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Going Electric !!!!!

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Old 10-09-2005, 08:25 PM
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snappinjim
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Default Going Electric !!!!!

Hi all. I have been flying glow planes for the past three years. I have been thinking very hard about giving up all my glow stuff for electric. I really like the no slime fact and the performance appears to have gotten better in the last few years. I need to know if there are any sites that have great training on getting started. Motor, battery controller information. etc. I do Enjoy building. I have looked at the SR Battries line of kits. Thank you for your help.
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Old 10-10-2005, 07:12 AM
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Default RE: Going Electric !!!!!

This site has great information of products and suppliers. Browse the reviews and I also recommend www.wattflyer.com
I'm on both of them a lot!
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Old 10-11-2005, 08:19 PM
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Mazin
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Default RE: Going Electric !!!!!

Well I too am very new to electric and glow but have been around the hobby since childhood. I was woundering what you have in the way of glow Equip, Planes, etc that you might wanna sell. I'am not wealthy but can most likely give you what you want. If you are interested I would love to hear back from you. Also in the way of electric planes I like www.towerhobbys.com the have a good selection plus hace tech notes on all there products. Watch the prices though, I have found more cost effective deals. Also if you use www.google.com as a search engine for info you want. If i get any better info I'll post it.
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Old 10-12-2005, 07:24 AM
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Default RE: Going Electric !!!!!

ORIGINAL: snappinjim

Hi all. I have been flying glow planes for the past three years. I have been thinking very hard about giving up all my glow stuff for electric. I really like the no slime fact and the performance appears to have gotten better in the last few years. I need to know if there are any sites that have great training on getting started. Motor, battery controller information. etc. I do Enjoy building. I have looked at the SR Battries line of kits. Thank you for your help.
Welcome to electric! Sorry to hear you are going to dump glow. Why not fly both?

Flying electric is not much different than flying glow. Just the power system changes so you have to learn about motors, speed controls and batteries. Power is measured in watts rather than horsepower or displacement. Watts - Volts X running amps

So if your motor draws 8 amps at 8.4 V your motor is drinking about 67 watts. That would be a good typical figure for a Speed 370 or speed 400 motor set up in a 16 ounce plane. Flies well, basic aerobatics, good climb rate. But not burning holes in the sky or flying 3D

If you are running this using a brushed motor, like a speed 400, about 40-50% of that power makes it to the prop.
If you are running a brushless motor then typically 70-90% of that power makes it to the prop, so input watts is only half the story. That is why brushless motors are all the rage. They cost a lot more than brushed motors, however prices are getting closer together.
If you get into planes over 2 pounds and you want some performance, brushless is the way to go!

Some old standby guidelines, based on brushed motors, that might be a good starting point.

For casual or easy sport flying, scale like flying, about 35-50 input watts per pound is a good benchmark. Many slow flyers do fine on 30 watts per pound.

For aerobatics, about 75 watts per pound seems to be a good starting point.

For 3D, about 100 watts per pound seems to be the benchmark I have seen used most often.

These are rough rules but they are a starting point.

So if you are building a 2 pound plane and want it to perform some good aerobatics, then a brushless motor that draws about 150 watts would be a good starting point. Assuming 8 cells ( 9.6V) you will need to be feeding that motor at WOT about 15-16 amps.

That helps you pick your motor, your speed controller and your battery pack.

Motor needs to consume 150 watts or more
ESC must handle at least 16 amps ( 20 to be safe)
Battery pack needs to be able to deliver 16 amps ( again figure 20) at 9.6V
Prop will be selected for that motor based on what watts ( voltsXamps) you are looking for and what that motor/battery set-up can deliver.

Even in the glow world, .40s are not all equal so it is in the electric world. The difference is glow is based on 50 year old technology that isn't changing much. Electric is evolving very fast with new motors, speed controls and battery technology hitting the market every year. And it only gets better and cheaper! Good stuff!

Some resources you might find helpful.

New Electric Flyer FAQs
http://www.ezonemag.com/pages/faq/a105.shtml

Electric Motor information
Click on Motor Chart link on this page too
http://parkflyermotors.com/secure/sh...m.asp?recid=11


If you are interested in small electrics in the 8-24 ounce range (parkflyers size) I can highly recommend any of the planes from www.mountainmodels.com and their support is outstanding! They sell the right servos and stuff for the planes too. Ask for their help. They won't steer you wrong.

Also the planes from Multiplex are excellent. Crafted in a resilient foam, called Elapor, they fly great and are very durable. I have flown their Easy Star and the Easy Glider and several people in our club have their Magister.
http://www.multiplexusa.com/models/P...PFmodel_fs.htm


If you like flying wings, Zagi is the big brand name in this slot
www.trickrc.com





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Old 10-16-2005, 09:50 PM
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Default RE: Going Electric !!!!!

I like www.mountainmodels.com for a good selection of great flying kits. Take all of Dougs suggestions and they fly great.

Larry
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Old 11-13-2005, 03:00 AM
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Default RE: Going Electric !!!!!

I would like an electric, as a second plane... I have a Great Planes PT-40 (a glow) and I'd like to try an electric before I get in too deep with glow. here's my dillema (hehe)... I'd really like a ducted fan type, but I can't seem to find any that would be good for a second plane... They are all either for intermediate/advanced flyers, or too small for my preference, or glow-type ducted fans. or turbines. I'd like something that is in the range of the equivalant to a glow 25 to 40-size. kit, ARF, RTF, doesnt matter. I appreciate everyone's help for me with this. My main problem is that nearly all ducted fan planes seem to be F-18's or F-16 or other fighter jets, which are usually 1) performance planes in the real world and 2) kept performance for the model plane flyers, so few of them are beginner! So thankyou everyone for helping me out.

Oh, and I also have a thing for multi's, that'd be great.
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Old 01-16-2006, 03:24 PM
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I Just bought a Parkzone super decatlhon and i am a first time flyer. It seems that everytime i take it for a fly it just simply keeps going up and stalls then come down and does it again, i havnt flown it longer than 20 seconds without crashing it. I hate to see it go to pieces when i just dropped alot of money on it. I would appreciate if someone could give me a few pointers on just keeping the damn thing up in the air, learn the basics i guess... well anyways also is there a really good beginer plane that can take alot of abuse and is fun and easy to flt. I would really like some feedback on this issue. thanks alot
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Old 01-16-2006, 07:33 PM
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Default RE: Going Electric !!!!!


ORIGINAL: newbie420

I Just bought a Parkzone super decatlhon and i am a first time flyer. It seems that everytime i take it for a fly it just simply keeps going up and stalls then come down and does it again, i havnt flown it longer than 20 seconds without crashing it. I hate to see it go to pieces when i just dropped alot of money on it. I would appreciate if someone could give me a few pointers on just keeping the damn thing up in the air, learn the basics i guess... well anyways also is there a really good beginer plane that can take alot of abuse and is fun and easy to flt. I would really like some feedback on this issue. thanks alot
What you describe is porpoising. Check your manual, If you hand is off the stick when this happens, you may need to make and adjustmet. If you are pulling back on the stick, then you are causing it. This may be helpful.

THE PROPER USE OF THE ELEVATOR
by Ed Anderson
aeajr on the forums

In flight, the wing does all the work.

The elevator adjusts the attitude of the wing relative to the approaching air.
This changes the amount of lift AND drag produced by the wing. If you apply
up elevator, it raises the front of the wing, increasing lift and drag. If
you have enough speed/power to overcome the drag, the plane will climb. If
you don't, it will slow down, lose lift and "stall". Typically, in a stall,
the plane will pitch up, slow then the nose will drop. This type of stall is almost always caused by the pilot.

Normally, the elevator is used often in flight, to make minor attitude, not altitude, changes. In the right combination with the throttle, you can gain or lose altitude smoothly with the elevator. If you "pull" too hard at too low a speed/power setting, you stall.

When I train new pilots, I often put them into low power settings/or pure
glides with the motor off. Now you really learn what the elevator does.

One of the interesting things is to understand that the wind can cause a
stall. You are flying along and the wind gusts and hits the front of the
plane. The sudden increase in air speed over the wing ( ground speed might
actually go down) causes an increase in lift causing the plane to pitch up.
As that happens, the wind catches under the wing and puts the nose up at too
steep of an angle, causes the plane to lose air speed, causing the stall.

You have to learn to "push" the nose down, back to a more level angle of
attack or the wing will stall. Do this and those gusts will actually help you
climb, IF you keep the wing close to level.

With practice, you start to develop the automatic response that a pitched up
nose needs to be corrected and push it to level to maintain good controllable
flight. I tell them to give it some down for a moment to correct the wing's
attitude. I am not telling them to dive the plane, but to bring the nose, and
the wing "down" to level flight.

The proper use of the elevator is all about keeping the plane at the proper
attitude for the type of flying you are doing and the current power setting.
Learning how to push to level is very important. And, if you stall, DON'T
pull back to try and hold the nose up. Push it to a slight dive to gain
speed so the wing can start flying again.

Don't be afraid to use the elevator. Just understand that you are using
the elevator to control the angle of the wing. The wing does all the work on
the plane but it has to have enough speed to do it. You are there to help.

That was a bit long, but I hope it made sense.

Here are some other tips you might find helpful: Six Keys to Success
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showt...08#post3551513
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Old 01-19-2006, 10:51 PM
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Default RE: Going Electric !!!!!

thank you so much, i tried what you told me and now i am starting to acually enjoy flying. and not stressing about crashing. I was also wondering if i should find a trainer or teach myself? what would you suggest?
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Old 01-19-2006, 11:04 PM
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Well it seems that its too late to try and fly it, i already have completely broken the nose cone off but fixed the whole propeler prop and motor, i was thinking about putting it in the box untill i got used to a more subceptable easy to fly and learn plane. I was looking into the HobbyZone Firebird Freedom Electric RTF with the anti crash technology. Also i was looking into a 4 channel duct fan airplane( most likely the GWS a-10) it seems it is a slow flyer....but is it easy to control? Should it get used to a 3 channel first? Pardon my questions but I would also like to ask your opinion about getting a "realflight" flight simulator? Thanks!
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Old 01-20-2006, 03:30 PM
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Leo L
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Default RE: Going Electric !!!!!

Someone once wrote that the better looking the plane, the more difficult it is to fly. There is more than a little truth in this statement. The 4-channel duct plane is definitely not a plane to start with. Start with any of the following: Firebird Commander; Firebird Freedom; Aerobird Challenger; T-hawk; Easy Star; Slow-V; Slow-Stick; BeginAir. The easier the controls, and the more stable the plane, the greater are your chances for successful beginner flights.

Don't be discouraged by the failed attempts to fly the Decathlon. I love the way the plane looks, but it is much harder to fly than any of the planes listed above. Its even a more difficult plane to fly than its sister plane, the Cub.

For a quick boost to your flying, get an AeroAce for $30 at Toys-R-Us. Its a blast to fly, very easy to learn and is virtually indestructable.
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Old 01-21-2006, 04:51 AM
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Default RE: Going Electric !!!!!

If you want to try electrics, GWS has a pretty good range of different planes and the prices are reasonable. They may not be the prettiest straight out of the box but, as far as I can tell, they actually fly well. I have two: E-Starter trainer and Formosa aerobat (with a brushless motor for more power).
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Old 05-27-2006, 04:33 PM
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Hey, newbie, go to page one of electric training and scroll down to the line with the link to the "free flight simulator". You can set it up easily with an inexpensive two stick joystic and make it work like any transmitter to fly. I paid arount $12.00 for mine at Best buy, and it plugs into the usb on any computer. I advise using windows xp, but I'm sure it will work fine with which ever recommended version you download. It works very well, and the best part is it is another of those much needed savings in the somewhat spendy hobby of r/c flying. Good luck and good flying.
By the way, the decathalon has shorter wings and you may want to slap on the j3 wing for your first flights to enable better lift. The wing is about the only difference in the parkzone j3 and decathalon, anyway. If it is a bit slow, then search the threads here to find the pitch of prop that is recommended for better speed, but may use more juice from battery. You may also want to get the higher MiAh battery to use with same 8.4 volt ESC for longer flight. Watch for hot batteries near end of flight, too much heat and plastic don't mix well. Make sure you tape on a ribbon to battery pack for easy removal after flight, I pulled on wires to remove mine and later testing the motor, the battery wires caused too much heat from shorting in tha battery pack and melted wires all the way to the ESC and overheated it - fried. Just a note, if you decide to go to the nickel poly packs search the web for the explosion videos of these if not treated properly. I hope this only encourages you to keep going with electric, it's food for the flight-hungry, and more convenient than builing for a week, then flying. Have fun flying.
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