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Types of glue??

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Old 10-01-2019, 12:48 PM
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Real2You
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Default Types of glue??

I'm curious how you guys glue your kits when building a balsa kit. I always read putting wax paper down on the plans, etc. I have always just used super glue to glue everything then reinforce it with epoxy or SIG Bond after I am done for the day. How do you do your builds? I'm curious because if I used SIG Bond or any other slow drying glue it would take forever to build a plane it seems because you would constantly be gluing and coming back later once it dries to continue. Am I doing it wrong? Does it make a difference? Advice from those that have done a lot of building would be well appreciated.
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Old 10-01-2019, 05:03 PM
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DGrant
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On small planes (glow planes up to about 1.20 size) I use medium CA(super glue to some) for general framing, ribs, fuselage bulkheads, sticks.

I always use 30min epoxy for firewalls, wing mounts, joining wing panels and attaching the tails, landing gear, etc.. and anything that will have more stress. That's about it.

I use Titebond II or III for large planes...( 50cc-100cc and bigger)..It's cheaper and stronger, cleans up very easily, but it does take a while to dry. No big deal though.

Your best bet is use epoxy and clamps for things like firewalls, etc.. as I mentioned above.

You're wasting your time using CA and then thinking your "reinforcing" with epoxy. Just use straight epoxy and clamps. Then if you want to do a small fillet or bead in the joint have at it, but forget the CA where you need epoxy.... The epoxy is far stronger when clamped then any CA joint. I'm not a fan of Sig Bond. It might be good stuff, but I have CA, epoxy, and Titebond readily available, so yeah... that's what I'm using.... Just CA and 30min epoxy will get a small plane built in no time at all.

I have several planes I've built that are over 20yrs old and seem to stand the test of time, and are well flown... Opinions do vary on this subject, but this is my experience of over 40yrs... I started well before CA glue was mainstream too.. LOL.. epoxy was hard to get too... We used a glue called Ambroid, and Testors had a clear glue too... and the old stand by was regular white glue... imagine that.. haha. Good luck with your building. Clamps are your friend man.
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Old 10-01-2019, 05:23 PM
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I've used plain ol' Titebond on the last 3 kits I've built. Easy to work with and dries reasonably quick. I've got a fresh bottle of Titebond 2 for my next project, an old school model works Javelin.

CA is still handy to have for certain places, but I just dig the clean, easy old wood glue. And epoxy of course for high stress things.
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Old 10-01-2019, 07:23 PM
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Real2You
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Thanks guys....just what I needed to hear. I have been using medium CA on everything to put it together, then reinforcing(I thought) with SIG Bond on the ribs and epoxy on the firewall and high stress points. Luckily I have only built a few smaller size planes. I'll definitely change my methods for the bigger planes I plan to build.....guess I'll have to get out the clamps..
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Old 10-02-2019, 04:48 PM
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I have been building for over 40 years and I rarely use CA glue, in fact it always goes bad in the bottle long before I use it up. When I do use it, I find that the thin is more useful than thick or medium. CA is expensive, brittle and sometimes hard to use because it cures too fast before you can get parts perfectly aligned.

For general construction I use original Titebond woodworking glue, it’s cheap, reasonably fast drying, easy to sand, and strong. Plus it’s easy to clean up excess as you go with a damp rag. I use 30 min epoxy for firewalls, wing joiners and other high stress areas. I use finishing epoxy for laminating, laying fiberglass on center section joints, fuel proofing and when mixed with micro balloons or chopped fiberglass as a filler.

I often work on several parts of the airplane at the same time so that one assembly is drying while I am working on another. I’ll often build the left wing panel, right wing panel, fuselage, and tail all at the same time on different building boards. While one assembly is drying, I just stand the boad on it’s end against a wall and move another assembly to the building table. I find that I don’t waste much time waiting for glue to dry by building this way.

Last edited by 049flyer; 10-03-2019 at 08:44 AM.
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Old 10-02-2019, 09:05 PM
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Real2You
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Seems that Titebond is used by many. I will definitely start using it on my next build and use epoxy for the firewall and other high stress areas. Heck, I've been using way to much CA...costs a lot also. A lot can be learned by asking a simple question. Thanks again!
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Old 10-03-2019, 01:07 PM
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Years ago , I was one of RCM's assistant editors/writer. We received a submission in which the writer described his use of Titebond glue.
Time was before computers, scanners, etc, the articles were put into columns on special typewriters by typists, then went to 3 of us for proofreading.
Well, the typist left out the "E" on Titebond and 3 expert proofreaders did not catch the omission. We learned about it as soon as the issue was delivered with many comments including a question as to where one purchased that special glue. Eloy Marez
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Old 10-03-2019, 01:26 PM
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�� I can see where that would cause a few chuckles..
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Old 10-03-2019, 02:22 PM
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DGrant
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Here's a little chart that lists the different Titebond glues, with specs to go with them...check it out! .
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Old 10-03-2019, 02:55 PM
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Thanks! I'll definitely be buying some Titebond II or III for my next build.
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Old 10-03-2019, 07:17 PM
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I find the original Titebond is easier to sand, I wouldn’t use it for a plane flown off of water but otherwise it works great for my building.
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Old 10-03-2019, 08:00 PM
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You might want to give the Gorilla glue FOR WOOD a shot as well. I think it dries faster than titebond 2 .. dries clear to whitish.. stays a bit rubbier? hahahah Wouldn't use it for areas that need a good finish sanding like joining wing skins.

You can buy a gallon of Titebond 2 for less than 2 ounces of odorless CA I think ! hahahahah
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Old 10-04-2019, 09:38 AM
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I use all three. The key to CA's is to have a really tight wood to wood joint. It is terrible at gap filling. It does, however, then provide as good a joint as the others. As long as the wood breaks before any of the glues, you're as strong as it needs to be. CA and epoxy are very hard to sand, Titebond is far preferable in those applications.
So:
Rapid assembly, for internal structures that fit well together: CA
Joints that have some gaps and/or you want a fillet on the outside to beef up the joint (firewalls, wing roots, etc.): Epoxy
External surfaces that will be sanded (wing sheeting edge joined, Fuse sides, etc.): Titebond.

Gorilla Glue: I mostly avoid, due to the foaming characteristic, but there sometimes are applications it can be useful for.

Many years ago I went on a Sig factory tour. Yep, "Sigbond" was just big vats of Titebond put into small bottles.....
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Old 10-04-2019, 09:41 AM
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For demanding wood joints I'm an epoxy fan (specifically WEST System: https://www.westsystem.com/).
It's designed specifically for wood-wood bonding.
You do need to be careful not to use too much or you'll add unnecessary weight.

It cures about as quickly as Titebond, so clamps are still part of the equation.
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Old 10-04-2019, 10:51 AM
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I think what I am hearing is...there is an application for each type of glue depending on what is needed. I will try an let common sense figure out which is which. Good to know about what is and isn't easy to sand as I have learned that the hard way.
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Old 10-04-2019, 01:22 PM
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BTW - get a box of baking soda. You can use it as filler in instances where you want to use CA for speed, but have a slight gap. It can foam up a bit, and will be rock hard, so avoid for anything that you may be sanding later. Yes, I have even frequently used it, with thin CA, to fill holes I've drilled in the firewall that need to be relocated.
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Old 10-04-2019, 04:42 PM
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I use mostly CA except for things that need epoxy, such as firewalls. CA is hard to sand once it's fully cured, but if you sand it within a few (up to 20, say) minutes of applying it there's no problem. Plastic modelers use CA as a filler, and that's a use that requires sanding and one in which you don't want to sand off anything but the glue itself. Not that there's anything wrong with Titebond, but if you find CA more user-friendly there's no reason not to use it.
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Old 10-05-2019, 08:43 PM
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I have been scratch building race planes for more decades than I care to admit. I use thin and medium ca for all balsa joints and epoxy for all hardwood. I use only laminating resin and not garbage minute resins. A special note here, West Systems resin is a marine resin and not a laminating resin and should never be used as such. The makers of West resin make a true laminating resin (Pro Set) that is a vary high quality resin. West 105 is probably the worst choice one could make when one needs a laminating resin, but one of the best marine resins available if you require repairs of your boat.

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Old 10-07-2019, 06:52 AM
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Controversial subject, but this is what I use with excellent results. I almost never use any type of CA when building if I can help it. Some builds however require the use of CA because of the type of construction involved. I don't like the fumes and health risks that one is exposed using CA. Other than hardening wood threads, I try to avoid the use of CA.
So what glue do I use? In my builds I use Titebond II for most basic construction along with a good quality 30 minute epoxy. I've been using Bob Smith's epoxy products and have been very happy with the results. Keep in mind when one should use epoxy. When assembling firewalls or anything associated with landing gear, laminating plywood to plywood or mounting the tail feathers onto your plane you should be using epoxy.

Using Titebond glue over CA does slow down the build process, but that's OK with me as I'm not in a rush. Sanding Titbond is also easier than sanding something that has been wicked with CA.

Just my 2 cents, good luck with your projects...
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Old 10-08-2019, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Real2You View Post
I think what I am hearing is...there is an application for each type of glue depending on what is needed. I will try an let common sense figure out which is which. Good to know about what is and isn't easy to sand as I have learned that the hard way.
Yup.
Read all the information/opinions along with your personal experience and assemble your own toolkit of adhesives and applications!
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Old 10-08-2019, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by VincentJ View Post
... I've been using Bob Smith's epoxy products and have been very happy with the results. ...
Thanks for the pointer. I've had good luck with Bob Smith Industries products for 30'ish years now, but I've never tried their epoxy.
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Old 10-13-2019, 02:34 PM
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Another advantage to Titebond is that it does not stick your fingers to each other or to your project!
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Old 11-05-2019, 08:59 AM
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I'm currently chewing CA off of my fingers from last night's wing-building session. Trying the Super-Phatic for some pieces of my 1/6 cub build, seems strong and flexible!
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Old 11-08-2019, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by tedsander View Post

Many years ago I went on a Sig factory tour. Yep, "Sigbond" was just big vats of Titebond put into small bottles.....
Which version of Titebond is Sigbond?
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Old 11-08-2019, 01:13 PM
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Original formula Titebond.
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