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parkzone cub question

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Old 01-03-2006, 06:51 PM
  #1  
zeroseven
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Default parkzone cub question

Is the motor mount supposed to be a little crooked like this? My cub has yet to be flown and came like this.


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Old 01-03-2006, 07:20 PM
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Bevo
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

Yes, It's to compensate for the torque of the motor. Th is will allow the motor to pull straight instead of off to one side.


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Old 01-05-2006, 12:43 PM
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Leo L
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

Bevo is correct. Now go and have some fun flying it.
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Old 01-05-2006, 06:27 PM
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zeroseven
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

Thanks guys.[8D] I might have a chance to take it up this weekend if i can get someone to come with i'll get a vid of its maiden flight.
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Old 01-05-2006, 08:16 PM
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

one more question guys. One side of my elevator has i bit of a concave to it. Should i replace this before i fly or do you think it is ok?

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Old 01-06-2006, 07:52 AM
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

It's a very slight bend, so I think it will be OK to fly the way it is. Any effect can be trimmed out easily with the trim controls.

For your maiden flight, don't forget:
Do a range test to make sure the TX/RX range is good - the manual covers this
It will be better if there is no wind at all, but certainly less than 5 mph if you just can't wait for a perfect day
If there is a local hobby shop around, change the propeller to a GWS8060. The Cub will not stall as easily.
Give it a strong forward/slightly-upward push towards the wind with full throttle - like throwing a dart
Keep the Cub flying straight by using the rudder control until it is about 50 feet high
Then, reduce throttle to about 1/2 and adjust trim controls until it flies straight and even almost by itself
From then on, just have fun!

There are lots of suggestions in these forums on how to protect the Cub from those "unintended landings"
Here are the most important ones:
Strengthen nose by using spray foam -- it will keep it from crunching up on a crash
Reinforce front pins holding wing by placing a piece of foam between pins and top of fuselage -- it will avoid fuselage rips
Cover inside of cowl with clear packing tape -- it will keep it from tearing when crashing

I learned to fly with the J-3 Cub over a year ago and still enjoy it very much. It's a great starter plane.








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Old 01-07-2006, 10:25 PM
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

I would for sure straighten out the elevator. It can be steamed out. The less calculated risks the better.
Try to get some help if this is your first flight.
Good luck and give us a flight report.

John Smith
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Old 01-07-2006, 11:19 PM
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Leo L
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

MAJOR CONCERN! Forget about the slight bend in the elevator. You have a much more crucial problem: your rudder is creased just behind the control horn. If you don't repair it, it will eventually bend at this crease. When that happens, you will loose all ability to steer in one direction. Same thing happened to my Cub and my Decathlon. Luckily I was flying fairly low and in the middle of a large open field when each plane stopped steering in one direction. I was able to circle the planes and land them without any damage, but if I was flying near the edge of the field, I might have lost or crashed the planes.

The repair is very simple. Get a piece of stiff plastic or wood, cut it so that it will span the crease yet will not interfere with the control horn, nor the elevator. Roughen both surfaces with sand paper and glue with epoxy. I used a piece of 3/8"x3/8" plastic angle that I had lying in the shop. If I have a chance, I'll post a photo.
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Old 01-08-2006, 10:09 AM
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

Leo L,

You are right! I missed that by just looking at the elevator.

I used the plastic from an old credit card, cut it to fit around the creased part and glued it on. Works great.

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Old 01-10-2006, 05:43 AM
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Leo L
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

Here is a photo of the repair
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Old 01-10-2006, 06:21 AM
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

Leo,
I just looked at your repair photo. Nice job.
I saw in the picture though your wire tie on the clevis.
If you break the original tubing that came on the clevis, just buy a piece of 1/8" fuel tubing. Cut it into 1/4" sections. Much stronger then the originals.
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Old 01-10-2006, 01:09 PM
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Leo L
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

Thanks Glacier Girl. I'm constantly amazed at the depth of knowledge that you have regarding all aspects of the Cub.

I recently bought a Venom motor for the Cub, but I'm thinking of using it in my Decathlon, because the Cub flies OK in stock form, but the Decathlon needs some help. I finally got through all 38 pages of the Cub threads and copied the best suggestions onto a Word file. The file is 18 sheets long, but now I can easily reference the aileron conversion, tail wheel, etc. Its interesting to note that more than half of the information comes from your threads. Again, thanks!

P.S.: What's the story behind the selection of your name "Glacier Girl"?
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Old 01-12-2006, 09:44 PM
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

Will the insulating foam add much weight? How much did you use?
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Old 01-30-2006, 08:32 PM
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

I had one of those planes, the biggest challenge here was getting proper wind conditions, I consider myself blessed with 10mph, just did a romp wiht the latest creation in 35 mph, it wasn't pretty, but wouldn't be as bad if the Radio wasn't interfered with by pagers, cell, or general outside annoyances, I had almost no control over it from day one
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Old 01-31-2006, 10:48 AM
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Default RE: parkzone cub question

Zeroseven, I got a Cub two weeks ago and taught myself to fly on it. It's very forgiving and easy, PROVIDED you fly in no wind. I got a FB Scout for Xmas, then bought a Hobbyzone Micro Ultrix for $30, with shipping. I have a private pilot's license, but zero RC experience. Understanding the fundamentals of flight, I believe, will make it MUCH easier to learn to fly RC. That said, I took the Scout out early Jan to fly in 15mph winds, having never flown an RC before....bad idea. It lasted 5 minutes before running away 1,500 feet downwind and augering in on one wing, cartwheeling along the ground, destroying the wings, literally SHATTERING the whole tail sections, and snapping the carbon fiber boom. When I reached the sight of the carnage, the little bits of foam that once made up the vtail were already blowing away in the wind, and about the only thing that survived was the rubber nose bumper.

It was fun while it lasted, but I didn’t really gain any RC piloting skills from that experience. Next, the Ultrix arrived in the mail and I took it out, and over two days of playing, actually got it so that I can consistently fly it without crashing, even in 10mph winds, (although it hardly moves when going upwind.) Finally, the Cub arrived two weeks ago, and my first flight was in wind around 8mph. I learned from the Ultrix that you should only use very quick “blips” of control when you’re learning, otherwise you’re very likely to stall or do a wingover. I also learned that you should get TONS of altitude before making any turns b/c even if you screw up and start a spin or stall, just let off all throttle, straighten the controls, and the plane will usually recover almost by itself, if you have a lot of altitude.

So my first flight, I let the cub go right on up to about 100’, reduced throttle to 1/2, then started my turns. I was surprised b/c I feel the Cub is easier to control than the 2 channel planes b/c you’re able to use down elevator to beat into the wind. With the 2 channel planes, you’re at the mercy of the wind and just have to keep porpoising to go upwind. I made several successful circuits and decided to bring her down. Unfortunately, when I got about 10’ off the ground and coming in at 1/3 throttle for a landing, a gust tipped one wing up, and she went straight into the ground. The plastic cowl shattered, battery box shattered, prop shaft bent and plastic gear shattered, the positive lead broke off the motor, and the nose was slightly rumpled, but surprisingly, the prop survived. When I ordered the Cub, I also ordered replacement prop drive shafts, hearing how easily they’re ruined. I epoxied in two pieces of foam, one against the firewall, and one in front of the Rx, making a snug space to put the battery. The gearbox went back together no problem, and I was able to solder the motor lead back on and was good to go (couldn’t glue the cowl back together, so it looks ugly till the new one arrives.)

In the meantime, I also bought an Aerobird Challenger, and I took that and the re-built Cub out yesterday. The day was a perfect 60F and ZERO wind. Flew the ugly Cub first and it was rock-solid stable and straight. Took it to 100’ and went around in circles for 5 minutes, landed with no nose-over, flew again till the battery was out and had another safe landing. I tried the Challenger next, not knowing what to expect, and was surprised to find that it’s as easy and stable as the Cub. I’m not ready to attempt aerobatics yet, so I just leave both on ½ throttle after climbing, and do gentle turns with the stock control throws dialed in. They both just putt putt around the sky like a dream, and seem like the easiest things in the world to fly. Then the wind picked up. By this time, I had the Cub back in the air with a ¾ charged battery, and suddenly noticed it acting a little erratic and difficult to control. I first thought the battery was going, but then I realized the wind picked up to 5mph with little gusts of about 8mph. I decided not to tempt fate, and brought the Cub in for a nice landing and called it a day. Next time, I'm going to remove the jumper that makes the Cub give it some up elevator when you turn the rudder. It definitely does help when you first start out, but now it's starting to get annoying when it does that, and I'd like to have full control myself.

Bottom line, if you have no wind at all, the Cub is a cinch to fly even for a beginner. Use small blips of control, keep throttle as low as possible after you reach altitude (you’ll go slower, making it easier to correct mistakes), and I also noticed that my Cub is easier to control with almost full down elevator trim. Otherwise it wants to keep nosing up a tad. If you lose control, and it's obvious that you're going to crash, try to remember to cut throttle to zero before you hit, b/c this might help save the prop and gearbox. Also, I recommend taking the cowl off until you’ve gotten the knack and are very comfortable flying. It may be ugly, but you’ll save yourself a few replacement cowls. Also, if you don’t already, order yourself a couple of extra prop shafts with plastic gear, and propellers. Sorry for the long post, but I wanted to share the lessons I learned, so that others will have as much success teaching themselves to fly, as me! Good luck!
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