Register

If this is your first visit, please click the Sign Up now button to begin the process of creating your account so you can begin posting on our forums! The Sign Up process will only take up about a minute of two of your time.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 42

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Elizabethtown, PA
    Posts
    68
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    2009 Basic Narrative

    Here it is, if you find anything wrong, please let me know and I'll correct it. Please remember that this is in no way replaces the need to learn Aresti.

    I have pulled the NOTES section. It has started a small war in here and via my email so this will be the last time I do something like this

    2009 Basic Sequence Narrative

    Figure 1 – 45 Degree upline. Just before you get to center, pull up to a 45-degree line. Hold this line for a long enough distance to set yourself up for the next maneuver and then push to exit upright and level. You want to try to exit this maneuver at center. The next maneuver requires one half of a loop coming down so you will need some altitude. Also remember that a 45-degree line is actually quite steep. Your caller can help by using the Aresti and using the 45-degree line against the horizon. A 45-degree line at the ends will look very different from the center so be aware of that

    Figure 2 – Split β€œS”. This is an end maneuver. Coming from the previous maneuver you will be flying from roughly the center to the start of this maneuver near the end of your airspace. Begin by executing Β½ roll to inverted and wings level, then executing an immediate pull to a one half loop. There should be no discernable line between the Β½ roll and pull. Though not really necessary, the key here is to exit right at the same altitude that you started the 45-degree upline. This will help with your overall ACS score.

    Figure 3 – Hammerhead. Begin this figure by applying full throttle and executing a gentle pull to a vertical upline. Use the rudder to keep the plane tracking straight up. Once you have reached sufficient altitude, begin to decrease the power. Leave 3 or 4 clicks of power on, and just before the plane stops moving, apply full rudder and come back to idle. It is almost always easiest to hammer INTO the wind if there is a crosswind. If the wind is down the runway, hammering either left or right is OK. Once the plane starts to pivot, the throttle can be reduced to idle. One method of preventing the plane from wagging its tail after the pivot is to keep some rudder input after the pivot and slowly take it out as the plane goes down. Though a bit harder to do, another method is to come out of the rudder just as the nose starts to pivot downwards. Also do not let the wings come off level. If you plane is trimmed well and the radio mixes are proper, this is not likely to happen as your mixes will take care of it but at the same time certain mixes can create this problem, it all depends on what aileron you had to mix in with the rudder. Almost all planes need some kind of rudder/ aileron mix. At the bottom of the line, execute a gentle pull to a horizontal exit and increase the throttle. Try to make the entry radius and exit radius equal don’t execute a sharp pull at the bottom. You should now be flying back to the center.

    Figure 4 – One Full Roll. Just before you get to center, start an aileron roll. You will not be judged on the rate of the roll – it can be as fast or as slow as you like. Typically, the faster you roll, the harder it is to stop it with the wings level. Give a little down elevator while you are inverted so that you don’t lose altitude, and stop the roll with your wings level. For the best score do not let the nose come off the line at any time during the roll (pitch or yaw), keep the roll rate exactly the same all the way through the maneuver and stop with the wings level.

    Figure 5 - Teardrop. As you get to the end, pull a gentle radius to a 45-degree upline. Fly this line a short distance and pull a 5/8th loop to a vertical downline. Execute a Β½ roll on that downline. Remember that roll must be centered on the line between the point where the downline is established and your pull out to level flight. The loop can be as tight or as open as you want. If you find you are in too close, make the partial loop nice and tight and of you are out too far, make it nice and big to help get yourself back in. Remember that for the best scores, keep the loop constant no matter how big or little, keep the roll rate constant and make sure you do a 45-degree line (remember it’s going to look a little different since you are on the end) and the downline is truly vertical using the rudder and elevator. Now fly towards the center for the next maneuver.

    Figure 6 - Loop. This figure looks easy and is probably the first aerobatic maneuver you flew when learning to fly. It is, however, extremely difficult to fly well. Just before center, begin by increasing the throttle to full power, and start a gentle pull. The size of the loop is not judged, but the bigger the loop, the harder it is to make perfect. Keep the radius consistent using the elevator and wind correct with rudder if necessary as you execute the first half of the loop. As you come over the top, you may need to keep a fair amount of power as this portion will be flown into the wind. You may even need to apply some down elevator across the top of the loop to keep it round. As the plane starts down the backside of the loop, decrease power smoothly to idle and use the elevator to keep the radius consistent. Finally, increase the power as you come back to horizontal flight. The loop should start and stop in the exact same place at the same altitude for the best possible score which will help ensure that it was round and not some other shape. You will quite often see judges take a pen or a finger and place it right on the point where the airplane started the first pull. This lets them see where the plane should end up at. Be sure when using the elevator, not to β€œShow” the judges any type of flat spot in the loops radius. Each discernable flat spot is one full point off your score.

    Figure 7 - Sharks Tooth. Fly towards the end of the field, and increase power to full throttle. Execute a gentle pull to a vertical upline. As before, use the rudder to maintain a nice vertical track. Execute a gentle pull across the top of the figure to an inverted 45-degree downline coming back towards yourself and decrease the power to idle or close to idle. Hold down elevator to maintain a nice line (not too shallow!) and then complete a half roll to upright. Hold this line and then execute a gentle pull back to horizontal flight and increase the throttle. You will now be flying to the other end before starting the next maneuver so be sure to keep this line level in all respects as it can be quite long.

    Figure 8 - Half Reverse Half Cuban 8. Just before getting to the end, begin by increasing the throttle to full power and execute a pull to a 45-degree upline. On the upline, execute a 1/2 roll to inverted, now flying the same distance as you did before the 1/2 roll pull 5/8th loop to level flight. In this maneuver be sure to center the 1/2 roll on the 45-degree line and be sure that the 45-degree line is actually 45 degrees, remember, you are now at the end so it will look different than in the center. As with the other loop elements, be sure to keep the radius smooth and the same all the way through.

    Figure 9 - Vertical line with a Β½ roll This is another end maneuver so after you complete the previous maneuver fly all the way down to the other end keeping the line level in all respects. You also need to be plenty high for the final maneuver as a two turn spin will eat up a lot of airspace coming down. Don’t forget to center the Β½ roll on the vertical line. Pull 90 degrees to vertical, fly a given distance and perform a Β½ roll, fly the exact same distance as you did before you preformed the Β½ roll and push to level.

    Figure 10 – Two turn positive spin. This maneuver is best viewed and judged at center. You are trying to time the stall to be right in front of where you are standing as this will help you and the judges see the stall and give you the best score. Most people zero this maneuver right here as the plane must stall and the way to tell is the nose and one wing will drop.

    As you approach the center of the field at a high altitude, begin to reduce the throttle smoothly. As the plane slows, you will have to feed in up elevator to keep it from descending. This will gradually bring the nose up. Once the throttle has reached idle, keep feeding in up elevator until the nose drops in a stall. You will also have to be keeping the line straight with rudder – particularly if there is any crosswind and your airspeed decreases. Don’t worry if the nose of the plane is cocked 45 degrees before the stall – it is most important to keep the line straight! As the nose drops, feed in rudder in the same direction as the wing that is falling right rudder if the right wing is falling and left rudder if the left wing is falling. Once the spin begins, go to full rudder and full aileron in the same direction (you should already be at full up elevator). After 2 turns, neutralize all controls to stop the spin. If the nose is high, give down elevator to establish a vertical downline. After the downline has been established, execute a gentle pull to horizontal flight and increase the throttle.


  2. #2
    Grelker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Posts
    297
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    I can read AResti, but I can't always remember the names of the manuevers. So if someone says do a split s, i have no idea what that is, but i can read the aresti for it and do the manuever. that's what happens when you get over 50
    Jon N.

  3. #3
    Grelker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Posts
    297
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    BTW, i really appreciate the hints on how to make the moves look good for scoring. thanks
    Jon N.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Elizabethtown, PA
    Posts
    68
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative


    ORIGINAL: Grelker
    that's what happens when you get over 50
    I resemble that remark

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Elizabethtown, PA
    Posts
    68
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative


    ORIGINAL: Grelker

    BTW, i really appreciate the hints on how to make the moves look good for scoring. thanks
    Np problem. I spend lots of time in the judges chair so I have a fair bit of experience and have been taught judging by some really knowledgeable Unlimited pilots and long time judging instructors (Kent Porter, Ty Lyman, Dave Michaels, Albert Santiago just to name a few)

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Elizabethtown, PA
    Posts
    68
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    I do have this in a PDF version. If anyone wants a copy,shoot me a PM with your email address and I'll forward it to you

  7. #7
    Bill Martins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Dundee, OR
    Posts
    131

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    James,

    I think manuever 8 is a reverse cuban. 45 upline, half roll to invert, pull through loop to horizontal.

    If I missed it I apologize.

    I really liked your narrative.

    Thanks for taking the time to instruct us.

    Bill

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Elizabethtown, PA
    Posts
    68
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative


    ORIGINAL: Bill Martins

    James,

    I think manuever 8 is a reverse cuban. 45 upline, half roll to invert, pull through loop to horizontal.

    If I missed it I apologize.

    I really liked your narrative.

    Thanks for taking the time to instruct us.

    Bill
    Bill,

    I stand corrected, I've changed it and thanks for pointing it out. I was copying stuff from the 2008 version and did not realize the problem

    Bill James

  9. #9
    exeter_acres's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Johns Creek, GA
    Posts
    7,457
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    a perfect example of why we all need to read aresti.......

    Extreme Flight RC tech support
    IMAC Vice President|IMAC Sequence Committee|IMAC National Judging Instructor|Team Futaba|Extreme Flight R/C|2014 IMAC World Championships Contest Director

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Elizabethtown, PA
    Posts
    68
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative


    ORIGINAL: exeter_acres

    a perfect example of why we all need to read aresti.......

    At least I didn't do it while calling for someone

  11. #11
    exeter_acres's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Johns Creek, GA
    Posts
    7,457
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    LOL!!

    Hey!! I resemble that remark!
    Extreme Flight RC tech support
    IMAC Vice President|IMAC Sequence Committee|IMAC National Judging Instructor|Team Futaba|Extreme Flight R/C|2014 IMAC World Championships Contest Director

  12. #12
    Jetdesign's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Mason, OH
    Posts
    7,018
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    Just wanted to say thanks again. Arresti seemed pretty foreign to me, but after looking at the narrative and the Arresti schedule side-by-side, it all became pretty clear. Basically I had to read the narrative once, and now think I can just hang on to the Arresti schedule and be all set I really feel that this was the best way for me to learn Arresti, or at least get started with it.
    Joe Marri
    Enjoying all things aviation.

  13. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Little Rock, AR
    Posts
    56
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    Let's see who can post the correct answers to the follow:

    The first thing is there is no aerobatic box. This has been replaced by the Airspace Control Score.

    1. There IS an Aerobatic box out there. It has NOT been replaced by anything. Your score will be zero for that manuever if your plane is "out of the box". Where is our aerobatic box in relation to where we stand?

    the Airspace Control Score. This score is based on the flow of the sequence

    2. The airspace control score is not based on the flow of the sequence. What is the criteria?

    Contests are not cancelled because of wind until it reaches 25 to 30 mph.

    3. This is not the rule in the F&JG? What is the rule?

    This post is meant to help us all know where the rules of IMAC are, and show that we all need know the correct rules. #3 is trivial, #1 and #2 are very important I feel. Let's stop here and log on the IMAC site and click on the Flying and Judging Guide to learn the correct answers to the above. K.

  14. #14
    exeter_acres's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Johns Creek, GA
    Posts
    7,457
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    I cannot find a reference to box dimensions.....
    please advise

    4.3 Airspace Control Score
    Judges will evaluate each individual sequence
    flown, in its entirety, for overall airspace control.
    Each judged Known and Unknown sequence,
    shall have one β€œfigure” added to the end of the
    score sheet, after individually judged maneuvers.
    This figure shall be known as the Airspace
    Control Score and will be assigned by each
    judge. The Airspace Control Score will have a K
    value dependent on the class flown. This score
    will then be multiplied by the K Value for the
    individual class.
    The following standard will be used for
    accessing the pilot’s performance in maintaining
    control and awareness of the aerobatic airspace
    and placing figures in the airspace in a manner
    that allow the figures to be optimally judges.
    The highest standard for Airspace Control will
    be the pilot that exhibits a significant ability to
    control the location of the aircraft inside the
    airspace, relative to the judges, which results in a
    tight footprint and has the aircraft such that it can
    be optimally judged at all times. The pilot that
    exhibits excellent airspace control should receive
    a ten (10).
    The lowest standard for Airspace Control will be
    the pilot that exhibits a poor ability to control the
    location of the aircraft inside the airspace,
    relative to the judges, which results in an
    excessively large footprint and has the aircraft
    consistently so far away as to be difficult to
    properly judge. The pilot that exhibits very poor
    airspace control should receive a zero (0). Pilots
    exhibiting airspace control within the range of
    these two standards will be graded with a range
    of possible scores from ten (10) to zero (0) in
    whole point increments.
    The K factors for the Airspace Control Score are:
    Basic = 3K
    Sportsman = 6K
    Intermediate = 9K
    Advanced = 12K
    Unlimited = 15K
    Extreme Flight RC tech support
    IMAC Vice President|IMAC Sequence Committee|IMAC National Judging Instructor|Team Futaba|Extreme Flight R/C|2014 IMAC World Championships Contest Director

  15. #15
    Silent-AV8R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    4,839
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative


    ORIGINAL: Danny Baker

    Let's see who can post the correct answers to the follow:

    The first thing is there is no aerobatic box. This has been replaced by the Airspace Control Score.

    1. There IS an Aerobatic box out there. It has NOT been replaced by anything. Your score will be zero for that manuever if your plane is "out of the box". Where is our aerobatic box in relation to where we stand?
    Page SCA-4: 12. Aerobatic Airspace: Refer to Flying and Judging Guide, Rule 4.1.

    Page SCA-9:
    4. Aerobatic Airspace:
    4.1: X-Axis and Y-Axis
    The X-Axis is the main axis of flight, parallel to the flight line. The Y-Axis is perpendicular to the X-Axis (flight line).
    4.2: Deadline.
    The ―Deadlineβ€– is located 100 feet (30.5 meters) in front of the contestant. This line delimits the ―no-flyβ€– zone for safety reasons. The judges shall zero (0) any maneuver where the aircraft completely crosses this deadline.

    There is no longer a defined "box" in the sense most people think. There is just the airspace in front of you. Therefore there cannot be a zero given for being out of the box.


    the Airspace Control Score. This score is based on the flow of the sequence

    2. The airspace control score is not based on the flow of the sequence. What is the criteria?
    See the post above by Exeter. Direct quote of the rule. "Flow", whatever that is, has nothing to do with this score. The actual intent of this rule was to attempt to control the footprint of the sequence as an indirect means of further litigating the noise issue. Reduce the footprint, reduce the sound footprint.


    Contests are not cancelled because of wind until it reaches 25 to 30 mph.

    3. This is not the rule in the F&JG? What is the rule?
    AMA Rule book. General Section. Page 3:

    DELAY OR CANCELLATION OF EVENTS
    Under certain conditions a sanctioned event may be canceled. Where site availability is withdrawn prior to the event, AMA Headquarters should be notified in writing immediately. Every effort will be made to provide news of such cancellations in the Model Aviation event calendar.

    Typically, such cancellation is weather-related. Conditions to be considered for the cancellation of an event due to weather or natural causes include, but are not limited to:
    Wind - strong and sustained. While wind speeds of 40 mph have been arbitrarily listed as a maximum, it should be noted that the type of models being flown dictate whether the event can be flown safely. Exceptionally strong gusts and wind direction in relation to the field layout are important considerations.

    Beyond that, a CD has every right to exercise their judgment as to when the weather conditions are no longer conducive to the safe conduct of the contest. For instance, a 20 mph cross wind directly into your face is different than a 25 mph wind straight down the runway.

    Team Futaba - RClipos.com

  16. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Little Rock, AR
    Posts
    56
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    You guys did great. The correct rule is posted above for the issues we are discussing. Thanks to all.

  17. #17

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    dallastown, PA
    Posts
    7
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    Just looked at the Basic Narrative. Good job. Is there anyone or anyplace I could find narratives for the other classes? I'm too old to want to compete anymore, but are several young fellers I have been helping, and I/We
    could sure use something to help their and my skills get better.
    Thanks, Dick Snyder n52ds@verizon.net

  18. #18
    exeter_acres's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Johns Creek, GA
    Posts
    7,457
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    IMveryHO....then the best thing you could do is teach them Aresti,,,,

    it is sooo important to learn.
    Extreme Flight RC tech support
    IMAC Vice President|IMAC Sequence Committee|IMAC National Judging Instructor|Team Futaba|Extreme Flight R/C|2014 IMAC World Championships Contest Director

  19. #19

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    long beach, CA
    Posts
    276
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    does anyone know if there's a video somewhere of the 2009 basic sequence? it's easier to memorize the sequence if i watch it being flown a few times rather than just reading it over and over again.

  20. #20
    Bob_S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Cedar ParkTx
    Posts
    247
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative


    ORIGINAL: boosted180

    does anyone know if there's a video somewhere of the 2009 basic sequence? it's easier to memorize the sequence if i watch it being flown a few times rather than just reading it over and over again.
    http://www.rcvideohub.com/play.php?vid=109
    Bob S
    Austin, Tx

  21. #21
    rodney tanner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    La HerraduraEdo. de Mexico, MEXICO
    Posts
    385
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    Bob.
    Great!
    Thanks!
    Rodney

  22. #22

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    dallastown, PA
    Posts
    7
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    I understand reading Aresti is a must, and I can do that as I have the Aresti stuff. BUT after reading the Basic narrative it is easier to tell my guys what maneuvers are. For instance can you look at the Aresti for a teardrop and know what to call it? there arre others the same way. I would still like to know where I can find narratives for the other classes. I found them a few years ago from a club up in Canada. Surely there is somebody out there that would do it for us old/new guys.
    Thanks, Dick Snyder n52ds@verizon.net

  23. #23

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Little Rock, AR
    Posts
    56
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    Dick: Imac has changed over the recent years vs. the past. Aresti is now taught at all IMAC judging schools. And guys have shyed away from the narrative versions for the savings of time. May I suggest looking onto the IMAC web site and downloading the link that will teach your guys how to read aresti. As a side note, if any of your guys are planning on flying in sportsman or higher classes, the unknown flight on Sunday at a competition will be handed to them in aresti form only, with no narrative. Go through the link for aresti reading and post your questions here and we'll try to answer any questions you have.

    Post #1 is great for the new guys, but you can't use this on the flight line. Post #1 is NOT a "call sheet". It's too long winded in text to be a call sheet. Your pilot will be on manuever #4 by the time you finish reading the text for manuever #1 from the narrative above. Being able to read aresti solves this important flight line issue.

    We are here for you, try the link on the IMAC site, and ask anything you need. Aresti is very simple in the lower classes.
    Take care, Dan.

  24. #24
    Bob_S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Cedar ParkTx
    Posts
    247
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative


    ORIGINAL: Danny Baker
    Being able to read aresti solves this important flight line issue.

    That is true enough but the caller still has to say words to the pilot. So technically (if you remove practice etc) only the caller needs to know it.

    Seriously though, I wonder if is asking for a "how to properly fly the figure" text instead of a "what is the figure". In the first narrative, he not only gives the how to (pull to vertical, 1/2 roll on the upline etc) but also gives scoring critera. So maybe the AMA rulebook would help. I know it helped me to understand exactly what is expected of each figure.

    But really, understanding of them both is really required. You can read Aresti, but if you do not know the judging criteria you'll never do well.

    AMA Rules for Scale Aerobatics http://www.modelaircraft.org/UserFil...Aerobatics.pdf

    Bob S
    Austin, Tx

  25. #25
    Bob_S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Cedar ParkTx
    Posts
    247
    Gallery
    My Gallery
    Models
    My Models
    Ratings
    My Feedback

    RE: 2009 Basic Narrative

    ORIGINAL: Bob_S


    ORIGINAL: Danny Baker
    Being able to read aresti solves this important flight line issue.

    That is true enough but the caller still has to say words to the pilot. So technically (if you remove practice etc) only the caller needs to know it.

    Seriously though, I wonder if is asking for a "how to properly fly the figure" text instead of a "what is the figure". In the first narrative, he not only gives the how to (pull to vertical, 1/2 roll on the upline etc) but also gives scoring critera. So maybe the AMA rulebook would help. I know it helped me to understand exactly what is expected of each figure.

    But really, understanding of them both is really required. You can read Aresti, but if you do not know the judging criteria you'll never do well.

    AMA Rules for Scale Aerobatics http://www.modelaircraft.org/UserFil...Aerobatics.pdf

    Maybe he's just asking for a "how to call it" text version. Looking at the aresti is one thing but the caller still has to verbalize it. If that is what he's needing then I suggest you just call each leg of the figure as they fly it. For example in that Tear Drop in the sportsman sequence, I might start by saying "Teardrop" as soon as they complete the previous figure. Then I would say "Pull to a 45 upline, positive snap on the upline." After they do the snap I would continue "Pull three quarter inside loop to a 45 downline; one half roll on the downline". After they do the half roll I would say "Pull to exit upright."
    Bob S
    Austin, Tx


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:51 PM.

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.