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Old 11-15-2005, 10:13 PM
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BBAGBY
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Default Need experienced advice


I have always been a fan of R/C planes. In my teens I built a lot of control line planes but never did fly one. I think I was more into the construction than the flying. Now that I am much older and time is not a problem, I would like to learn to fly, electric prefered, as well as build a larger kit. I have tried flying a couple of the hobbyzone planes, but the wind seems to really play havoc with them. So I have 2 main questions. I need recomendations on a RTF Electric trainer plane to learn to fly while I am building my plane.
My second question is I am very interested in the Dare Stinson Voyager #529EL Kit. I have had some building experience but it has been quite a few years ago. Can anyone give me input on this kit?
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Old 11-16-2005, 09:37 AM
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Leo L
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Default RE: Need experienced advice

I am going to assume that you have very little flying experience, that you do not use a simulator, and that you do not have an instructor readily available.

As a beginner, you will crash. The point is to limit the crashes and the damage done. As a beginner, your mind and body don't know how to respond properly to an emergency situation with your plane. therefore you should start with a slow flying plane, one that will give you planty of time to think about what you need to do in every situation. One type is the Slow Stick / Slow-V; another is the Aerobird Challenger / T-Hawk. All of these planes are very good, inexpensive planes to learn on, but they all require calm wind conditions (5 mph or less). Usually, the most calm conditions occur during the first two hours after sonrise and the last hour before sunset.

Sorry, but I cann't help with your second question. Good luck.
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Old 11-16-2005, 12:49 PM
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Default RE: Need experienced advice

Use the free fms simulator. If you want a large RTF try a Mutliplex Magister. Great article here:
http://www.plawner.net/3/1st_plane/
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Old 11-29-2005, 09:00 PM
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Default RE: Need experienced advice


ORIGINAL: BBAGBY


I have always been a fan of R/C planes. In my teens I built a lot of control line planes but never did fly one. I think I was more into the construction than the flying. Now that I am much older and time is not a problem, I would like to learn to fly, electric prefered, as well as build a larger kit. I have tried flying a couple of the hobbyzone planes, but the wind seems to really play havoc with them.
Which Hobbyzone planes did you try? The firebird series, prior to the Firebird Freedom, are mainly calm air planes so flying them in wind is not recommended.

The Hobbyzone Firebird Freedom, Aerobird Challenger and Aerobird Xtreme are three channel planes that handle wind much better. But a new flyer should still be learning in clam to 5 mph air.

Other good RTF starters are:

Multiplex Easy Star

T-Hawk


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