Extreme Speed Prop Planes Discuss the need for speed with fast prop planes (Screamin Demon, Diamond Dust, Shrikes or any REAL sound breakin'''' plane)

Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Reply

Old 04-13-2006, 09:47 AM
  #1  
j0rrit
Member
Thread Starter
 
j0rrit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Almere, NETHERLANDS
Posts: 56
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Currently we're building two Stiletto speedmodels at my local club. Maybe you're interested also, and therefore I came to the idea of starting a topic here at RC-Universe. Lots of speed fanatics are gathering here and it's always fun to follow somebody building a plane. Hope you'll enjoy it also!

The Stiletto is original a Club20 pylonrace model, powered with a .20 size engine with side-exhaust. Since I don't participate at Pylon-competitions it was possible to exchange the wing for a faster example. It's the same wing that is used on the Kasumi from Corvidae / Jet & Speedmodels.

The models were made from fiberglass and carbon to consolidate the model. Color was sprayed on in the template before adding epoxy resin and glass. Peter Pankras, who has made these models, has added glitter powder to the paint to give it a 'bling' effect. (Just like what they like on MTV )This gives it a very nice finish and looks very cool.


The moulds with paint sprayed, ready to add glass and carbon.


Both sides are soaked in epoxy resin, now the moulds can be closed.


Feels like Christmas, opening the moulds after 24 hours hardening.


The cowl for the tuned pipe to reduce drag.


The fuselage is taken out of the template. Edges need to be finished with a Dremel cutter and gets a warm bad of water to remove PVA and wax.




CNC milled parts from the stab's. It's made of 2 layers balsa with 0,3mm plywood in between. Laminated with epoxy and hinging material was added.


All the components. Styropor core with glass reinforcements between the top layer and core. There is also hinge material added between the top layer and core.


The stabilizer finished.


Jorrit's Stiletto. Quite a hell to make with the silver glitter material. After 5 minutes of laminating you lose track of what you're doing.




This is where the wing is made of. The 24 hours epoxy will be rolled on with a roller.


The epoxy after 15 minutes. It's a sort of foam that fills the gaps completely with a very strong wing as result.



The next day the epoxy resin is cured.








And the Stiletto's ware delivered. Both fuses are very nice. Great finish! Should be looking very cool with the colorscheme I have in mind.

The box, large package.






Unwrapped the materials.


2 masterpieces!


Package of small components with the wingtips, carbon strings, heavy glass, plywood CNC material and an aluminum engine mount for the Rossi 21.




Both Rossi R21 engines arrived! Great service from RC-Technik! 4x APC 6,5x6 props included and 4x Rossi glow plugs R5 and R6.

Package with receipt.


All components gathered for the picture.




Silencer, which silencer? Open tuned pipe!




Great finish looks very good!




Started building the Stiletto.


Pine-wood leading edge. Less fragile compared to balsa.


Wingtips sawed off and sanded into shape.






Both wings glued together at a 3° angle with some 30 min. epoxy.


Gap for the wingspar.


Milled holes free from styropor to fit the servos.


Both holes empty. Only problem is the location of the holes. The Hitec HS85-MG servos are too thick to fit inside the profile, and to fit the hatch on top. The hatch will be sticking out of the profile. The only solution I can think of is using aerodynamic pushrod plates.


Use personal protection while using G4. It's not good for your health.


Added some 80grams fiberglass to reinforce the wing.




This topic needs an update. ;-)

The wing dowels are glued into place

















I bought two Hitec Hs81-MG servo's because the Hs85-MG was to big to fit nicely.








The wing, bottom view with fresh G4 and glass. I'm very sure this will work out very well instead of Epoxy.




Upper side is also covered with glass.




Wing sanded and mounted at the fuselage.


Very nice result, very smooth.




I was thinking about how to control the elevator. Using a Y-link is possible, but you need to attach 2 rudderhorns on each side of the elevator, which causes extra drag later on. What do you think about trying to fit the steering rods inside the fuse? It isn't possible to do maintenance after fixing the stabilo with epoxy, but therefore I want to use ball links. What do you advice? I'm not sure about the setup I'm planning to use.

Does anyone have any pictures or ideas how to get this problem solved the best way? I would be very thankful!

Simple drawing. Yellow is epoxy to fix the bended rods.
j0rrit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2006, 01:41 AM
  #2  
jbel
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: , CA
Posts: 67
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

were can i can mine? are they still making the stinger and others?
jbel is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2006, 07:08 AM
  #3  
j0rrit
Member
Thread Starter
 
j0rrit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Almere, NETHERLANDS
Posts: 56
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

The owner of Corvidae, Peter Pankras is busy with developing new models. The Stinger for example will not be produced any longer. Therefore he's building a new website which should be launched soon.

The model which should replace the Stinger is previewed here on a Dutch forum. I believe the model is available as we speak, but the new site isn't up yet. Contact Peter Pankras by email if you like. His email is: corvidae (at) planet.nl



Does anyone has any ideas or tips about how to set up the steering for the elevator?
j0rrit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2006, 01:23 PM
  #4  
perttime
Senior Member
 
perttime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Tampere, FINLAND
Posts: 1,630
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Do you have to have everything hidden inside?

If not, just put one pushrod to one side of the elevator and join the elevator halves with music wire the old fashioned way. You can put a fairing over the pushrod.
perttime is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2006, 09:59 PM
  #5  
Rudeboy
 
Rudeboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Kortessem, BELGIUM
Posts: 3,508
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

You don't need a split pushrod, do you? All you have to do is cut a slot in the side of the fuse, so you can insert the complete elevator assembly (with its "horn"). Solder a "ball link" ball on the elevator horn.... that way you can just push on the plastic piece of the link, which is connected to your pushrod, onto that ball...
Rudeboy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2006, 06:34 AM
  #6  
j0rrit
Member
Thread Starter
 
j0rrit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Almere, NETHERLANDS
Posts: 56
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Yeah, that is possible indeed. But I'm not sure about cutting a slot in the side of the fuse. Do you have a picture for example maybe?

My idea was to build in all the complete elevator assembly as shown below. Is this going to work out well on a model which should exceed 300km/h or 180 MPH? Isn't it going to cause 'flutter' because of any slop that may occur?

j0rrit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2006, 08:18 AM
  #7  
Rudeboy
 
Rudeboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Kortessem, BELGIUM
Posts: 3,508
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

That would work, providing you use silver solder... don't use plain soft solder, because that is setting yourself up for a disaster.
But you would still end up cutting a slot in the fuse, wouldn't you? So you could just as well use a single pushrod...

Here are some pics... this is the elevator linkage on a Club 20 pylon plane. Works very well. The same type of elevator linkage is also used on bigger and faster pylon planes, so it is pretty much bullet proof. Just cover the slot with some tape when you go flying.
Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	Wu59458.jpg
Views:	35
Size:	40.9 KB
ID:	445632   Click image for larger version

Name:	Ie98103.jpg
Views:	24
Size:	33.9 KB
ID:	445633  
Rudeboy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2006, 10:29 AM
  #8  
Kmot
My Feedback: (24)
 
Kmot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Northridge, CA
Posts: 10,942
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Jorrit: This is a great thread! Thank you for sharing the wonderful pictures. You make building a model look like a science!
Kmot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2006, 05:09 PM
  #9  
j0rrit
Member
Thread Starter
 
j0rrit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Almere, NETHERLANDS
Posts: 56
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

I'm glad you enjoy the photos, makes it worthwhile to keep you posted.


@ Rudeboy,

Thanks for the photos! It makes it all clear to me. I'm changing my plans and use a single ball-link. Since I don't have much experience with silver soldering I'm going to ask some people at my club to help me. I will try to build in the assembly without cutting a gap in the fuse side, but I'm not sure if this will work out well. We'll see. I always could cut a gap afterwards if it isn't working without.
j0rrit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2006, 04:01 AM
  #10  
slowmo777
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Broichweiden, GERMANY
Posts: 69
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

ORIGINAL: j0rrit

... Is this going to work out well on a model which should exceed 300km/h or 180 MPH?...
Hello j0rrit,

that is a nice "mixed" speed plane. But do you think your speed claim (factoring out massive downwind) is realistic with your actual power/prop setup? You need considerable more rpm to achieve true 300 kph with this airframe. About 35 thousand static rpm with your prop choice would be minimum, alas being not possible with the Rossi 6T. On the other hand more than 7" of prop pitch will be difficult to use effectively with your airframe.

Happy Easter

slomo


slowmo777 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2006, 10:56 AM
  #11  
j0rrit
Member
Thread Starter
 
j0rrit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Almere, NETHERLANDS
Posts: 56
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Hey Slomo,

I'm not sure. Club20 is reaching speeds up to 200km/h (125 MPH) using side-exhaust engines which generate more drag. Therefore we use rear-exhaust engines to reduce the amount of possible drag. The Novarossi side-exhaust engines used for Club20 in the Netherlands have an output of 23000rpm. The wing we use is special designed to reduce drag and generate more speed. It doesn't meet the Club20 standards because of that. In the picture below you can see the difference. And since Club20 is reaching speeds of plus 200km/h (125 MPH), we could approach 300km/h (180 MPH) in my opinion. The Stiletto is clocked at speeds above the 300km/h (180 MPH) with a radar-gun, using the same setup as we're using.

If the models are finished we are planning to measure our speeds using the Doppler-effect.

j0rrit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2006, 12:57 PM
  #12  
slowmo777
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Broichweiden, GERMANY
Posts: 69
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Well, this would not be the first time watching too optimistic speed claims (often made by the manufacturer) in R/C speed dedicated forums. Some might lively do remember that Jetenspeedmodels Stinger .40 clocked at 380 kph with the Rossi R53 Fan engine (180mph in reality). Or all those 200 mph Diamond Dusts and Whiplashs…

With your current setup impressive 160 to 170 mph are possible (“true speed” resulting out of dives and from averaged down- and headwind passes over 150 meters horizontal distance). Anyway, if you happen to visit the German Speed Cup in Osnabrueck this year, you’ll know the truth.

Enjoy!

Slomo

P.S. It is the speed measurement within the 150 m horizontal flight path in both directions that enables real objective comparisons between the different speed plane types and their power setups respectively. Here the wheat separates from the chaff...
slowmo777 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2006, 01:20 PM
  #13  
j0rrit
Member
Thread Starter
 
j0rrit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Almere, NETHERLANDS
Posts: 56
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Yes, I know what you're meaning. We're hoping to achieve a speed that would come near to 180 MPH, but we're also very pleased with 170 or less. I don't think we will be present at the speedcup meeting in Germany this summer. User 'F3D' at RC-Network.de showed a impressive model which he's going to compete with at the Speedcup in OsnabrĂĽck. Picture
j0rrit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2006, 02:38 PM
  #14  
slowmo777
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Broichweiden, GERMANY
Posts: 69
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Well, shall I be honest?

During the next Speed Cup (which I strongly recommend to attend) you’ll recognize that about 80% of the participants competing in the class of 10 to 15 ccm will use this identical airframe – quite boring isn’t it?. So it’s kind of stupid to name their speed machines differently…

That airframe was developed 17 years ago by the German fellow Kaiser, a national F3D pylon champ, who was the first person breaking the 400 kph “barrier” within the objective 150 m speed trap of the German Speed Cup. His best speed was 406 kph in year 1990 (averaged speed to eliminate wind impact).

So these BVM driven airframes will most likely exceed this inofficial record speed since these engines do produce at least 30% more HP than the best available 10 cc speed engines. Because several BVM powered Kaiser models will compete each other, the right speed prop and the smoothness of the flying style will make the final winner.

BTW, I do develop my full composite speed planes myself (and will NOT sell one single airframe in order to avoid any commercial or non-commercial clones).

Nuff said. Good luck!

Slomo
slowmo777 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 10:00 AM
  #15  
j0rrit
Member
Thread Starter
 
j0rrit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Almere, NETHERLANDS
Posts: 56
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

This morning I went to the local DIY-shop to look for a burner and some silver-solder. The cheapest items that I found were pretty expensive. The burner costs €23,- and silver-solder was about €7,- (about $37 together). It’s a lot of money for one simple elevator assembly. So I went for plan B, and bought a tube of Bison Metal Epoxy. Maybe this will work out as well. It should be resistant to vibrations and could cope with a lot of stress. We'll see. I'll test it firmly before mounting it on the Stiletto, but I think the M2 thread is going to be the weak link... If it isn't quite meeting my expectations I will solder it though.

The ingredients:



First I'd make small cuts with a wire cutter to generate more grip. Then I'd grind all components and clean them with some thinner. Afterwards I'd add the Metal Epoxy onto the parts and wrapped steel wire around firmly to give it extra strength. After adding another coat of Metal Epoxy on the outside I was quite confident that this is going to work out, don't you think?



j0rrit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 11:02 AM
  #16  
daven
Senior Member
My Feedback: (1)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Waseca, MN
Posts: 8,455
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Nice looking planes, I like the "bling" effect.

You mentioned the Hitec 81 was smaller than the Hitec 85, are you sure? I thought it was the same case, just that the 85 has ball bearings. Personally I would be concerned with 81's on the ailerons, especially if you think this thing will break 170 mph.

Did you give any thought to using a single aileron servo in the center with torque rods too the ailerons?

Looks great so far.
daven is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 11:35 AM
  #17  
j0rrit
Member
Thread Starter
 
j0rrit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Almere, NETHERLANDS
Posts: 56
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Thanks!

The Hs81-MG has a smaller casing compared with the Hs85-MG. The Hs81 has double ball bearings and metal gears, but produces a lower torque at 4,8v. The output torque is 2,6kg, and the 85-MG delivers 3,0kg torque.

Hitec Hs81-MG specs:
* Speed 0.11sec/60° at 4.8 volt.
* Torque 2,6kg * cm at 4.8 volt.
* Weight 16,6 gram
* 29,8x12x29,6mm (Width: 12mm instead of 13mm)
* Metal gears


Hitec Hs85-MG specs:
* Speed 0.16 sec/60° at 4.8 volt.
* Torque 3 kg * cm at 4.8 volt.
* Weight 19 gram
* 29x13x30 mm
* Metal gears

It should be fine. It has been used very often in Stiletto's and all other speedmodels from Corvidae / Jet & Speedmodels.
j0rrit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 12:14 PM
  #18  
buzzingb
Senior Member
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Bruce, MS
Posts: 1,516
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

I don't think I would trust the metal epoxy. I would go with silver solder.
buzzingb is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 01:29 PM
  #19  
slowmo777
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Broichweiden, GERMANY
Posts: 69
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

ORIGINAL: buzzingb

I don't think I would trust the metal epoxy. I would go with silver solder.
Ditto. Silver solder is a must.

Also please switch to M2.5 or better M3 thread size.

slowmo777 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 04:37 PM
  #20  
Jagdgeschwader 26
My Feedback: (4)
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Paoli, PA
Posts: 60
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Just my two cents worth. Putting partial cuts in the surface of the elevator horn will induce stress risers which, under extreme vibration, will potentially end up with metal fatigue and a catastrophic failure. Don't do that!! Better to lightly sand the surface with fine (400 grit at most) wet-or-dry sandpaper. This will provide sufficient "tooth" on the surface for the epoxy to bond to. Better yet, use silver solder.

Regards, and good luck. Nice looking aircraft.

Revver #142
Jagdgeschwader 26 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2006, 09:35 PM
  #21  
Electric Delta
My Feedback: (13)
 
Electric Delta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Mebane, NC
Posts: 206
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Hi, I've also got a Stiletto, but have not started building yet. I was planning on installing an MVVS .21 or .28 (both available) rear-exhaust
with the Rossi .21-sized tuned pipe. Recently I picked up a Jett BSE .30 side-exhaust engine, and am toying with the idea of installing it instead
and using an APC Q40 carbon fiber prop. Anyone care to comment on whether this would be too heavy or too much power for the airframe,
or a bad match? I like the idea of the rear-exhaust and enclosed tuned pipe, but I just know the Jett .30 will outrun either of the MVVS's...
Electric Delta is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2006, 11:45 AM
  #22  
j0rrit
Member
Thread Starter
 
j0rrit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Almere, NETHERLANDS
Posts: 56
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

I'm also sure that the JETT will outrun both MVVS engines. Nevertheless I like the sleek and streamlined shape of a rear-exhaust engine. The airframe is definitely going to handle well with the stress and speeds, but you need to secure the firewall very good. Adding strings of carbon isn't a luxury I believe. You can develop your own cowl for the JETT cylinder head, which should fit nicely and reduces drag. They also use this sort of solutions for Club20 racing.

If you're going to build your Stiletto, please keep us updated. I'm curious about the performance of the JETT engine.
j0rrit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2006, 05:28 AM
  #23  
slowmo777
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Broichweiden, GERMANY
Posts: 69
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Hello j0rrit,

looking for the right prop setup:

Although the Stiletto fuse is quite bulky for a 6.5 diameter prop - better would be a diameter of 7" here - I would like to recommend an uncut Graupner Speed Propeller 6.5x6.5 for the Stiletto. If you manage to get a ground rpm of 29 K with that prop, you have a pretty good setting.

slomo

P.S. A venturi speed carb with a bore of 8 mm will be helpful.
slowmo777 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2006, 05:53 PM
  #24  
j0rrit
Member
Thread Starter
 
j0rrit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Almere, NETHERLANDS
Posts: 56
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

I'm going to look for some 6,5x6,5 Graupner props, but I like to compare some setups with each other. I hear Stiletto owners are quite satisfied with the performance of the 7*6w from APC. APC is still plastic, and with that amount of RPM's I like to go for carbon props. The Club20 guys here (same persons that make the MB40 engines) are making their own carbon props in moulds. When I meet them, I'll ask about the possibilities and measurements of the props. The carburetor is for the braking in of the engine, I will use a venturi while flying eventually.

The TruTurn spinners arrived today! They ended up quite expensive. Dutch customs added an extra fee of €20 euros to the whole package. I think they cost about €50,- euros per spinner right now. [] And they don't even fit! The crankshaft thread of the Rossi is 6.15mm (almost 1/4" ), and the TruTurn hubs have metric M6 thread which is causing problems. It is impossible to screw it together, so the spinner isn't going to fit. Even the aluminum bushing that came with the spinner is perfectly 6.0mm, so that is also a problem because it doesn't slide over the crankshaft threads. Maybe it's possible to modify the bushing untill it fits, but that doesn't solve the adapter-problem.

Maybe it's possible to get an unprocessed adapter from TruTurn and send them over to Rossi, so they can custom drill and tap the right thread?

Hits and tips are very welcome right now.

j0rrit is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2006, 07:31 PM
  #25  
Electric Delta
My Feedback: (13)
 
Electric Delta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Mebane, NC
Posts: 206
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default RE: Stiletto from Corvidae.net

Hi J0rrit,

I believe the newer 3.5cc AXE Rossi's and Novarossi's have a 1/4"x28 threaded crankshaft, while the older 3.5cc Rossi's have
a 6mm x 1.0mm thread (M6). Even though 6.15mm seems too small a diameter to be 1/4" (1/4" = 6.35 mm), you may have
1/4"x28. The '28' is the number of threads per inch. A 1/4"x28 has a finer pitch thread than 6mmx1mm. The 28 threads per
inch corresponds to a pitch of 0.907 mm, which you can check with a caliper, or even check it is finer by just holding your
crankshaft against a known M6 screw. I can't believe Rossi would put a unique exotic thread on their crankshaft, it is almost
surely 1/4"x28. TruTurn also makes adapters for 1/4"x28 and a matching turned bushing for the spinner backplate is included
in the adapter kits, so there should be no need to customize an adapter yourself. 1/4x28 is very common here in the USA for
most engines from .21 cu. in. (3.5cc) through .50 cu. in. (8.3cc), and the adapters are also easy to get. If you have real trouble
to get them in Belgium, send me a PM; the adapters are small enough to put in a padded envelope and send with regular mail.
Just check / verify if the pitch of the crankshaft thread is indeed 0.907 mm, then you will know what thread adapter you need
for sure. Also measure the crankshaft diameter, as some engines have a larger diameter crankshaft stud at the drive washer
that then "steps down" to the thread size. TruTurn makes the right bushing for your engine too!

Electric Delta is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service