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Aerobird Challenger

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Old 03-13-2006, 03:54 AM
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skyblue
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Default Aerobird Challenger

If you own a Aerobird I was wondering how well does it handel strong winds,lets say 20 - 25 mph. Phil
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Old 03-13-2006, 08:35 AM
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Default RE: Aerobird Challenger


ORIGINAL: skyblue

If you own a Aerobird I was wondering how well does it handel strong winds,lets say 20 - 25 mph. Phil

It don't.

BobbyG

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Old 03-13-2006, 08:37 AM
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Barry2
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Default RE: Aerobird Challenger

It would be flying backwards. In my opinion, anything over 10mph and it is mosthly just fighting the wind.
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Old 03-13-2006, 11:22 AM
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Leo L
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Default RE: Aerobird Challenger

I don't know of any electrics that will handle 20-25 mph winds.
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Old 04-02-2006, 05:39 AM
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Default RE: Aerobird Challenger

I have flown the Aerobird in clocked 18 mph winds. Not really a lot of fun and the ground turbulance will really want to destroy the plane, so I would say not a good plane for those conditions.

If you want to fly in that kind of wind, you want something much heavier and probably much larger. Look for something in excess of 5 pounds with a wing loading of 20 oz/sq in and probably something over 66 inch wing span. This is where weight is an aid. You use Nimh packs rather than Lithium because you want the weight.

Also look to have a power system running in excess of 75 watts per pound using a brushless motor. For a 4 pound plane that would be 300 watts or higher, say 10 cell Nimh Sub C 3600 mah packs for 12 Volts and 35+ amps

Even at that, 25 mph is a lot of wind for any model plane.

On the other hand, for slope soaring, 25 mph is great conditions for electric or unpowered slope gliders that stay in the air for hours at a time. If you have a good slope nearby, that would be a better path.

An Aerobird Challenger slopes quite nicely in 10-15 mph winds and might handle 25 mph winds if you added about 3-4 ounces of weight to it. If you are an agressive pilot, you migt want to reinforce the wing with some 1/32 ply or embed dowl into the wing.

If you want to check out slope soaring, these might be interesting
introductions. There are also photo and video links.

How Slope Soaring Works
http://users.iafrica.com/s/st/stevemac/afc/ssoar.html

Slope Soaring Internet Magazine
http://inlandsloperebels.com/slopeflyer/slopeflyer.html

Photos of an inland slope site with some nice planes
This is atop a closed landfill
http://home.att.net/~charles.french/CASA/JEFindex.html

Introduction to Slope Soaring - part of larger sailplane intro
http://home.att.net/~charles.french/...lopeIntro.html

Slope soaring Tips for Beginners
http://www.shallowsky.com/planes/weasel/slopetips.html

Videos of slope soaring - hope you have high speed line
http://www.combatwings.com/catalog/i...lopecombat.asf
http://www.dream-flight.com/moviefil...aselmaiden.wmv
http://www.windrider.com.hk/image/Ea..._small.mpg.wmv
http://www.windrider.com.hk/image/Easy_Pro_test_9.mpg
http://www.combatwings.com/catalog/i...ompetition.asf
http://www.combatwings.com/catalog/i..._lb_combat.asf

thread of photos of slope planes being launched. Gives a good view of some
slope sites.
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=350802

Dynamic Slope Soaring - definately NOT for beginners
Extreme Speed slope soaring
http://www.billpattersonart.com/dszone.swf

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Old 04-02-2006, 04:49 PM
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Default RE: Aerobird Challenger

If you want to fly something in those winds, you better go get one of those 90 inch glow planes. Nothing else would survive except for gliders...they like that kind of stuff.

If you don't want to do that, you better find a really nice indoor site.[>:]
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Old 04-04-2006, 09:54 PM
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Default RE: Aerobird Challenger

Well, I just flew mine tonight in a little over 10 mph winds this afternoon. I have been looking at it about 40 feet up stuck in an oak tree for the rest of the evening. This was the first flight this season and usually in a bit of wind, I will put it into pro mode but this time it slipped my mind. Also, I think after sitting over the winter the control lines stretched a bit because just after launching, I could tell that the controls were a bit "squishy" and un-responsive.

As I went up and got above the trees, the plane got taken a bit by the wind. Usually not a big deal, but without pro mode and squishy controls it was a bit tough but I managed to get it nearly back to my 300 foot x 900 foot field. I knew it was close, but I thought I had it clear of the trees but it just tipped and got "sucked in".

Anyone got any ideas on how to get an Aerobird Challenger out of a 40 foot tree? This is a first for me.

Moral: Check out your equipment......

JSF
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Old 04-04-2006, 10:16 PM
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Default RE: Aerobird Challenger

Getting Planes out of Trees


I don't know if trees and planes are attracted to each other like magnets, but
somehow we seem to be pulling someone out of a tree every few weeks.
Fortunately it is not me these days, though I am sure I will find one again.
I can see them reaching for the plane as I fly by. The guys tell me it is the
wind, but I think they are calling my plane.

So, how do you get your plane out of a tree? Here are some methods I use, or
have seen used. Some are simple and cheap. Some are complex and some are
expensive. You have to decide which to use and when.

In my book, chain saws, axes and things that will kill the tree are not an
option. Call me a tree hugger, but I just can't see cutting down a tree to
get a plane. There is usually a better option.

I am going to list the ones I know, roughly in effective range. I hope you
can provide some others, preferably before I need them.

8-12 Feet (2-4 meters) -

Good old hand reach combined with anything to stand on and maybe a local stick
or branch - Cost $0

10-30 Feet (3-10 meters) -

When I fly I bring a 6 foot extension pole for a paint roller that I purchased
in Home Depot for $14. It extends to 12 feet. I have seen 4, 8 and 10
footers that double as well. I also saw an 8 footer that almost triples to
about 22 feet. If you use some tape you can tape 2-3 of these together to
reach higher.

15-50 Feet (5-16 meters) - ( I have too much experience at this height)

I carry a spool of 130 pound test mason's line in my field box that has an 8
ounce rounded fishing weight attached to it. Costs about $5 total. With a
good throw I can usually get it up and over the branch holding the plane so I
can shake it free. Hitting the branch can take lots of throws and hitting the
plane is a real risk, but it is better than leaving it there. If your plane
is sitting on a very strong branch, use the lighter line to pull up a heavier
line.

Monofiliment fishing line works very well too at it will slide down over the
branch more easily than the mason's line. I use 3-4 foot piece of rope with
weight on the end which I attach to the fishing line with a snap. The rope is
easier to grab to make the toss and it is easy to remove. Works very well.
Plumbing parts, big bolts, anything can be used to weight the rope so it will
go up to where the plane lies. 50 feet is about the max I have ever been able
to reach this way and it is hard to get the line up that high.

A spinning rod with a weight migh also work if you are talented with such
things, but 60 feet would be my guestimate on the limit on this.

Another way is to use aluminum downspouts, typically used for house gutter
system. Home Depot, Lowes and other home centers have them. They can be
taped together. Use something to bridge the joint to help keep them erect.
They are very light and fairly rigid. You can probably get up to 5 sections
reaching about 50 feet. Not sure if you can go much beyond that. Friends
have had good success with this.

30-100 feet (9-32 meters) -

A bow and arrow might work well at this height, but you'll have to develop
some skill
in order to get the needed accuracy. I estimate this at $50-$100 - One
problem is that you can get the arrow stuck on a different branch which only
compounds your problem. The line will have to be light, such as 5-10 lbs test
monofiliment fishing line, so use it to pull up
heavier line or so you can break it if the arrow gets stuck.

Other methods I have heard about but never used or witnessed.

Tree climber - Somehow every RC club has the phone number of a guy who climbs
trees for a fee.

Helo - I heard of one guy who used an electric helo to fly a line and weight
up and had some kind of release to drop it onto the branch. Sounds like a
good justification for a helo when I speak with my wife.

A really original idea

Control line kite - This one surprised me, but one of our members got his
plane stuck in the top of a high tree, over 100 feet up. He also flies the
large kites that look like arc shaped parachutes. He has two control lines on
the kite that let him direct it, dive it and move it around the sky. He used
it to attack the tree until the tree gave up the plane. I like the idea of
attacking the tree without actually hurting it!

A Wanger - A device specifically for getting planes out of trees
http://www.slopeflyer.com/artman/pub...rticle_6.shtml
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