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Building Board Conversion

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Old 09-12-2018, 04:02 PM
  #1  
fazer
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Default Building Board Conversion

I was given a great 4' X 8' table that is in great condition but it has about a 1/2" sag in the middle and not perfectly flat. I like to use homeosote as my building surface.
This table is stout and strong and the perfect height so I really want to save it. This is my thought. Put a border around the table and pour floor leveler to level the table and place a piece of homeosote on top.
What are everyone's thoughts and any other suggestions would be appreciated.
Thank you
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Old 09-12-2018, 05:48 PM
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Depending how the top of the table is constructed, I would probably build a new table top frame that incorporates a good heavy and well supported flat top. If the structure isnít enough, the leveling agent may sag with time if it is not well supported. There is no substitute for proper structure here.
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Old 09-13-2018, 04:52 AM
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if it is a great table in good condition, it would not have a 1/2" sag in it,......sometimes "free" isn't necessarily free. my thought is that if the table has sagged, adding the weight of leveling compound is probably going to make it sag more. if you have to reinforce the table top to add the weight of leveling compound,..... you might as well consider building a new table. solid core door blanks with small defects can be had fairly cheap from building supply brokers or big box stores ,( look for one with a chip in the corner or a miss-bored lock hole) any small defect and they make excellent building tables. build a 2x6 frame around the door about 1-1/2 inches in from the edge of the door with a couple of intermediate cross ties, legs of your design or choice and you have an excellent sturdy new table for very little money. legs can be as simple as two 28 inch long 2x6's, screwed together in an "L" and bolted onto the inside of the surrounding frame. carriage bolts work good here because they can be easily removed if you need to move the table at a later date.
I have one such table and it has served me well, for many years.
if you have a dedicated room as your shop, a couple small corner brackets will secure the table to the wall and make it rock solid,....nothing better than a table that will not move or wiggle when used ! all your wall will suffer is a couple small drywall screw holes that can be easily spackled if you move the table. make sure you hit wall studs with those two screws.
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Old 09-16-2018, 07:20 AM
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This is what I did 10 years ago and it is still going strong. How about a turn/jack screw placed on the floor and under the middle of the table tops sag to screw up until flat. Placing a level over the sag to evaluate how more screwing is necessary. I placed a 2' x 4' piece on top of the turn/jackscrew to push upward from under the table from the floor to assist with leveling out the top of the table. I check the level from time to time, especially if I am building a new model. Works without fail. Chic
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Old 09-22-2018, 06:34 PM
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I would like to see a good picture of your table to study the sag. Reason? I don't know if you are talking about the top part of its frame has a sag, or if the table top has it, or if both? If just the table top, then replace that with the door mentioned by one reply. If the frame is also sagging, then add or replace with straight material to bring to level.
Let's see a photo.
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Old 09-23-2018, 07:34 PM
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I took a piece of cd 5/8 plywood and cut it down to 20"wide x 72' long and then I attached a piece of 5/8 sheet rock to the top side and set it on a roll away tool cabinet for my building board. It works great and when I get done using it I will replace the top with another piece of sheet rock.
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Old 09-24-2018, 04:08 AM
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SA Flyer - here are photos of my table. I am currently building a 102" Grumman TBF Avenger (Charlie Kellogg, here on RCU under Warbirds). The table is 3' x 8'. I used the jack stand to ensure the table is true each time I start another build. I put a new sheet of drywall onto the table each time I start another build. I don't usually add no more than 3 sheets. Chic
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Old 09-24-2018, 05:59 AM
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Redtail, that is a creative solution.
Am curious to know what the OP fazer has figured out to solve his issue.

After many years, I am planning on returning to using my building table. ARFs are to blame.
Am certain that its surface will need some leveling adjustment. If necessary, I can't use a jack stand as my table has casters to move it around in the man cave.
Replacing the 2X4's with new ones would be my route as my table's corners utilize metal brackets and wood screws. Hard part is going through all the 2X4's in the store to find straight ones. A solid core door will go on top.
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Old 09-24-2018, 07:33 AM
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Trust "Me" SA Flyer - I understand going to Lowe's or Home Depot sifting through their complete inventory for the perfect pieces. Went through all that to build my table in the first place but still needed the jack screw not long after constructing the table. A piece of glass also helped my table. Chic
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