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Thread: Gyspy Moth?


  1. #1

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    Gyspy Moth?

    Hello Folks,
    Can amyone here tell me the differances of a tiger moth and a gypsy moth I bought a large biplane at Joe Nall and thought it was a Tiger Moth. It even had a Tiger on the tail but , the owner of the Plane said NO! it was a Gyspy Moth. He built it he should know. I have looked on the net and I can't finf the right info.
    For any help I would be thankful
    Waditup




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    RE: Gyspy Moth?

    Here you go:

    In the 1920's, the de Havilland Aircraft Works developed a line of light aircraft, intended to be affordable and easy to fly for the average man. They were called Moths, in recognition of Geoffrey de Havilland's renown as a lepidopterist. The first model, introduced in 1925 became the D.H. 60 Cirrus Moth. It was a simple yet strong spruce and plywood box section design, powered by a four cylinder 60 horsepower engine.

    In 1927, a variant was introduced with a new, improved inline inverted four cylinder engine. This became the famous GYPSY MOTH. It proved powerful and reliable, and many light plane records were broken all over the world. Not only did it advance the cause of civil aviation, but it was seen to be an ideal training aircraft as well. The Royal Air Force had been using this type for elementary instruction for several years when the Air Ministry issued specifications calling for an improved version. D.H. 60 fuselages were used, but the wing centre sections were moved forward while the outer sections were moved back. This distinctive swept wing configuration kept the centre of gravity constant with the changes that were necessary. Thus was born the D.H. 82 TIGER MOTH.

    For 15 years this became the foremost primary trainer throughout the commonwealth and elsewhere. It was the dominant type used in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan and thousands of military pilots got their first taste of flight in this robust little machine.

    Altogether, over 9000 of these aircraft were made, 1,784 D.H.82C's being built by De Havilland Canada under license. The Canadian models featured a tail wheel, a stronger undercarriage with wheels set farther forward and a sliding canopy for protection from the elements.

    Jamesf

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    RE: Gyspy Moth?

    Hi wad1;

    Greetings from the very warm 'Valley of the Sun'.

    I agree fully with the answer given previously by Mr Fuller. I recently acquired a large DH ? Moth kit, that had been repacked in a decrepit generic cardboard box, no ID whatsover, the plans looked very British, beautifully done, with a 67 1/2 " ws, and it had swept back wings both top and bottom, and an inverted engine mounting, [prop/spinner at top of cowl. Plans also included scale type floats and enclosed full canopy details. So I started doing some research, simply googling DH Moth types.....loads and loads of data: Gypsy Moths had straight wings, Tiger Moths had the center section with tank moved forward to ease entry into front cockpit, as the Tiger Moth became a Brit. Military trainer aircraft; anyways the outer wing panels were swept back 10 degrees to maintain the old CG. That is about all I can add; there were uprite, and inverted engines variants, including one with a 5 cylinder radial called the Genet Moth, but I don't know if it was a variant of the Gypsy or Tiger. Also found out, though not conclusively that my kit may have been designed by the great British RC modeller, David Boddington, still doing more research.

    Hoping this was helpful to you, will close for now, best regards from Glendale, Arizona,

    Joe Nagy.

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    RE: Gyspy Moth?

    For the airplane spotters out there, Gypsy Moths had straight wings and an upright 4 pot DH (Cirrus?) engine, Tigers had the swept wings and the inverted engine. If you get close to a Gypsy you will see that they also had a long exhaust pipe on the r/h side. Genet moths were different again, but had straight wings.
    Evan, WB #12.

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    RE: Gyspy Moth?

    Look here for 3-views of various Moth types (DeHavilland DH-...), including the original (DH-60) and two Tigers (DH-71 and DH-82).

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    RE: Gyspy Moth?

    Wow,
    That was great.My plane has stright wings for sure.That question has been put to rest.
    Thanks Fellers
    Waditup


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    RE: Gyspy Moth?


    ORIGINAL: UStik

    Look here for 3-views of various Moth types (DeHavilland DH-...), including the original (DH-60) and two Tigers (DH-71 and DH-82).
    This thread has been an education to me and encouraged me to look for a Cirrus Moth and among
    the results found this.

    http://www.dbsportandscale.com/cirrus-moth-quarter.htm

    Note difference in cowl for smaller cirrus engine.

    Thanks for all the info guys, would almost make a scale modeller out of a chap.

    john

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    RE: Gyspy Moth?

    The Tiger Moth also has more dihedral in the lower wing. When the wings were swept the lower wingtips became dangerously close to the ground in the three point attitude. It was impossible to land or even taxi without touching the tips.

    The fix was to shorten the interplane struts (purportedly by sir Geoffrey with an axe, time was short and they were in the middle of RAF trials). Viola extra lower wing dihedral and wing tip clearance.

    The result of all the mods (centre section forward, increased sweep and dihedral) was an aircraft that was not nearly as nice to fly as the Dh 60, but as is often the case in aviation the compromise worked.

    Dave H
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood #89

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    RE: Gyspy Moth?

    Waditup,

    Does the Tiger on the tail of your model have moth wings? It may be the emblem of the Tiger Club.

    There is at least one Dh 60 in the Tiger Club I believe.

    Dave H
    Ultra Sport Brotherhood #89


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