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Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

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Old 10-28-2005, 01:31 PM
  #1  
OldArmy94
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Default Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

It seems to me that we make things too difficult for new hobbyists. We "insist" that they find a local RC club and find an instructor. We thumb our noses at 2 channel planes and mock anything that doesn't cost $$$$ or involve a serious outlay of time/money. Personally, I think that we forget that it is supposed to be FUN. Instead, we just create a lot of stress by "do's" and "don'ts" rather than remembering that this hobby is a LOT easier and cheaper to get into nowadays than 20 years ago. I believe some of it must stem from jealousy on the part of the oldtimers who think that RC flying is a "pay your dues" kind of thing--nonsense, it's about having a good time and whatever that involves, then do it! Now, I don't suggest buying a $500 ducted fan jet and go attempt to fly it without some type of guidance. I DO think it's OK to spend $29.99 at Harbor Freight on a Yellow Bee and go play with it at your local ballpark. Hey, you might wreck it!!! Is that the end of the world? No, and you'll probably learn a little about how to fly. You'll also probably enjoy the experience. Anyway, that's just my 2 cents about what I perceive as snobbery from some of the more seasoned hands around here.

Does anyone else think this way?
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Old 10-28-2005, 03:16 PM
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Jim_McIntyre
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

I think it's less snobbery than it is an attempt to assure a good first experience....[8D]
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Old 10-28-2005, 03:24 PM
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chili300
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Being the adventurous type, I thumbed my nose at conventional wisdom. Bought a 2 channel Hobbyzone Firebird and taught myself to fly by doing everything wrong. Mistakes are the best teacher there is! After 4 months, 86 flights and uncountable repairs, I jumped into a GWS E-Starter (4 channel). My confidence and skills continue to grow, and the fun never ends. Just keep the epoxy handy!

Chili300

P.S. The old Firebird flys better than new and many parts are modifed or homemade!
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Old 10-31-2005, 01:51 PM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

I appreciate someone bringing this up. I have wanted to fly R/C planes since I was a kid, and now at 28 I finally got my first planes. I think it sucks when you get a lot of snobbery or ego or whatever you want to call it. especially as an adult. I have gotten my fair share of it from my local hobby shop. The guy who runs it has a tendency to be "holier than thou" and anything he doesnt like is just crap.

But I also think its like anything else in life; "Take it for what is worth." If you agree fine, if not fine. I got lots of advice, and my first plane was an Airhog from Toys-R-Us for $50. I crashed it over and over but also has some really great flights. I learned a ton about throttle control with that thing. Then I just bought a Art-Tech Cessna 182 for $95.

Take everything with a grain of salt.
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Old 10-31-2005, 06:31 PM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

I agree with OldArmy,

About 10 months ago I purchased a Vortex 2-channel plane on E-bay for $68. Complete with everything needed. I did not have anybody helping me.

I did not crash it the first time, but crashes came after that. Many of them. Mostly from being too windy for the beast (wings on a stick) or over controlling it. When I was able to fly it without crashing it, I then went to better planes:

Parkzone J-3 Cub -- 3 channel and crashed many times learning how to handle at the right speeds and how to land. Went to the next one when I could fly it without any problems.

Parkflyers Cessna 182 -- 4 channel and crashed several times learning how to control a plane that was faster, more fragile and aileron controls that reacted quickly to any input. After I learned to control it properly, I went to the next one.

Parkzone Stryker -- 3 channel with aileron controls. Lots of speed and very durable (lucky for me because of the crashes). I can now fly it very comfortably and looking for more powerful motors and higher speeds!

Parkflyers Edge 540T -- 4 channel aeorobatic plane. Also crashed a couple of times being too gutsy with a non-forgiving plane. Had to learn how to do the various maneuvers without the benefit of Hi/Lo rates. That was difficult.

Finally, a Parkzone Typhoon 3D -- Have not crashed this one -- I've learned a lot about what to do right when I'm learning with a new plane.

All of my maiden flights were at a park all by myself. I fly all of these planes almost every week (except the Vortex). I enjoy every single one of them because they behave differently. The J-3 Cub is always my last one -- very relaxing and fits like an old shoe!

Yes, I've spent a lot more time and money had I had an instructor by my side. But then, I would not have been able to fly every time I felt like it nor would I have learned so much about each of the planes, especially how to repair them! Also, I would have had a lot less fun learning. I would do the same thing again if I had to do it over.

By the way, I'm 64 years old, so I don't have a lot of time to learn as most of you young pilots do. But I do have the free time.... and money so far has not been a problem for this sort of thing.

Good luck flying and have fun doint it!
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Old 11-01-2005, 12:43 PM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

I'd agree with thr whole snobby attitude bit.

As a kid I wanted nothing more than to learn to fly R/c planes. I bugged and bugged my parents, we went several times to the local AMA sancntioned field to watch the slimers, and were always turned a cold shoulder to. I was even lucky enough my parents bought my a .40 size trainer, R/C gear, field gear ect... I put the plane together, balanced it, broke the engine in and never flew it- no doubt in part due to not wanting to go ask some unfriendly, arrogant person for help. in the meantime I enjoyed many an R/c car kit, and boat kit (mostly electric) and some very high performance ones at that- i always wondered and longed for the day this technology and easy of use might creep over to R/c planes.


Fast forward 15 years- It happened!! I got brave one day and while cruising around the hobby store- impluse bought a PZ J-3 cub- little did I know at the time it would turn out to be the ticket to my longtime dream of flying. I managed to teach myself to fly the little cubbie, with no assistance- it now has over 100 flights on it, and i've continued on with several other faster more advnaced 4ch models. to this day I prefer to fly by myself or with one or two other 'friends'. We actually have a church that allows people to fly electrics on their property in town, and on some saturday mornings there will be 20-25 people there flying. Even though this place is touted as beginner friendly you still get "that look" for bringing a RTF model- "I've never seen one of those fly well", "Why don't you get some standard radio gear", "27 Mhz is for toys", blah blah blah...

I think some of these folks need to realize the reason the hobby continues to survive and evolve as it does is in large part because of these electrics and RTF models. R/C aviation had grown to a stagnet point, as skiing had about 15 years ago before the invention of the snowboard, and new life and interest was given to the sport. in much the way these lil electrics and RTF planes have to R/c aviation. without new blood and new dollars in the hobby, it becomes stagnet and people loose interest. something that is all to forgotten about at the "AMA sanctioned" fields.
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Old 11-01-2005, 01:34 PM
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Leo L
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

I partially agree with OldArmy and jmir; there are many experienced flyers who push the novice into expensive equipment and complex planes right away. That's fine if you are going to learn with a teacher, but most new flyers, from what I've seen on the various forums, start out on their own. In that case, the best plane is one that is simple, inexpensive, durable and slow. When you first start to fly, it seems like everything is happening at lightning speed and you must think, and control, in three dimmensions, unlike cars or boats that require only two dimmensional control. The best thing that a beginner can do is spend time flying, flying, and flying; not building, re-building and fixing.

I started flying eight months ago, at the age of 50. The first plane that I bought was the ArtTech Cessna 4-channel. When the plane arrived in the mail, I realized that it was way too much plane for a beginner, so I set it aside until I was more experienced. (Have not flown it yet)

My second plane was the HobbyZone Firebird Commander. A great plane for a beginner, I flew it most mornings before going to work. During the first couple of weeks, about half of my time was spent recovering the plane from various trees. I never had any help learning how to fly this plane and I learned three very important lessons. Never try to beat the wind. If its too windy, come back the next day and try again. Altitude is your friend; the ground, and especially trees, are your enemy. Stay away from them. Always check your equipment before flying. If there are any problems with the plane or the controls, fix them before flying.

My third plane was a ParkZone J3Cub. On the maiden flight, a local experienced flyer tried to help adjust the trim, reaching over my shoulder as I was trying to fly the new plane. By the time that he got finished fiddling with the controls, the plane was nearly 1/2 mile away. I couldn't figure out if it was coming or going and it eventually crashed behind a grove of trees. We spent several hours looking for it but never found it.

My fourth plane was the 2 channel Dragon 207. (I figured that it would serve as a good back-up for the Firebird.) I won it on e-bay for $1, but didn't realize that shipping was an additional $45. A complete waste of money, the plane would not fly more than a few yards. I tried a better prop and a different battery, but to no avail.

My fifth plane was the Wind Spirit. It was advertised on e-bay as a new 3-channel version, but when I received it, I found that it was only a 2 channel model. I received a partial refund from the seller, resulting in a final cost of $40, including shipping. The plane is basically a giant version of the Firebird, with a 60" wingspan and weighing approximately 3 lbs. It takes at least 60 ft. of runway to get this bird airborne, but then it flies very nicely. I've had it well over 1,000 ft. up, flying it for 20 minutes with the power off.

My sixth plane was the Megatech Airstrike. The first two flights resulted in nose first crashes after only a few seconds of flight. Realizing that the pilot was not good enough for this plane yet, I set it aside. That was mid summer. I tried flying the plane two days ago and had three successful flights, but I get less than seven minutes of flight (I tried two different batteries), so the plane gets stored until I figure out a better battery to use with it.

My seventh plane was the Aerobird Challenger. A great plane, easy to switch to from the Firebird, relaxing to fly as a more experienced flyer. I fly this plane nearly every morning.

My eight plane was the ParkZone J3Cub (again). This time I bought a used one on e-bay. Great plane, I also fly it nearly every morning, but still in the beginners mode. Next week I'll try the advanced mode.

My ninth plane is the ParkZone Decathlon. I also bought this one used on e-bay, but have not flown it yet.

I figure that I'll stick with the Aerobird and Cub this fall and winter, and in the spring try the Decathlon and Cessna. The local guys keep telling me that I'm good enough to buy an ARF with better electronics, maybe get into 3-D, but I'm happy flying slow and easy. Usually I'm the only person flying, except on Saturday mornings when as many as 20 flyers show up. I've learned that most of them started with the Firebird Commander.

My wife and my son (24 yrs old) both expressed interest in trying to fly, but did not want to start with a "big" plane. From several threads I found out about the AirHogs Aeroace. What a terrific micro-flyer! Absolutely the best plane for a beginner to learn the basic controls and feel of 2 channel flight. Available at Toys-r-us for $30, I bought two of them and they are a blast to fly, in the daytime at the park or at night time under the street lights.
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Old 11-01-2005, 06:31 PM
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jmir
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Leo L,

Looks like you have been having lots of fun flying and learning!

Wait till you get that Cessna 182 up in the air. It is really awsome the way it looks flying. I'm on my second fuselage (sorry to say), but I don't crash it any more.

Good luck!
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Old 11-03-2005, 11:35 PM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

I don't think it's snobbery at all.

It's just that this hobby, like all other hobbies, attracts different kinds of people. Excuse me, but some guys bring some real junk to the airport, that's all that they can afford, so, what the heck. Others, with money from sponsors, or money from the working wife, bring some really nice custom painted stuff. If you look closely, some of those guys with the custom painted stuff arrive with custom trailers, pull out custom tables, custom tools, custom chairs, the old faithful custom cooler and last but not least the custom uniform. If you hang around long enough, most of those custom people never fly and they almost never have really have good looking custom woman with them. They just come to the field and give the impression that they are snobby. Not so. Most of those guys just light up when somone comes over and talks to them. Now, if one of those guys had a real good looking woman with him, we might expect some sort of snobbery, because, getting a good looking woman to the RC field is quite an accomplishment. Those guys, deserve respect and attention. However, that sight is far and few between. There is no way that I would think that a guy with a trailer full of RC airplanes was snobby. What is there to be snobby about? Like I said, most can't even fly, they don't even test their own planes. They are shaking in thier boots when it comes to flying. It's the guys with the junkers that fly all the time, they hog the field. They're not snobby, a little wierd looking, but not snobby. Heck, I'd ask one of those guys to help before I 'd ask Mr. Custom trailer. Not because Mr. Custom trailer is snobby and standoffish, but because Mr. Junker is probably a much better pilot.

I really admire some of the craftsmanship and originality that people put into their stuff. I'm somewhat in the middle, not the best with arts and crafts, can't fly RC nearly as I good as I can fly full size, but, when I crash everyone looks. I like lots of smoke and damage, no nose overs for me. The object is to have fun, isn't it? Snobbery? Nah. People that don't fly RC think that we are all wierd, grown guys playing with toys, wasting time glueing, soldering, painting, all in solitude, acting like like a recluse. So, snobby is not the right word to describe us hobbiests.

We're just a bunch of wierd guys that like to spend time building stuff, breathing fresh air, relaxing without wine and woman, and we also like to check out the other wierd guys that show up at the field. To the outside world we might be geeks, but, to other hobbiests it't quite an honor to be referred to as a snob. But, for the most part, you can't tell a book from it's cover, try talking to the guy close to you at the field, most of the those geeky looking snobby guys are really nice. Talk to them, make thier day.
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Old 11-04-2005, 04:53 AM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Make no mistake about it, this hobby costs lots and lots of $'s.

I have found if you want a good flying plane with lots of power, you gota be ready to pay for it.
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Old 11-06-2005, 12:07 PM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

algutkin - you make some really valid points. I'm new to R/C flying and haven't had flying field or club experience, but almost every point you made rings true in my other hobby (model railroading). You have your "snobs", "junkers", "wannabe snobs", "look like snobs but are not" and of course, "really decent common folk" type guys. For the most part, the snobs are the ones who out-spend everyone else and pretend to be experts even thou they never really build anything. They just throw tons of money into buying things and then spend their time bragging about all their goodies adn lloking down their nose at your junk. The guys who actually build and run the stuff are the guys that are most friendly and helpful to others.

I think this is typical in almost any hobby. Some people just need to get attention by having the biggest and best or acting like an expert. They don't realize that others would enjoy their company more if they didn't act that way.

Customcougar ( junker flyer and proud of it )
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Old 11-09-2005, 11:49 AM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

I have to agree that many RCers are stuck up and arrogant. I, at times, can be that way, even though I don't belong to any club, and fly my cheap plane at a local school whenever I have time. But, even though many of us are stuck up and it is very intimidating going into hobby shops and to local flying clubs, I still think that every new RCer should go to these places at least once. Mainly RC clubs. I will usually take a 25 minute trip out to my local club when they have events going on and just watch them. By just seeing the planes fly, it gives me a better sense on how I need to do things in order to keep my plane in one piece. It also gets me excited and in the mood to go out and fly. So, even though you might not like talking to most RCers, it doesn't mean that you cannot go enjoy the hobby that you love.

Oh, and just to get this off my chest, I will never buy an expensive plane. The cheaper ones are the way to go. Modifying them is more fun anyways.
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Old 11-09-2005, 02:58 PM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Ol' Army and others have it right, especially about LHS owners. Everything online is"expletive deleted" and everything except what they sell is "exp.deleted." And if you are new they automatically think you're not only ignorant, but stupid, too. They want you to buy the $400 trainer, learn on it and move up! I don't blame them for wanting to sell stuff at all - but it seems to me the best way to go about it is to listen to the customer. I'm 62, retired, have a BA and MA, and don't appreciate being talked down to. And I DO know what I want. Which is electric. But they all want me to do it their way, and fly fuel. I explain my reasons for not doing that and they act like they didn't even hear me. Oh, and I must have an instructor. (How did the first rc guy ever learn?) And to that end, "Why no instructor will want to reach over & grab your tx, so ya gotta have this model tx, with the buddy switch on it..." And on and on. I, too, like so many here, bought an Art-Tech Cessna 182, 4-channel. When it got here, I soon realized that despite the ads it isn't a trainer for a novice. So I bought a Wing Dragon, rebuilt it, and am waiting for a calm day. BTW, I had my CP license a few years ago, so I'm not as dumb as I may look That's my 2 cents worth. Ahhhh, feels better now. Bil
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Old 11-09-2005, 05:36 PM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Hi bil2;
Had to laugh whrn you mentioned about using a buddy box. I don't use one. Was teaching this guy that was built like a wrestler and I'm just a little shrimp. Plane is heading for the turf in a spiral dive, yanked the transmitter out of his hand to save it. Wasn't sure whether to run like H or what, anyway he was glad I saved his plane. Went through the glow thing since the early 60s. As said, there were no instructors. Radios were not that reliable back then so didn't whether it was me or the radio that caused the prang. Electrics put the spice back into flying again. 69 yrs old and feel like i'm starting all over.
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Old 11-13-2005, 03:37 AM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Im new to the whole RC thing. And I have to say, Bil2 has soem good points. The salesmen really pushed the more expensive plane... a Great Planes PT-40 (kit, glow). Sure, it only costs 130$!!! but then I ended up spending another 5-600$ on other stuff (radio and engine being the bulk of it) If i had gone the cheap way (the way they werent pushing) then I could've been flying a 3-ch electric plane for about 90$, i think it was. sure, the PT-40 is 4ch but the 3-ch is a helluva lot cheaper to fix and maintain and its no big loss if i destroy it! probably easier to fly too! I would like to state that i unfortunately found RCU after i bought the plane, so now i realize the woes of my ways (heheh). It's sad to say, but RC is definitely one of these things where you really should not go on the advice of the person who sells the stuff.

Hatty brings up a good point, too. I feel very intimidated when i go into the LHS. I didnt actually buy the plane at this LHS, but I pretty much bought everything else there. The guy knows me by now, but I still feel very... stupid whenever i go in there. Like i know absolutely nothing about RC and he's just lookin down his long old wrinkled nose at some punk tryin to do what only adults find entertainment in. I'll go in there to buy something i know i can get cheap but useful, and i'll come out with the same thing only more expensive and "professional" with a famous name on it or whatever, and i know i could have got the same for cheaper. Know what i mean? the guy's hard to deal with!! and it's really unfortunate that the next closest hobby shop is about 40 mins away, not including rush hour traffic. (and i'm not exaggerating)

I've turned this post into something to let my rage out on... heheheh. The good thing is that now i know what i'm doing, atleast, more than I did before. So im planning on getting a small cheap electric next, from a larger hobbyshop that i can deal with different people instead of one snobby old man, hopefully a ducted fan multi cus those things are neat. and this time, i'm setting a limit on the $$ i spend!!!
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Old 11-13-2005, 03:19 PM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Got one word for ya' Farmer Boy...Ebay! Check it out for electrics, ("electric airplanes"); they got a buncha RTFs, all for under $150. Also check out RCUniverse classifieds, & RCGroup classifieds, & Ezone & Wattflyer. Also, Hobby People catalog has some exceptional deals on ARFs, not sure about their website. There must be more, but I can't think of them right now. I never bought anything online, excepting a couple golf clubs, but in the r/c world, it seems that virtually everything online is cheaper than at the local hobby shop, and if these guys are snots, well...just blow 'em away! Don't be afraid to email 'em and ask about lowering their S & H prices, too. Some will, some won't, but asking's free. One guy's selling me a Spitfire RTF for $99 delivered, after advertising it for $59 + $55 S & H. I've seen the same one for as high as $159. I went to buy a battery charger yesterday when it turned out the LHS had it for the same price - buncha kids, acted like I was imposing on their time shootin' the crap with their buddies. Don't need it, and with the price of gas, shipping fees are cheaper, since I live out of a major city by 30 - 40 miles or so. Good luck. Bil
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Old 11-14-2005, 10:45 PM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Ahh..this saga continues. I went to my LHS the other day. I bought an Art-Tech Cessna online via Ebay a few weeks back after doing a lot of research on RCU (kind of a mistake since its difficult to fly for a rookie). I had read about swithing to Li-Poly batteries for extended flight time. I asked my LHS guy (after forcing him to get up from his little "lounge area" where he was BS'ing with his buddies) about the batteries. He asked what I had, so I told him. He basically looked at me like I was an idiot, told me that the plane was crap equipment, and there was no way a Li-Poly would work. Never asked to maybe see the plane, speed controller, motor or anything to see if there was something that may work. Granted I am new to the hobby and respect the fact that I have a lot to learn, but at the same time I dont appreciate some *****-hat treating me like I am a moron. But, being the only LHS in my area and the occasional need for parts quickly, I take the high road, be the bigger man and deny my urge to choke-slam him everytime I go in.

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Old 11-15-2005, 07:17 AM
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jmir
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Go to www.parkflyers.com for parts for the Cessna 182.
The 7.4V 2S lipo battery for the Cessna goes for about $35 or so.

By the way, the Cessna 182 is a great plane. Just make sure you protect it for inevitable crashes to come. The main thing is to cover major portions of the wing with clear plastic tape and also the fuselage. It will then withstand light crashes and rough landings much better.

Later on, when you have learned to control it and want a brand new body (to replace the one you will probably rough up a bit), then go to www.awlhobbies.com. They sell the complete plane, without the electronics, for about $65. Not a bad deal.

Jmir

PS - I get the same treatment at my LHS, except for one of the salesmen. I just walk away if he is not around unless I need parts in a hurry!!

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Old 11-15-2005, 08:57 AM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

This morning was such an awesome day for flying today..it was blazing orange outside...a little frosty but ZERO wind...too bad I don't have my plane yet...
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Old 11-15-2005, 02:50 PM
  #20  
resqguy77
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Sure...rub it in...I have been waiting for over two weeks now for a calm day. We had gale force winds all weekend and now they are calling for it again tomorrow. Ugh![:@]
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Old 11-15-2005, 03:59 PM
  #21  
bil2
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Resqguy- Look on Ebay or go to xus.com. They sell a bunch of li-pos, 7.4, 1050 - 2000 mAh, w/charger for about $35 - 45 + s&h. And if you search Ebay for li-po batteries, you'll come up with a bunch. I'm telling ya' Ebay has become my LHS, without the Attitude and the comments about how anything I buy online is a piece of crap. One LHS owner told me everything online is worthless and he NEVER would even LOOK online: heh,heh, so, of course, the obvious question popped into my lil peabrain and my mouth asked it before I could stop..."So, how do you know everything online's crappy if you've never gone there...hmmm?" Red face, tied tongue, no answer, buddies chuckle, I leave, never to darken his doorstep again. Heck, with the price of gas, its just as cheap to pay the s&h (I live 25-30 miles outside a major city), and NO bullhockey, no-nothing opinions to put up with [:'(](at least most of the time!), Bil ps-Check out item # 6000336381 on Ebay - li-po 7.4V, 1300mAh, $23.95 Buy-It-Now price, $2.95 s&h, no charger.
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Old 11-15-2005, 10:29 PM
  #22  
resqguy77
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Thanks for the info. I dont know much about Li-Poly batteries (volts, mAh, cells etc???????.) But Parkflyers.com does sell one marketed for the Cessna. I am going to wait til I get a little better flying it before I invest more money. Only flown twice. Crashed both times. Easily repaired. I have made all the modifications such as taping the wings and fuse. I even reinforced the landing gear with balsa wood struts. Now if only I can get a calm day. I dont think thats too much to ask for. The weather has sucked for the last two weeks. Gale winds right now outside. Crazy.

Thank you for everyones help. I appreciate the patience for novices.
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Old 11-15-2005, 10:48 PM
  #23  
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

I remember the time when I didn't have a clue about this hobby (come to think of it, I still don't) . This is part of the reason why I love it so much though. There are many people out there who are more than willing to give an arm or a leg to help newbies out. But, every once and a while, you do find bad seeds. But, I can tell you right now, without this site, I would be nowere in this hobby. Thanks a lot to everyone on this site and to rcuniverse itself. I cannot wait for Thanksgiving break to roll around so I can go back home and fly again. I'm in college and my plane doesn't fit in my apartment []. But, at least I know about this place.
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Old 11-16-2005, 09:09 AM
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Leo L
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

Get the Aeroace microflyer for the times that you are in college. It will help during those lonely days when you wish you were flying at home.
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Old 11-16-2005, 11:50 AM
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Default RE: Do we make it too difficult for new RC hobbyists?

resqguy- (volts, mAh, cells?) I'm a newbie myself, but I've done some research, mainly here, and the other rc sites, businesses online, and asking questions of ebay dealers - great sources of info. Still don't know much about charging batts, but can tell you li-pos come in (usually) 2 (7.4V) or 3 (11.1V) cells. mAh is basically an indicator of TIME - the more mAh, the longer you can fly; depending on a bunch of variables, a 2000 mAh will fly a lot longer than a 740 mAh. Trade-off, (as always in electrics there's a trade-off) is weight & cost. The more mAh, the heavier & more expensive the battery. I may be wrong but so far as I can tell, one brand is pretty much the same as any other - sorta like alkaline batteries - according to Consumer Reports, the only variable with alkies is price. I would look for a connector that matches, or buy some and fab up yr own and an adaptor for yr charger. DO NOT CHARGE A LI-PO WITH A MIMH OR NICAD ONLY CHARGER. Bad for the health of yr car, house, lifestyle, and lots else! Bil
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