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  1. #1

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    wanting to start questions

    Hello


    I am thinking about going out for IMAC next season , I have't decided on a airplane to use I currently have a few airplanes and i would consider myself a alright pilot ,


    What platforum to start out with ? is my real question I'm guessing 50cc airplane ? I don't have a hudge budge or space ( no trailer and i have a hatch back car ) I'm looking just to fly the begginer I don't know all the rules but I'v been told a large veritity of aircraft can be used in begginer and I was told this while flying my 3DHS 65 vyper . the person said I could even fly that plane and compeat with it but its electirc not sure how that would work i noticed nosie is a score factor this airplane isnt vary loud besides the APC prop


    What airplanes would would you start out personly ?

    thanks for reading my post


  2. #2
    bubbagates's Avatar
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    RE: wanting to start questions

    I actually started with a Cap232 from Great planes. However, in Basic, you can fly whatever you like, once you get above Basic then the plane must resemble one that is capable of flying in an Aerobatic box. Extra's, Yak and some Edges are the most popular

    I've seen good pilots fly a 90 size electric and beat the pants off of guys flying 40 percent planes. I've seen a Goldberg Sukhoi kick all of the pilots in basic on a very windy day and he was flying a 90 sized Saito

    I would highly suggest you head over to the IMAC website at http://www.mini-iac.com and ask question over there, you will get much more help

    As a mutli time judge of all the NE regions contests plus a few times at the Nationals, here are a few things to be aware of.

    Just because it is windy, that does not mean the contest will be called off, I've flown in winds as high as 25mph with gust into the 30's

    1) flying a perfectly wind corrected line both horizontal and vertical, wings level at all times (huge point deductions come from this all the time)
    2) Can you present the correct maneuver in the most logical place for judging (known as Airspace control Score)
    3) Are you really familiar with trimming your plane BEYOND using the trim tabs (engine thrust angles, throws, etc. which takes a load of work off you as the pilot but not required per the rules)
    4) Do you know exactly what the judges are expecting to see and where the deductions will come from.

    While I may sound condescending, I really am not trying to be, as an experienced judge and a pilot who flies IMAC regularly and a person that teaches IMAC, you would be surprised how many times someone says they know all the rules and then get discouraged when they go to their first contest and get very low scores. I typically hold what we call in the NorthEast region an IMAC Primer. That is I/we come to your location and spend the day going over the rules in detail, then we take your plane, fly it, get it properly trimmed and fly it again, then we run through the Basic sequence and you get to fly it as well as judge it. Most times, I am asked to stay for the weekend for some extra work.

    In FL, that is known as the SouthEast Region, contact Curtis Couzier (you can find is contact info on the IAMC website under the SouthEast region, he can hook you up with someone close to you that flies IMAC and is willing to watch you and help you.

    Also, one unwritten requirement is you go have fun, it can be really boring while waiting for your time to fly but you can always help out doing the many other things going on. The IMAC folks are a great bunch and always willing to lend a hand. I've seen planes go down during events a practice and seen pilots offer their planes so that person can compete. I've seen equipment failures where another pilot has the same plane and saw them swap the elevators between the planes (happened at the 2009 NATS in the UNlimited class), not tot mention the after hours fun
    Bill James

    IMAC NorthEast Regional Director
    2009-2010
    2013-2014

  3. #3
    Eganwp's Avatar
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    RE: wanting to start questions

    ORIGINAL: zacharyR

    Hello


    I am thinking about going out for IMAC next season , I have't decided on a airplane to use I currently have a few airplanes and i would consider myself a alright pilot ,


    What platforum to start out with ? is my real question I'm guessing 50cc airplane ? I don't have a hudge budge or space ( no trailer and i have a hatch back car ) I'm looking just to fly the begginer I don't know all the rules but I'v been told a large veritity of aircraft can be used in begginer and I was told this while flying my 3DHS 65 vyper . the person said I could even fly that plane and compeat with it but its electirc not sure how that would work i noticed nosie is a score factor this airplane isnt vary loud besides the APC prop


    What airplanes would would you start out personly ?

    thanks for reading my post


    Hey Zachary!

    Welcome to IMAC! I'm actually quite new as well. I flew my first 2 contests last year and had an absolute blast with my 30% 50cc Edge (in my profile pic). You're really going to love it. I highly encourage you to try it. Everyone that I know of who's tried it, absolutely loves it.

    Your Viper is a perfect Basic class contender! It has a nice swept back wing that will perform well. Basic class has a big advantage in that you could fly a pattern plane in it and beat any 44% gasser on the field. But as stated, you must fly a scale IMAA legal plane in the other classes. Basic manouvers aren't too difficult, but of course are hard to do WELL. You'll be competitive with any plane that you're comfortable with, and is properly trimmed. Of course the bigger planes fly smoother, but if it's your first year, just fly what you have to try it out. As a bonus, at your first event you'll be able to see a pile of giants that will help you pick your first 50-100cc gasser.

    Take time to really setup your radio, mixes and throws properly. 20* aileron, 10* elev, 25* rudder are a good start for low rates. Add 10* to each if you think you'll use high rates for something (likely nothing in basic other than the hammerhead and possibly stall turn depending on plane). You don't get into snaps and rollers until sportsman.

    Setup your radio for a 2-3% (plane dependant) down elevator downline mix to keep that plane really flying straight on downlines. Use a trimming guide and work on taking off the pilot load, and letting your plane fly itself as much as possible.


    As far as your sound question, it is solely based on being QUIET. The quieter you are, the higher your score. So for your electric you'll score 8-10's most likely, depending on your judges, throttle control and apc prop noise. The reason for this category is to keep the loud gassers under control on db's. Some of the 222's on stock pipes with a huge thick prop at WOT will honestly make your ears hurt when it rips. :P There's a reason you see a lot of 3 blade props and cannisters on the gassers.


    Anyway, we could talk all night, but just dive in with both feet and start practicing on the sim. The 2011 basic sequence is actually easier than last year as there pull-pull humpty bump has the half roll on the downline this year, not on the upline (throwing off your line without opposite rudder input).

    Enjoy it! Please ask if you have questions. Also read through the judging guide or take a class to learn more about each manouver. And remember this: get a caller or spectator to really critique you when you practice. By the end of the summer you should basically want to punch your caller with how much they've critiqued you!... But remember this, the harder they critique you the better you'll become. The more picky you are with your flying, the higher you'll score and the more fun you'll have. For now, just try and it out and practice the sequence after trimming your plane. The critiquing and working on each manouver will come with practice.

    Egan
    35% H9 Extra 300 - DLE-111 | 33% Lanier Yak 54 - DL-100 | 30% Peak Edge 540T - DLE-55 | SkyWalker Long Range FPV

  4. #4

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    RE: wanting to start questions

    I second all that others have responded with. I flew my first contest over this past weekend and had a lot of fun. I went in with no expectations and viewed it as a learning experience. I went by myself and had no problem finding experienced pilots to call for me and offer lots of pointers/tips. Met some really nice folks and learned a lot. One thing I did find though is that some members of my club compliment me on my flying and I thought I was a pretty smooth flier. I found I wasn't as smooth as I thought. I'm not saying this to discourage you, just saying that IMAC is a fantastic tool to improve on what you have. I walked away with a multitude of useful information to expand on after just one contest.

    As a side note, second place went to a small electric Extra that was probably around a 60 inch wing. So to answer your question, electrics are no problem in basic. Do it...you won't regret it.

  5. #5
    bubbagates's Avatar
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    RE: wanting to start questions


    ORIGINAL: wannabflyboy

    I second all that others have responded with. I flew my first contest over this past weekend and had a lot of fun. I went in with no expectations and viewed it as a learning experience. I went by myself and had no problem finding experienced pilots to call for me and offer lots of pointers/tips. Met some really nice folks and learned a lot. One thing I did find though is that some members of my club compliment me on my flying and I thought I was a pretty smooth flier. I found I wasn't as smooth as I thought. I'm not saying this to discourage you, just saying that IMAC is a fantastic tool to improve on what you have. I walked away with a multitude of useful information to expand on after just one contest.

    As a side note, second place went to a small electric Extra that was probably around a 60 inch wing. So to answer your question, electrics are no problem in basic. Do it...you won't regret it.
    Sounds like you are referring to the CAPI contest, wasn't there two of the same plane in electric flying basic. I could not stay for Sunday but Saturday was a total blast

    I agree, if you come away from your first contest learning to fly even better then you gained a whole lot plus you can easily make some great friends while scheming on how to sabotage their plane so you can beat them, OPPSSS I didn't say that

    The camaraderie is like no other I have ever seen. A lot of completive sports and hobbies are every person for themselves, not IMAC. I have been on both sides, give my plane to a competitor so that he could compete and have had hardware handed to me to fix an issue and not once have I ever asked or been asked to give anything for it

    Like everything, IMAC is not perfect, judging is hard work and always a topic of contention but pin all my time flying IMAC, it just keeps getting better, one baby step at a time
    Bill James

    IMAC NorthEast Regional Director
    2009-2010
    2013-2014

  6. #6

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    RE: wanting to start questions

    Yep, that was CAPI I was talking about. And you're right, there were two of that exact same plane competing in basic. I can't remember they guy's name that took second but he's a real nice guy. We talked for a bit during and after it was over.

    I made some really dumb mistakes but learned a lot from them. For one thing I didn't even know the names of most of the maneuvers and only had the sequence halfway memorized by the second day. I got zeroed out more than once for doing the wrong maneuver at the wrong time and had trouble with the spins. Not to mention getting nervous when it was my turn to fly. It's hard to be smooth when my thumbs are shaking.

    All in all it was a blast though. Like I said I went in with no expectations so there were no disappointments. Can't wait to get out and practice for the next one.


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