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New to electrics, not flying

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Old 12-27-2006, 03:13 AM
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Underaged Pilot
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Default New to electrics, not flying

Is there somewhere I can go to learn everything there is to know? Mainly I need to learn about ESC's, I've been flying glow for about 3 years and just got a slow flyer for christmas I'm REALLY happy with.
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Jerry Jacobs
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Old 12-27-2006, 08:14 AM
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benbailey50
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Default RE: New to electrics, not flying

Hi Jerry.


ESC-(electronic speed controller) recives a signal from the rx and controls the speed of the motor.

Also with the ESC, you will have to set the cut off voltage, as per instructions.

Hope that this helps you.

Ben.
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Old 12-27-2006, 02:40 PM
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Default RE: New to electrics, not flying

Ok, I'm working on the GWS A-10 and have the C-7 Nano High Freq. ESC from Great Planes, I've heard these do not work with EDF's, is that true? Also I thought there were 2 batteries in an electric plane, one for the engine, the other for the RX.
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Jerry Jacobs
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Old 12-27-2006, 07:12 PM
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Default RE: New to electrics, not flying

In most electric planes, there is only one battery. The battery connects to the ESC.

The ESC has a built-in battery eliminator circuit (BEC). The BEC regulates the battery voltage down to a voltage that is safe for the RX and servos. By plugging the ESC into the RX's throttle channel, you feed the regulated voltage to the RX.

On large/expensive electric planes, a separate RX battery pack is sometimes used. This is done so that a failure of the ESC won't leave you without power for the RX. But on small e-planes, the extra weight penalty of a second battery is not desireable, and so the ESC's BEC is the source of power for the RX.

Another solution is to use a separate, dedicated BEC to provide power to the RX. This lets you use only one battery while not relying on the ESC's BEC. There are some very small BECs available, so the weight penalty is small.

The bottom line is that for most small e-planes, a ESC and its built-in BEC is the solution.

- Jeff
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Old 01-03-2007, 12:00 AM
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hawk3ye
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Default RE: New to electrics, not flying

Edit: My Bad, asked the same quetsion in the same forum heh
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