Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Results 1 to 8 of 8

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, HI
    Posts
    569
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    FOX motors any good?

    I just got a box full of brand new Fox motors (.25 to .60). I am not sure what I will do with all these motors (I have not counted, but probably a dozen of them).
    I have no box or instruction, but they are NEW.
    Are those any good???
    Herve Lejeune
    PAU
    Performance Aircraft Unlimited

  2. #2
    Hobbsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Colonial Beach, VA
    Posts
    15,571
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: FOX motors any good?

    They are very good, break them in on 5% nitro/20% castor lube, use a regular ole Fox idlebar plug, are you equipped to show us some pics? Check the .60 and whether ABC or ringed, and if there is a .46 it will be ABC it makes a difference how you break it in.
    John Deere 820, 72.82 HP @ 1,125 rpm, 470.7 cu. in., bore=6.125", stroke=8.00", two cylinder. CR=16 to 1.
    Starter=V-4 pony motor.

    Club Saito member #5

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, HI
    Posts
    569
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: FOX motors any good?

    Here is what I have:

    1- .60 Ringed
    1- .50 Ringed
    6- .40 Non-Ringed
    2- Non marked, but they look like .25

    They all have air bleed type carbs, except for the 2 small ones (.25?)
    Herve Lejeune
    PAU
    Performance Aircraft Unlimited

  4. #4
    Ed_Moorman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Shalimar, FL
    Posts
    4,052
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: FOX motors any good?

    I ran Foxes for several years. The .50 is a good engine. The sleeve is fairly thin so it needs to be broken in slowly and on a castor fuel. Most Fox engines lean out a good bit in the air so they need to be set on the rich side for take off. Most were also high compression and did not perform well on fuel much higher than 5% nitro.

    The air bleed looking carb is sort of a hybrid. It does meter the fuel, but uses the air bleed to trim the idle mixture. Most simple air bleeds do not meter the fuel.

    Here's a link to some real Fox people.

    Flight Line
    Ed Moorman, AMA 553, Former R/C Report Fun Aerobatics Columnist. 76 and up to my old tricks!

  5. #5
    mikefuture's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    mineola, NY
    Posts
    99
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: FOX motors any good?

    islandflyer,

    Foxes are horrible engines. They are so bad that I think you should get rid of them by boxing them up and send them to me

    Enjoy your new engines and have fun with them!

  6. #6
    RaceCity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    NotUpNorth
    Posts
    1,839
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: FOX motors any good?

    Mike,

    The .15BB, .25BB, and .40 Lapped piston motors are very dangerous. I have the proper equipment
    to safely discard of these motors.

    I think it would be best for all if the aforementioned motors were sent to me. NIB preferred.

    <GGGGG>

    'Race
    AMA 63990

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Nacogdoches, TX
    Posts
    17
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: FOX motors any good?

    Boy what characters we have!

    The real answer on whether Fox engines are good or not is: It depends on the engine.

    The current lineup of Fox engines are good, but there were some rough times along the way. Since your engines have the EZ carbs, they are pretty new. They should all run fine with one possible problem.

    If the 40 size engines are ball bearing models, you may have trouble getting them to idle. Fox added a slot between the bottom of the carb and the front bearing around the same time they went to the EZ carb. The idea here was the low pressure area at the base of the carb would pull any fuel that got to the front bearing back in instead of it blowing out the front bearing (some people really don't like fuel coming out the front of their engines - pretty silly to me). What Fox actually did was machine in an air leak into the base of the carb. The engine will pull enough air through this slot that it will not draw fuel at idle. The one engine like this I have experiance with was so bad you had to hold the fuel tank 6" above the engine to keep it running at idle (with the idle screw all the way in). It just didn't have any fuel draw at low speed. I believe the Flite Line Solutions site has a fix for this problem.

    There are several other things that should be pointed out.

    1. Fox engines are LOUD!
    2. Fox engines need castor oil. Do not run a fuel that has all synthetic oil. Even with regular Powermaster fuel (18% oil, 1/3 castor - 2/3 synthetic) you need to add a couple of ounces of castor oil per gallon. These engines seem to really like Sig fuels. They also run well on the Powermaster GMA signiture blend fuels with 22% oil content (1/2 castor, 1/2 synthetic).
    3. Fox engine require a lot longer breakin period than most modern engines. Those 40s in particular will require at least 2 gallons of fuel run through before they really settle in. It is a good idea to put these engines on a plane that flies well, tune them real rich, and fly, fly, fly. Flying should be done at full throttle and the engine should absolutely gurgle (very rich). Of course, this flying should be done after several short, rich runs on the ground.

    The real plus side on the 40s are that they just don't wear out. I've never seen one that was run properly with the correct fuel wear out. They last forever.

    OH YEAH! The above breakin is assuming these are Fox 40BB standards, not Deluxe. The Deluxe is an ABC engine and none of the above breakin would apply. As far as I know, the only ways to tell the standard and Deluxe apart is by the color of the sleeve. If you look through the exhaust port and the outside of the cylinder looks gray, it should be a standard. If the outside of the cylinder looks gold colored, it is a Deluxe. Another way would be to remove the glow plug. If it is a standard, the engine should turn over easily. If it is the Deluxe, it should get very tight as the piston approaches the top of the cylinder.

    Hope all this helps.
    Ken

    They really are junk and you should send them to me, not mikefuture or racecity! :-)

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Port Ewen, NY
    Posts
    3,398
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: FOX motors any good?

    Ken,

    I agree with everything except item 3. I assume by "modern" engines you are referring to ABC (or equivalent). Any iron/steel engine should be broken-in on a bench. The break-in should consist of a series of two to three minute runs with adequate cool-down time between runs. Starting rich and leaning a few clicks every other run until you reach peak. This is called heat-cycling.
    Although you can break them in your way, it is much faster to break them in on a bench. One ten to fifteen minute run is one heat cycle...and one flight with a mis-adjusted engine.
    Still, it is your engine, your choice. This is just MY opinion.

    George


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:07 PM.

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.