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Babcock Xmitter and Rcvr Info Requested

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Old 12-20-2004, 11:00 AM
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2d4gh7
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Default Babcock Xmitter and Rcvr Info Requested

I recently came upon a Babcock rcvr and transmitter. Look like they're in good shape. Can't find much information on this equipment. I've got a message into the RC Newsgroup and hope I might get some help there. Anyway, can anyone give me a link to someone that collects this stuff. I'd like to know more about it

Regards
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Old 12-20-2004, 12:34 PM
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Mike Denest
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Default RE: Babcock Xmitter and Rcvr Info Requested

You might also try the Vintage R/C Society discussion list on Yahoo.
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Old 12-20-2004, 01:38 PM
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Default RE: Babcock Xmitter and Rcvr Info Requested

It's the original all hard tube set with the closed relay. This was the first really reliable single channel commercial TX/Receiver combo in general distribution. It's heavy and requires a low voltage source for the tube filament's, a high voltage source for the plates and a small battery to bias the tubes to cut-off.

I do not know if batteries required this receiver are still available.

I think the transmitter used a length of music wire for an antenna.

Installation of this receiver is tricky. It was suspended by rubber bands in the cabin for vibration isolation AND because of susceptibility to electrical noise all the metal parts of the model must be grounded to a bare wire bus which is attached to the systems electrical ground.

Richard Smith
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Old 12-21-2004, 12:04 AM
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Default RE: Babcock Xmitter and Rcvr Info Requested

You are correct Richard, Your memory is pretty good. The BCT 2 tx. used a 36 inch length of music wire as an antenna.
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Old 12-26-2004, 11:32 AM
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Default RE: Babcock Xmitter and Rcvr Info Requested

Hey, great to see so many people with their long term memory still intact! I still have my original unit which is identical to yours. Yes, it did use a 36 inch music wire as antenna. You also had to tune the transmitter by acquiring the correct tone on a pair of earphones. Bunch of batteries which weighed a ton. You also needed the infamous rubber band powered escapements (as opposed to our modern proportional servos!) The best on the market was the Babcock MK II "Super Compound." This meant you got right/left rudder and up elevator.) If you wanted more than one control, you had to "cascade" escapements, that way you could get throttle control (high/low) down elevator, etc. Of course, control was non-proportional AND sequential! If you wanted "right" again, you had to go first left, then up, then throttle! There were some real "artists" out there who could make these things actually fly pretty smoothly! Real pioneers. My brother and I never were so lucky. We would heave our "two-ton" Berkeley J-3 into the air with the little McCoy .29 screaming to beat the band and then have to chase it waving our transmitter all over the place to get a control signal. Most turns lost altitude and sometimes (most times!) the plane would just land with the engine still screaming. Wow! What a sense of accomplishment! The most fun I ever had on a flying field!
You also have to remember that these radios were "Super-Regens" as opposed to modern "Super-Hets" (Ok, how many of you out there remember those terms!?) and all ran on 26.995 MHZ. This meant they "splattered" their signals all over the 25mhz band. (except, of course, in the direction of YOUR receiver!) Only ONE plane up at a time. Fortunately, CB's didn't really create a problem then - don't even remember if they existed in the 50's. Btw, Although I don't have the original boxes for mine, I still have the original instruction booklet plus a Babcock MK II escapement, a Bonner escapement and a second small Bonner motor escapement. Also a small solid state Citizenship receiver (Super-Regen) which finally allowed us to fly reliably, even with escapements. (A lot less batteries!) Finally, a Canadian outfit still sells tubes for this radio. (They are standard units.) Remember that "Rock" concert AMPs use tubes because they can handle higher power; so they are still manufactured overseas. I had to replace one about 4 years ago when it broke during a move. ( I still like to look at it and know that it still "works.") Regards - AL
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