilot.

THE ILLUSION OF THE DOWN WIND TURN


This downwind turn thing comes up from time to time. Others try to explain it in terms of airplanes. If you GET it, don't read this. if not, maybe this will help. Think boat on a river. Water is a fluid, just like air, but you can see it. A lot more people have been in and driven boats than have piloted aircraft. So let's give this a try.

Your only steering control is the rudder. It only works if it is moving through the water. If you are stationary in the water there is no flow over the rudder so it doesn't do anything. If you are sitting in a still pond and move the rudder, nothing happens.


The river is flowing downstream at 10 mph relative to the shore. You are floating on the river with no engine or wind power. Relative to the water your speed is zero. This is identical to floating on that still pond since you are moving with the water. Relative to the land you are moving at 10 mph, but who cares. Your rudder doesn't know that. All it knows is that there is little or now water flow around it. You could be sitting in a still pond or you could be floating on a river. Same thing to the rudder.

You use a paddle to turn the nose of the boat so it faces up stream. You are now drifting backwards. But your rudder still has no control as it is still moving with the water. Doesn't matter which way you face. It is the movement of the rudder THROUGH the water that allows you to steer the boat with the rudder. Meanwhile the land continues to go buy.

You toss out an anchor. Your speed relative to the water is now 10 mph as that is how fast the water is flowing. It is still doing 10 but, you are stationary compared to the river bank. Relative to the water you are moving at 10 mph. NOW your rudder can wag the back of the boat and steer as water is flowing over it. Your land speed is zero, but who cares. Your water speed is all that matters.

You pull in the anchor and start to drift with the water again. No rudder authority at all! Do you know why?
You face the boat down river and turn on the engine and manage to get moving at 10 mph RELATIVE TO THE WATER. Who cares what your land speed, the rudder only cares about the water.

Since you are moving relative to the water your rudder works again. In fact it is just about as effective as it was when you were anchored.
What have we learned?

Land speed means nothing. Water speed means everything.
Airplanes?

Land speed means nothing. Air speed means everything. There is no down wind change in the handling of the plane. There is only air speed, your speed relative to the air. How it looks from the ground means nothing.
Any questions?


Last edited by aeajr; 07-01-2014 at 02:22 PM.
aeajr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2014, 02:07 PM
  #19
laknox
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 27
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Ed, one thing from your checklist, that I found out the hard way, is to check the CG! You really should add that to your checklist. Swapping batteries or receivers without re-balancing can cause you grief. Again, thanks for this link.

Lyle
laknox is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2014, 02:35 PM
  #20
aeajr
Thread Starter
 
aeajr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 8,546
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Lyle,

You raise an extremely good point about the CG. While this is important for kits and ARFs, those pilots tend to be very aware of the importance of CG.

It is the PnP, BnF and RTF pilots that tend to trip over this issue. The model they purchased comes pre-balanced based on a specific battery, specific components and they have to be in the right spots.

Well the guy pulls out the 1300 mah pack and puts in a 3300 mah pack and proceeds to destroy the aircraft because it is so nose heavy or tail heavy he can't control it. Naturally the reaction is that his plane is a piece of crap and doesn't fly right, having no idea that he was the cause of the crash.

I have seen similar things happen when they pull out the light battery, that sits over the CG, and put in the heavy battery that doesn't really fit and throws off the CG. Or it loads the plane, making it so heavy that it flies like crap.

Balance and weight are not always obvious as issues to these PnP, BnF and RTF pilots.

Real good point!

Last edited by aeajr; 07-01-2014 at 02:37 PM.
aeajr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2014, 02:43 PM
  #21
laknox
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 27
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aeajr View Post
Lyle,

You raise an extremely good point about the CG. While this is important for kits and ARFs, those pilots tend to be very aware of the importance of CG.

It is the PnP, BnF and RTF pilots that tend to trip over this issue. The model they purchased comes pre-balanced based on a specific battery, specific components and they have to be in the right spots.

Well the guy pulls out the 1300 mah pack and puts in a 3300 mah pack and proceeds to destroy the aircraft because it is so nose heavy or tail heavy he can't control it. Naturally the reaction is that his plane is a piece of crap and doesn't fly right, having no idea that he was the cause of the crash.

I have seen similar things happen when they pull out the light battery, that sits over the CG, and put in the heavy battery that doesn't really fit and throws off the CG. Or it loads the plane, making it so heavy that it flies like crap.

Balance and weight are not always obvious as issues to these PnP, BnF and RTF pilots.

Real good point!
Not checking the CG on my only other attempt, destroyed the plane I built > 20 years ago, a balsa/Kote 2m plane. Got all hot-to-trot to go fly ran through the checklist, but forgot that one thing. Flying over an old alfalfa field that was partially plowed and, of course, ended up flying over the plowed portion since I couldn't get it turned to stay over the flat. Nice big dirt clod reached up and crushed the nose. I just said f'it, ripped the electrics out and sold 'em all a couple years later. As soon as I let it go, I knew exactly what I forgot, too.

Lyle
laknox is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2014, 12:52 PM
  #22
aeajr
Thread Starter
 
aeajr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 8,546
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

HOW ABOUT SUCCESSFULY FINDING YOUR PLANE?

I was recently reminded of the frustration a new pilot feels when he has put his plane in the woods and can't find it. He has been looking for several weeks. I have spend some hours out there with him with no luck.

For as little as $5 you can put a locator in your plane that will help you find it if you put it down in the trees, brush, tall grass, corn field, .... wherever you can't find it.

There are more capable and more expensive options as well.

This article is written for glider pilots but it applies to power planes just as well.

Plane Locators
http://www.flyesl.org/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=237
aeajr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2017, 08:58 AM
  #23
aeajr
Thread Starter
 
aeajr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 8,546
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

With many RTFs now coming with some kind of flight stabilization make sure you understand what this is doing. It might be marked as beginner mode.

What happens differently when you turn it off? Can you turn it off?

Will you be limited to only flying planes that are stabilized or can you fly without it? I would suggest that being able to fly without it is part of your keys to success as a new pilot.
aeajr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:02 PM.