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motor offset glow vs electric

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Old 07-02-2011, 03:42 PM
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scorchy72
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Default motor offset glow vs electric

I have recently completed a kit Pete 'N Poke sport 40. I'm using an electric motor although it was originally designed for a glow engine. The plans call for a 3 degree glow motor offset.

I set the electric with a 3 degree offset. During initial flights, the plane is hard to turn right and wants to slide if no rudder is used. It turns left just fine.

My Question; Do I really need to set the electric motor with a 3 degree offset?
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Old 07-02-2011, 04:26 PM
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Default RE: motor offset glow vs electric

If it turns left better than right, I believe you might need a little more right thrust to counteract it.
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Old 07-04-2011, 06:24 PM
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cfircav8r
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Default RE: motor offset glow vs electric

The right thrust is there to offset some of the torque effects. Going to electric will not noticably reduce or enhance these unless you significantly change propeller size and/or rpm. The more likely problem is your trim setup and the characteristics of the A/C. If you are throttled back some and flying lower speeds you will have a greater left turning tendancy and this will manefest as a slip when turning right and a more natural turn to the left. WWI A/C are very prone to this and need to be flown with rudder, and the Pete 'N Poke has similar qualities. More right rudder than left during turns and a significant amount on climb out. Are you running a larger prop diameter and/or are you operating at a higher AOA due to a lower power output? This will aggravate the problem. Down thrust can also help with the left turning tendancy as it will reduce the P-factor and have the added benefit of reducing the ballooning effect when applying power. As far as trim if you are using rudder to compensate for a roll or aileron to compensate for a yaw problem you can have some very bad turning tendancies. Check your trim first then if you still have trouble try about 3 degrees of down thrust. If it creates more trouble or just doesn't help at all take it back out and try a little more right thrust. 5 degrees is not unheard of, just not as common.
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