Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Results 1 to 5 of 5

  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Mexico city, MEXICO
    Posts
    346
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    Question about Porting

    Hello Everyone.

    Ive managed to get my self a Toro 25.4 cc engine,

    My questions are:

    1.- Ive read that porting this engines would help improving power to weight ratio, is the improvement achieved significant, on a 25cc engine how much RPM would they normaly increase?
    2.- If I understand correctly what has to be done is to make deeper and wider the intake ports of the engines, but how far should I go?
    3.- Another thing to be done is to widen the exhaust port sanding only on the down and on the sides (not on the top of it), Im I right?
    4.- Should intake transfer porting be done with the Moto Tool with a grinding stone, or how do you do it?


    Sorry for so much question but I have never port any engine and from what IΒ΄ve listen at my flying field if you go to far porting you will end up with and unusable engine.

    I fly at a very high altitude in MΓ©xico city so engines are quite impacted on their power output so these would be a great fix for my engines.

    In advances thank you very much

    Best Regards
    VΓ*ctor.
    If I say that the Burra is Prieta is because I have the pelos in my hand.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Salinas, CA
    Posts
    821
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Question about Porting

    Messing with the ports is a tricky thing. I have done it on two engines and both got a little better then after a point they were ruined. Not having a lot of experience I did not know when to stop. I would reccomend a bigger engine.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    hartford, CT
    Posts
    602
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Question about Porting

    You don't see discussion about porting on here because most of them don't know much about it.Do a search on Gordon Jennings and bone up on the basics.You are off to a bad start not only with your current line of thought but the toro is a bad choice to modify.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    chambersburg, PA
    Posts
    13
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Question about Porting

    you are talking about toro the weed eater motor correct? yes porting makes a huge diff, i run nitro trucks.and all of my motors i port and polish the crank,port the intake and exhaust ports on the sleeve.usually i get up to 50% more on the bottom endand depending on the engine 1,000+more rpm.but i would not attempt to do it yourself the first time,all it takes is one little miss cut and its done.or you could over do it and blow up the engine in no time and or lose power and it's slower then before.have someone do it and watch and learn,or youtubehas vids on how to do it.here's some mor info for ya.hope it helps<meta name="verify-v1" content="se6WGlvKDdjgXF1zvkrWwPRAMuL14GiaK/BKY8CLjKA=" />

    Porting - 2-Stroke



    If you look into the intake and exhaust ports of a stock 2-stroke cylinder you will find casting seams that are rough and on some engines depending on manufacturer or hours of use, you will also notice paint in the ports themselves. These are some of the first problems that a porting job will address. Every surface anomaly effects the air flow through the engine. By surfacing or resurfacing the walls of the intake or exhaust port, we are reducing drag (or air turbulence) and increasing air flow. Although you may not think so, this alone will make a noticeable difference in performance, even on an otherwise completely stock engine, but it gets better.



    Cylinders basically consist of two parts, the casted "housing" and the cylinder sleeve which is pressed into the housing. Besides the larger ports you see on each side of the cylinder where the reed cage and exhaust are mounted, there are also other channels, namely "transfer ports" that come up from the base of the cylinder along the sides of the sleeve and connect into the cylinder. At the factory, these cylinder/sleeve assemblies are mass produced. Almost always (yet some are way worse than others) the holes in the sleeve do not quite line up with the transfer ports that are opening into them. The result is an obstruction for the air/fuel mixture similar to someone driving straight into a solid wall. This is where porting makes another improvement. By cutting out the "wall" the air/fuel mixture is allowed to flow much more smoothly.



    Another obstruction you will notice on a stock cylinder is the bridge that divides certain ports. Generally, these are cast as a flat surface that the intake mixture will run right into, much like the offset sleeves mentioned above. These pillars are extremely important, but they can be extremely improved as well. Instead of having a single flat surface to slow things down, these can be "knife-edged" to cause the air/fuel mixture to slide right by them with minimal resistance. Some engines also have "blocks" that are cast into the ports that also serve as air flow obstruction, these can be also be angled to allow the air to flow over them.



    In addition to these problem areas that every engine can benefit from having modified, porting can also take the improvements a step further. The above mentioned aspects are basically about getting the most out of what you have without really effecting how the engine operates. Now it is time to talk about major engine modifications. Please note that these are the areas where experience really shines through and it is easy to make an engine perform worse than it did as stock.



    The first on the "high performance" list is expanding the size of the ports. Anytime we modify the way an engine operates (or more specifically, the way air travels though it) we have to plan for a counter modification to keep everything in sync. For example, modifying the size of the intake port might also require a "balanced" increase in exhaust port size. It is not always equal however, depending on the engine and the application, this type of modification can be used to not only increase air flow, but also to tweak the engine's performance even more. Experience is a necessity!



    The last engine modification we will talk about is port raising and lowering. This is the "finest" tunning that can be done on a high performance 2-stroke engine. The idea is to "move" the intake and exhaust openings in the cylinder. This adjusts valve timing in 2-strokes and just as in enlarging ports from the last paragraph, there is planning that must be done ahead of time. When we change the valve timing we also change the compression, there are areas in the system that can be optimized according to other engine components (big bore, stoker crank, etc.). Again this take a thorough understanding of how an engine works with certain performance upgrades.



    If some of the modifications (especially the first ones) do not seem like they would have that great of an impact on performance, think about this. An engine running at 6,000 RPMs (which is nothing for a 2-stroke) must get the fuel it needs in and the exhaust is has produced out 100 times every second otherwise it can't preform or even worse, it could burn up in no time.



    Now, a final note about multi-cylinder 2-stroke engines (or any multi cylinder engine for that matter). When doing modifications such as these, from the simplest "clean up" to the most advanced upgrade, on engines with more than a single cylinder it is extremely important to have each cylinder modified as close to exactly the same as humanly possible. The required precision instruments for measuring and the very closest attention to detail. Now think about a performance engine running at 15,000 RPM. The slightest difference can cause one cylinder to run leaner than another and at that speed it can't last.

    <iframe id="aswift_0" height="600" marginheight="0" frameborder="0" width="160" allowtransparency="allowtransparency" name="aswift_0" marginwidth="0" scrolling="no" style="position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px">
    Design downloaded from Free Templates - your source for free web templates
    Supported by Hosting24.com
    Pozycjonowanie

  5. #5

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Mexico city, MEXICO
    Posts
    346
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: Question about Porting

    Thanks everyone,

    It does seem I wiould be better off leaving the engine as it is, and try only to adapt a free flow muffler and a bigger 12.7 mm carb and see if with this tweaks I can get close to 8K RPMΒ΄s with a 16x8 prop.

    Anyway IΒ΄ll try to get my hands on an older engine to tweak it and learn how to port and modify a 2 stroke engine.

    Thank you very much.

    If I say that the Burra is Prieta is because I have the pelos in my hand.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:29 AM.

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.