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"Windy" trainer

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Old 05-14-2006, 05:56 PM
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kulgan
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Default "Windy" trainer

I'm a newbie looking to buy a plane. I have been playing around with an Areoace and having a lot of fun. One of the problems I have (other than being old) is that I live in Nebraska and it is rarely "wind free". When I am first learning I will wait for calm conditions but I wonder which trainers are better in the wind. I've read that the Megatech Freedom Flyer is OK in the wind, not crazy about the brand but it seems like a decent plane. Others I'm considering are the EasyStar, Areobird Challenger and T-Hawk. Is one of these OK in 10-ish mph winds after I have some experience or is there a better choice. Thanks.
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Old 05-14-2006, 07:45 PM
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Leo L
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Default RE: "Windy" trainer

The EasyStar is probably the best beginner plane at handling wind.
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Old 05-14-2006, 08:25 PM
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Default RE: "Windy" trainer

ORIGINAL: kulgan
I'm a newbie looking to buy a plane. I have been playing around with an Areoace and having a lot of fun. One of the problems I have (other than being old) is that I live in Nebraska and it is rarely "wind free". When I am first learning I will wait for calm conditions but I wonder which trainers are better in the wind. I've read that the Megatech Freedom Flyer is OK in the wind, not crazy about the brand but it seems like a decent plane. Others I'm considering are the EasyStar, Areobird Challenger and T-Hawk. Is one of these OK in 10-ish mph winds after I have some experience or is there a better choice. Thanks.
kulgan,

I have not found a good electric trainer for "windy" conditions. All of the ones I'm familiar with are too light. That said, I would suggest you seriously consider the "EasyStar". I believe it will meet your needs and will definitely handle higher winds than the Challenger or the T-Hawk, Also I believer it will do as well or better than the Freedom Flyer.

I grew up about 65 miles west of Lincoln (long before I could afford RC aircraft) and understand about the Nebraska winds. In fact, the first time I flew an rc model in Nebraska was a 'demonstration flight' during the county airport's 'Grand Opening.' It was at my Dad's request in an attempt to trigger an interest in RC in the Aurora area. That early April day was cold and misty, with the clouds zipping by about 100-150 feet overhead. The winds were 18 mph, often gusting to near 30. Fortunately, the wind was staight along the taxiway we were to use for takeoff and landing. Dad carried my Sterling Fledgling out, set it down and pointed into the wind. I powered up, he released and I took off in about five feet. I flew a few patterns, very fast downwind and barely moving going upwind at full throttle. I actually backed it up, for about 80 feet, on one pass. Landing was worrysome, but proved unevetfull as I brought her in with about half throttle, placed the gear on the runway and Dad walked behind it and grabbed it before I pulled to idle. Unfortunately, although my efforts gained applause and back slapping they did not cause anyone new to start flying. I suspect limited finances in the mid 1970s was the prime factor. Although Dad passed away before he could see it there is now an RC Flying Club situated in one corner of the airport.
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Old 05-17-2006, 07:08 AM
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http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=354596
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Old 05-17-2006, 02:55 PM
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Default RE: "Windy" trainer

At the risk of sounding harsh:

Don't try to train in the wind Period. You are looking for trouble with any beginner plane.

Easy Star 24oz, 400 motor, 54" wingspan, Foam

Aerobird Challenger 17oz, 400 motor, 42" wingspan, Plastic w/foam behind nose

T- Hawk 18oz, 400 motor, 40" wingspan, Plastic w/foam behind nose


I found my Easy Star to be a bit under powered as it is heavier than the Challenger or the T-Hawk. I also do not prefer foam nosed planes, because in a crash the foam may crack completely and then you are left to taping the entire nose back on. I also don't like foam covered battery compartments, because the foam quickly stretches and or small pieces of it come off and you have trouble keeping the battery in the plane. I like battery compartments to be made with a more secure cover.

The turning surfaces of the East Star also appear to be a bit small for the size of the wing for my taste. Yes the Easy Star will thermal just like every other plane once you manage to get it high enough in the air. It is also a BIG plane to try and throw yourself and hold the radio at the same time, you better be quick because you'll need all the up elevator you can get just after launching.

As you might have guessed I prefer the other 2 planes I listed to the Easy Star.

Don't listen to fancy names every manufacturer has for their product :

Durable new crash resistant Foam..............means Styrofoam

tough crash tolerant construction............... means Plastic
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Old 05-18-2006, 08:24 PM
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Default RE: "Windy" trainer

I fly my EasyStar in anything up to about 20 MPH wind. I recommend it very highly for windy day flying.

The EasyStar is not made of Styrofoam, it is made out of a MUCH more durable foam that will handle a lot of abuse.

Tom Moody
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Old 05-19-2006, 05:47 AM
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Default RE: "Windy" trainer

Thanks to all who have replied with sugestions.

SUPERGONZO--No, I'm won't try to train in the wind. I'm leaning toward the AeroBird, parts are available locally. I know the electronics aren't "reuseable" but I think it will still be a fun plane to have as I move up. The EasyStar just seems so darn big and boring, which is probably good for a trainer, but the plane just doesn't "do it" for me.
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Old 05-19-2006, 09:37 AM
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Default RE: "Windy" trainer

My suggestion of the EasyStar was specifically made in response to your query regarding planes that will handle the wind. Wind aside, the Aerobird is a terrific plane. With its current price dropped to $109 (and even cheaper on e-bay) this plane is a terrific bargain. Its very resistant to damage and parts are readily available. I started flying last spring with the Firebird Commander. During the summer I started flying the Aerobird. Since then I have four other planes that I fly, but the Aerobird is always one of the planes that I bring to the field. Its a terrific plane, plus it easily stores in its original shipping box, which means that it permanently resides in the trunk of my car, for those times when I'm on the way home from work, there happens to be no wind, and I have some time to spare.
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Old 07-09-2006, 03:42 PM
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Default RE: "Windy" trainer

The Easy Star in my book is the best trainer I have found. I have flown it in wind and it is manageable up to about 8 MPH. Have hit a tree with the wing and it wasn't damaged. The made claim of resilient and repairable "Elapor" foam is very true and unlike regular foam is repairable with CA and accelerator (the CA didn't melt the EPP) Saying all foam is the same to me is the same as saying all water is water whether it has salt in it or not. As for launching the East Star once its trimmed you can hand launch with the transmitter on the ground and pick it up as the Easy star is climbing out by it self. Quick action on the sticks is not need after launch. The width of the body is not a problem as there is enough power that a hard throw is not needed
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