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Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

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Old 03-07-2006, 09:33 AM
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Barry2
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Default Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

I am happy to report a very successful maiden flight this morning. I didn't have an instructor and the only thing I have ever flown is my Air Hogs Aero Ace, but I have a lot of time on that thing and I think it went a long way toward preparing me for the Aerobird Challenger.

I had the ABC in Pro Mode and I flew lazy ovals over the field and flat figure eights. After a little while, I worked on tightening up the turns and maintaining altitude in the turns. I also did a little diving and climbing and a couple of intentional stalls, some power off gliding and landing approaches to get more of a feel for the plane. I mostly flew at a quarter to half throttle to keep the speed down. The battery lasted about 15 minutes and then I glided in for a very gentle belly landing about 20 feet from where I was standing. I have a long way to go before I master this airplane, but I was basically in-control and confident during the maiden flight.

I had a huge field, which was nice since I never had to rush a turn and I never had to fly beyond the edge. The wind was variable up to maybe 5 mph which the airplane hardly noticed.

However, this was not actually my very first ABC flight. On my very first, very brief flight, I launched in Sport Mode and could not get any directional response whatsoever from the airplane. Even if I held the stick all the way over for several seconds, absolutely nothing. I think this was due to the tail being very much out of trim. I didn't know what the proper angle of the tail should be out of the box, but it was angled for a lot of nose-up and may have been flying on the edge of a stall. On my second attempt, I had the tail level with the tail boom and I switched to pro mode and everything went smoothly after that. I had ample yaw response even with slight movements of the stick.

And by the way, anyone interested in getting into this hobby on the cheap can not do much better than a $30 Aero Ace from Target and a slightly used ABC from eBay for about $75 shipped. You can also get extra upgraded batteries for the ABC, 2 for $20 + shipping at a couple of internet dealers. Not very painful at all and not too much at risk if things hadn't gone so well.

So, I have wanted to fly RC for decades and I feel like today I have finally begun! Thanks to RCUniverse and all here whose collective knowledge and advice has helped me get to this point, with special thanks to Ed Anderson and Leo L whose advice and replies have been particularly helpful. This is a nice community. I wouldn't be flying without you.
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Old 03-07-2006, 10:26 AM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

Congratulations! May your every flight be as successful as your first (second).

The ABC is a terrific plane. I'm sure that you will have lots of great experiences with it. Although I flew my ABC for several weeks in the Sport Mode, when I finally worked up the courage to try the Pro-Mode, I found that it flies much better in this mode. Eventually, you will want to convert the tail to a ProTail, which gives the plane truly terrific response, but that is way down the line. Enjoy! Let us know your progress.
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Old 03-07-2006, 10:32 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger


ORIGINAL: Barry2

So, I have wanted to fly RC for decades and I feel like today I have finally begun! Thanks to RCUniverse and all here whose collective knowledge and advice has helped me get to this point, with special thanks to Ed Anderson and Leo L whose advice and replies have been particularly helpful. This is a nice community. I wouldn't be flying without you.
Oh No, Leo L, is this one of your students? YOu know it is getting crowded up there. We have got to stop helping these guys!

Congratulations on your success with the Aerobird Challenger. I still enjoy mine!
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Old 03-08-2006, 04:30 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

Thanks for the replies and good wishes, guys. I've had 2 more flights now and both successful with no crashes and soft landings. The only mishap was a hand launch with the trim lever knocked all the way down. The airplane dove down to ground level as I grabbed for the stick and I managed to do sort of a touch and go, skimming through the grass for a couple of feet and then climbing out. But it continued flying, so I am not counting that as an official crash. I tried a spin and the recovery was smooth. I was even flying in 10 mph winds, which picked up to 15 as I was flying. Fast enough to hold the plane in place a couple of times. I even had an unintentional loop due to the wind. At that point, I knew I was in trouble, so I just started waiting and hoping for a lull to bring it down. I finally got a lull at 16 minutes, so my battery must have been seconds away from quitting. The landing was gentle with very low groundspeed due to the headwind.

I have to say that one real key to my good fortune has been having a very large field for flying. when I read the recommendation of 600x600 ft, I thought that was a bit excessive and I could get away with less. After flying an Aero Ace, it is hard to fathom using that kind of space. Another thing driving that belief is the fact that there are almost no open spaces around here that are that large. I am lucky to find a couple of athletic fileds adjacent to each other, and then there are often light poles, fences, goals, etc. in the way. I spent some time driving around looking for likely spaces and found a few farm fields that might serve, but nothing that was truly 600x600. Well, as luck would have it, I stumbled on some land that has been cleared for a future shopping center. They even planted grass on it, although it is still sparse. It is a good 1000x500 feet clear and really part of a larger tract that is 80% clear for 1000x1000 feet. I have plenty of elbow room for flying and I can't imagine trying to make my early flights in a space much smaller than the recommended 600x600. It is really nice not to have to overfly trees or traffic and to be able to make really huge landing patterns with long, shallow final approaches. I think my luck would have run out several times by now in a smaller field.

I am anxious for my skills to improve to the point that I would be comfortable in a smaller space, but for now I am flying in the BIG field.
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Old 03-08-2006, 06:16 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

There's a lot of very valuable information you're sharing here for first timers. Especially about the size of field required for first flights. Seems folks have a hard time believing that 600' x 600' thing ....

Among other reasons for your success were: not being afraid to go into pro mode right away in order to get good response from control inputs, throttle management, and feeling out the airplane slowly and in steps.

I had a tough first few flights a couple of years ago with the ABC. I didn't have enough width to fly in - only about 400 feet between houses and a road. I used too much throttle, and I found control response sluggish. Finding a bigger field and deciding to try pro mode was where I turned the corner.

Your disciplined ans systematic approach to learning the airplane helped you a lot. I wish I had done more of the same! But that's behind me now. I've graduated into glow and have my first couple of big gasser sport planes, too. It was the ABC that set the hook!

Enjoy!

BobbyG

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Old 03-09-2006, 04:22 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

Thanks for your comments. My mindset for learning this in stages comes in part from how real pilots go through training. They don't let you take a real airplane up on your first flight and do aerobatics. The first thing you work on is just flying straight and level. Then you work on shallow banked turns and you work your way up from there. Practicing landing approaches is done frequently because that is the one part of every flight that is mandatory. Experiencing a stall is important for safety while landing. Your first hour or two of flight training will probably not include much other than those things.

You can certainly speed that up for R/C flying, but the sequence makes sense. Some new R/C pilots report looping during their first few minutes, but also spinning in or cartwheeling the landing. An R/C pilot may not have his safety at risk like a real pilot, but the benefit to the R/C pilot is less time repairing and more time flying.

And to be honest, I did get a lot of the "just fly and crash" mentality out of my system while flying the Aero Ace. That is a great airplane to crash because you can't really hurt it or anything else. But the Aerobird will break and will cost money to fix.
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Old 03-10-2006, 12:38 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

I agree with you completely.
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Old 03-21-2006, 07:01 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

Good to here of your sucess. Where in NC do you live? In my area of Charlotte I have found some huge areas. I still can hit anything that the plane comes near.
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Old 03-22-2006, 08:46 AM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

ORIGINAL: one2lose2
Good to here of your sucess. Where in NC do you live? In my area of Charlotte I have found some huge areas. I still can hit anything that the plane comes near.
Thanks.

I live in Apex (Raleigh area). It seems like any open land has been developed into neighborhoods or shopping centers over the past few years. For my second airplane, I will be looking for something that requires minimal space to fly. I would love the convenience of being able to walk out of my garage and fly in my yard and street. Or at most a single athletic field. That would open up a lot more options. I now wish I had opted for the Slow Stick for that reason.
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Old 04-02-2006, 05:30 AM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

Barry2,

As you have seen on some of my posts, after thousands of flights with sailplanes, slope gliders, discus launched gliders and other electrics, my Aerobird continues to come to the field with me almost every time. That plane still lives in the car.

I power fly it, I thermal it and I slope soar it. It is just so versitile.

Glad you are enjoying yours.
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Old 04-02-2006, 10:55 AM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

Great job, man. . . the more I read I wished my Freedom would turn into a challenger. I think I made a goof there. Ohh well.
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Old 04-02-2006, 11:03 AM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

JC,

I saw your post in the Firebird Freedom thread. The Challenger does seem to be better for the new guys even though the Freedom was specifically designed for new flyers. Funny how that turns out.
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Old 04-02-2006, 04:46 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

Awesome job with the learning! I also learned on an Aerobird (actually a firebird scout, but that didn't help much cause my dad tried to fly it and crashed) and now have a stock Stryker that is just a blast to fly, but I'm going to have to convert to standard electronics soon because my Tx is stuck on low rates so I have everything as maxed out as possible. Not very pretty rolls here...same goes for inverted. I am attempting to tamper with 3D flying.

I don't fly my challenger much anymore...that's my dad's job. He is trying to learn on it, but he still crashes everysingle time on landings. Ugh...can't teach an old dog new tricks I suppose.

One question, how did you fly flat figure eights when the Challenger has no real rudder and no ailerons? That just confuses me.[&:]
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Old 04-02-2006, 07:26 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

Challenger has a rudder. It is made up of the action of the two tail surfaces working together to yaw the plane. A flat figure 8 means you maintain altitude, not that you side slip the plane. Ailerons are not necessary.
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Old 04-02-2006, 08:17 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

No kidding, I blame the folks at horizon/the runway blog. They swung me from the challenger. They said that one of their development engineers said handling wise, they were near identical - woops.
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Old 04-03-2006, 08:23 AM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

I have about 20 flights and about 5 hours on my ABC now and enjoying it very much. I recently mounted the landing gear and am practicing landings on pavement. I am also trying ROG take offs, which are pretty iffy with the ABC since there is inadequate directional control on the ground. I have had a few crashes, but only one that required some minor repair to fly again (lamp pole collision after a ROG in a tight area). I guess my early carefulness has given way to a little more risk-taking as I think more about moving on to a next airplane.

I have also experimented more with the "sport mode" and I still think the plane handles terribly in that mode. I would encourage new flyers to avoid the supposedly easier "sport mode" and go straight to "pro mode."

And yes, Ed, I am aware of how much you like your ABC. In fact, that was one of the main things that drove my decision to get one. I do not regret it at all and I think it is a fine airplane. I just can't fly it in my yard and I would love to have something that will meet that desire as well. I have been looking at FFF plans and may experiment with some of those.
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Old 04-03-2006, 08:31 AM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

If you want to fly in your yard, you need a slow flyer:

Slow stick - $35 - CL2/3
Best flown in still to under 5 mph breeze. This is an excellent choice for
people who have a smaller space to fly.
Can also be flown indoors in a gym or similar space.
http://www.gwsexpert.com/product_inf...&products_id=2
or
Slow stick Complete Package incl radio - $150
(need battery charger)
http://www.gwsexpert.com/product_inf...roducts_id=602
The Slow Stick Info Site
http://mattsrc.rchomepage.com/ssir/index.shtml
Review
http://www.rcuniverse.com/magazine/a...?article_id=75
Discussion Thread
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showt...hreadid=122951
souped up slow sticks - video
http://skrogg.com/wed.wmv

Tiger Moth - $50 CL 2/3
http://www.gwsexpert.com/product_inf...products_id=20
or
Tiger moth Complete Package incl. radio - $150
(need battery charger)
http://www.gwsexpert.com/product_inf...roducts_id=343
Best flown in still to under 5 mph breeze.
This is an excellent choice for people who have a smaller space to fly. Can
also be flown indoors in a gym or similar space. Cool looking little
plane.
http://www.horizonhobby.com/Shop/ByC...ProdID=GWS1020
Review
http://www.backyardflyer.com/BY/articles/tiger_moth.asp

Dusk Stik $40 CL2
Balsa Wood Kit
Similar to GWS Slow stick or ParkZone Slo-V in design
http://www.mountainmodels.com/duskstik.php
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=295225
Complete package with all electroncis - $112
http://www.mountainmodels.com/duskstik.php

T-IFO - $75 including Motor
http://www.flyifo.com/htmlpages/tifo.html
Complete package with radio - $275
http://www.flyifo.com/htmlpages/ordertifo.html#
Review
http://www.rcgroups.com/links/index.php?id=4117



If you dare to take a huge leap, maybe one of these small 3D planes will work for you in your yard. Most can fly pretty slow but you want to avoid wind. These are NOT beginner planes. You will want a computer radio with these.

Shockflyers - 3D
http://www.shockflyer.com/
Videos are at same link

Eagle 3D Foam ARF Aerobatic plane -
http://www.hobby-lobby.com/eagle.htm
REview
http://www.rcuniverse.com/magazine/a...?article_id=93
Video
http://www.hobby-lobby.com/media/POT006-Eagle1.wmv

The Cobra - 3 D Foam Flyer ARF
http://www.hobby-lobby.com/cobra.htm
video
http://www.hobby-lobby.com/media/POT007-Cobra2.wmv

Pigi - 3D Foam Flyer ARF
http://www.hobby-lobby.com/pigi.htm
video
http://www.hobby-lobby.com/media/CEM001-Pigi.wmv

Mini GeeBee - 3D Depron Flyer
http://www.hobby-lobby.com/minigeebee.htm
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Old 04-21-2006, 05:10 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

Barry,

Yeah, now you're makin me wish my FBC2 was a ABC! I bought if RTF off of eBay for about $75 and it flew pretty well with its anti-crash tech. For a while. Until I invited two of my friends to fly with me. Suicide. They thought that they were pros because they could fly their little Air Hogs Dominator around in circles. So I took them to a 400x600 park and made sure there was plenty of wind. I just did some basic flights first, mainly flat 8s and some spins. Had some real good landings and decided to hand it over to my budy. Like I said, suicide. Or bloody murder to the plane, depending on how you look at it. Yep, just like it sounds; took off perfectly, hit the wind, and "OH CRAP" lightpole. Done for a month. Wing was halved, prop was split, internal electronics were fried. Never had a chance...


PB_2
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Old 04-29-2006, 08:36 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

Lotsa wind and new flyers = disaster

Aerobird Challenger is the easiest to fly, and with mods can take lotsa abuse. And a little wind.
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Old 05-07-2006, 04:19 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

This plane is awesome, I just bought a stryker, but after my first outing and nosediving the poor stryker I decided to try flying a challenger before I put the stryker in the air again. The challenger is one tough bird! I crashed it at least 6 times, well a few of the crashes were really rough landings but I just readjusted the wing and tossed her in the air again. I do need a new wing though, my propped ripped a chunk out of the stock one. But even after it did that, I was curious to see if it would still fly...it DID!!! It was harder to control but manageable. The challenger is a great first plane...One thing I didnt like was the stock battery. No big deal I just ran my 7 cell from my stryker in her. I had to use a little electrical tape to keep the canopy flush with the fuselage though.
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Old 05-08-2006, 12:18 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

Use clear packing tape to repair the wing. You can usually re-form the wing where the prop took a bite of it with the tape. However, if the wing is creased, invest in a new one. You don't want to be flying and have the wing fold on you.
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Old 05-08-2006, 01:19 PM
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

I have been flying my original Aerobird since March 2003. I added an Aerobird
Challenger a 18 months ago. Between them I have over 600 flights. I love
them both!

Today my fleet consists of 2 Aerobirds, 3 other electrics, 7 thermal
duration sailplanes, two discus launched gliders and three slope gliders.

I added lights to the original Aerobird for night flight. That was
weird. It was like flying a ghost. You can't see the plane, only the lights.
They now have a night module for the challenger. I have that too.

I pounded the original Aerobird into the ground, destroyed three wings,
and two tails. I had to build a new motor mount because I destroyed that too.
All this, and the plane still flies, but it has taken a real beating. That is
what makes it such a great three channel beginner plane. Along the way I have
had to solve many problems because I was so reckless with it while I was
learning to fly it. So, I pass on what I have learned.

Fortunately the newer Challenger has had a somewhat easier life, but it still
gets banged around a bit because I will take risks with it that I would not
expose my other planes to, because I know it can take it, and if I destroy the
fuse, for $45 I get a new body, and all the electronics. So I can afford to
take chances with my challenger.

First - RTFM - If you lost your manual, you can download it here:
http://www.hobbyzonesports.com/Produ...BZ3500#manuals

Respect Wind

This plane can definitely fly in 12-15 mph winds. However wait till you have
mastered it. Most of my crashes came from flying in too much wind before I was
ready. Make your early flights in under 5 mph winds.

Always launch into the wind and land into the wind. And, fly with the wind
blowing toward you so the wind will not carry your plane away, it will tend to
bring it to you.

Motor Mount

This is the first thing you should do. Before you take a hard nose hit,
reinforce the motor mount. I will not elaborate here, visit this thread to
find the information. It contains advice from other pilots and what I finally
did to reinforce the mount. You should do this before you need it.
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showt...5&pagenumber=1
This thread was posted by someone did an excellent job using photos to show
how to do the motor mount modification. I encourage you to make this
modification.
http://www.rc-forums.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=1173

Here are also some shots of the control board out of the plane which can be
helpful.
http://www.shutterfly.com/osi.jsp?i=...21b325c2c38435


Plane Does Not Fly Straight - what could cause this?

Assuming you have not displaced the motor, and you are having
problems with the plane not flying straight, check the following:

a)) Check the trim adjustments. They may have been moved from center. Set
them to center and make all adjustments assuming you will fly with the trim
set in the center.

b)Make sure the moveable surfaces are even with the fixed surfaces on the
tail when the stick is centered and the trim levers are centered. You MUST
check this with the transmitter on and the battery attached. If they are not
even, adjust them with the screws on the control horns. The procedure is in
the manual. RTFM

Note, there is a tiny Phillips head screw on the back of the control horn on
the tail. Tighten it or the spool could unwind while the plane is in the
air, causing a crash. (Guess how I know this!)

c) Check to see that the boom is solidly attached at the body. If this comes
loose, it can move around while the plane is flying causing all kinds of
problems. It can also twist so that the tail is no longer aligned.

If you look at where the boom is attached inside there is a pinched area. I
drilled a small hole through the top of that area and through the boom. Then
I put a 4" nylon tie through to help secure the boom. I also put packing tape
around the boom and the back of the body where the boom exits. Between the
two, the boom is well secured.

d) is the wing crooked or too damaged - try a new wing.

e) Check the tail. The foam is attached to the center plastic brace by small
pieces that punch through the foam. These can loosen up and the tail fin can
move slightly away from the plastic brace in the air which can cause the plane
to turn.

Tape or glue the tail fins to the center plastic brace. Also, look for creases
in the foam. If there is a weak spot, the tail will flex causing the plane to
turn. mine was creased at the
meeting point where the plastic support meets the tail. Looked fine on the
ground, but it was flexing in the air causing a hard right turn leading to
crashes. Replace the tail.


The Porpoise

When you apply power the plane starts to climb then noses up, then the nose
drops and it does it all over again. This is called a stall. The problem is
that the tail needs to be trimmed, the front is too low or the back is too
high. This causes an up elevator effect. Adjust the orange screws on the
tail. The procedure is in your instruction book. RTFM You might have to slip
a piece of thin cardboard under the front if the front is too low, to shim it
up slightly.


The Tail is a Pull-Pull System.

The tail is based on tension of a rubber band below the tail pulling against
the servos in the plane. You must make sure that these are in proper
adjustment or your trim will go out or your responsiveness will go down.

The tension on the lines to the tail is held by a friction hold on the
adjustment spools. Well they can slip a bit from time to time. Just remember
to check your tail adjustments before every flight. Also, there are little
screws on the back of the adjusters. I make sure they are tight before the
start of each day's flying.

Finally, the rubber band below the tail does get weak after a while,
especially if you leave the plane in a hot car. That rubber band is the
second pull, with the servos being the first. If it gets weak, you have to
replace it. If you don't, you won't get much down elevator and in pro mode
part of the rudder effect will not be as strong.

Longer flights

Back off on the power. Both the 6 and 7 cell battery will last six to
seven minutes at full power. However, if you back off to half power, your
flights can last 12-15 minutes depending on how you fly. You can even
catch thermals with the Aerobird and riding them for long long flights with
the motor off. I also slope soar mine. On the slope you can stay up for over
an hour with the motor off.

If you charged your batteries a few days ago, top them up just before
flying. They lose charge just sitting around.

Neck Strap for the Transmitter

If you look at the high priced Futaba, Hitec and other radios, they have a
place where you can clip a cord so that the radio can hang from a neck strap,
leaving your hands free to make adjustments on the plane. This is very
convenient.

Take a large paper clip and bend up the center piece in the middle to make a
place where you can clip a neck strap to it. Now take some sand paper and
sand a spot in the center of the radio. Epoxy the paperclip to the radio. Use
plenty so you can really embed the clip in the epoxy.

Reinforce the Wing

Got to Office Depot, or one of the other stores and get some glass reinforced
tape. The type that has a cross
pattern is best.
http://www.officedepot.com/ddMain.do...5001_FM_171926
Put a piece on either side of trailing edge where the prop wants to bite the
wing if a landing is a little rough. Also centered in the front 6" on either
side of the body to help resist damage from the rubber bands. The newer wings
may come reinforced but you may wish to do this anyway.

Make sure you have a spare prop, they're cheap. Since the prop is less likely
to cut the reinforced wing, if it hits the wing, it might pop the prop off, or
break it. However normally this does not happen.

If you get a crease or a fold in the wing from a rough landing, this will be a
weak area. The foam is compressed and the wing will tend to fold up under
stress. I have a procedure for fixing wings. Post if you need it and I will
post it for you.

Learn to Glide in for a Landing

If you run the battery too long, the speed control will cut the power to the
motor while preserving power for the control surfaces. This is good! If you
learn to land with the power off, if you get caught in the air with no motor,
you will have no problem landing. Gliding in, even from 500 feet, in 15 mph
winds is my standard way of landing. In calmer air, the plane pretty much
lands itself from 10 feet in the air.

Parts

These planes have a great distribution system. Parts are very readily found
in most hobby stores. However if you can't get what you need, look here:
http://www.hobbyzonesports.com/Support/


HobbyZoneSports Frequently Asked Questions - Couldn't hurt to look!
http://www.hobbyzonesports.com/Support/FAQ.aspx

Plane Locator

When I was learning, or today if I fly strong winds, I use one of these on the
plane and one stays in my pocket.
If I put the plane down in very tall grass, or in the woods ( don't ask ) it
can be hard to find. If I am looking for the plane, I click the one in my
hand and the one on the plane answers. If you fly near woods, swamps, tall
grass, etc., get one of these. I mount it under the rubber bands that holds
on the wing. Doesn't seem to hurt the lift much at all.
www.keyringer.com

Summary

Here are a few tips to help you live happily with your Aerobird and
help it survive your poor piloting skills. With a little luck, the plane will
make it through the tough part of your training as you pound it into the
ground trying to learn to fly. Don't give up! Avoid the wind, take your time
and you will get it!

Six Keys to Success
http://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=18

Oh, and RTFM ..... read the friendly manual!!!! :-)


------------------
Best regards
AEAJR
www.lisf.org
www.rcezine.com
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Old 05-09-2006, 07:57 PM
  #23  
zero74
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

thanks for the tip, I was going to buy a new wing, but decided to try your way first. I might as well get everything I can out of this wing, as I am sure I will need to buy a replacement in the future, but what the rush?
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Old 05-09-2006, 08:06 PM
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aeajr
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

Buy the new wing. Buy two. If you fly enough you will use them. I have 3 wings in the box all the time. Two are repaired and one is new. The new one is when I plan to do some thermaling and need the best glide I can get. Otherwise I fly the repaired wings. They are not as good as a clean wing but it flies and it is fun.

Face it, you are going to damage the wing. Always have a spare, they are cheap! This way if you damage the wing, you just swap and fly.
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Old 05-10-2006, 06:51 AM
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Leo L
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Default RE: Successful 1st flight: novice & Aerobird Challenger

I have two wings in my box. One is the original, with several repairs, which I use most of the time. The second is a "new" undamaged wing, that I reinforced with carbon rods. I use this wing when I'm in the mood to do some hard flying, making the plane loop, roll and twist as much as possible.
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