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Thread: What frequency


  1. #1
    JollyPopper's Avatar
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    What frequency

    I was given a Parkzone Cub today and it appears to be complete with the exception of battery and transmitter. My question is if there is any way to ascertain what frequency this airplane is on? I would fly it if I can get a transmitter and battery for it.
    \"In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; In practice, there is\"

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    Aussie Damo's Avatar
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    digital or analog

    Hey Jolly Popper.

    It all depends what type of receiver is Cub.
    There are 2 main types of transmissions used. Analog and Digital.

    Analog uses what called crystals (small meltalic 2 pin things that look like capictors) to set the frequency to something specific ie 36.470 mHz like in the picture below. By using individual frequencies people avoid interference while flying at the same time. People do get "shot down" every once in a while when someone turns on their transmitter with the same frequency crystal in.

    The crystal is removed and on the left
    Click image for larger version. 

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    On the other hand there is Digital which works in the 2.4Ghz range and using the black art of binding (not really, its amazing) where using fancy electronics you "bind" your transmitter to the receiver and it automatically using frequencies and digital transmissions that only your receiver will accept.

    In the picture the receiver on the left is analog (specifically in the 36mHz range) and the one on the right is Digital (with clearly no space for a crystal to be stuck in) A really quick way to tell them apart is digital has very short antennas and analog generally longer (ie 12 inches). This isnt a dead fast rule so if you are unsure post a picture of your receiver and we should be able to help you out

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I hope this helps

    Damien
    Dead stick landings are the easiest. Doesn't matter your attitude, elevation or airspeed - it's all down hill from there.

  3. #3
    Moderator aeajr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JollyPopper View Post
    I was given a Parkzone Cub today and it appears to be complete with the exception of battery and transmitter. My question is if there is any way to ascertain what frequency this airplane is on? I would fly it if I can get a transmitter and battery for it.
    Parkzone made a variety of cubs. Some were on 27 MHz and some on 2.4 GHz.

    What color is it?

    What is the wing span? Measure it from tip to tip.


    Depends on how old it is. If it is one of the original Parkzone super cubs then it was likely on 27 MHz. There are 6 potential channels.

    If it is one of the new DSM Super cubs then it is on Spektrum 2.5 GHz and any Spekturm radio should work.

    Can you post a photo?


    Look to see if there is an antenna hanging out of the plane. If there is, then it is on 27 MHz. IF there is no antenna it is probably on 2.4 GHz.

    If you can get to the receiver, look for the antenna. If there is one and it is more than 6" long then it is on 27 MHz. If you can see a short antenna, perhaps 2, then it is on 2.4 GHz. There are no channels on 2.4 GHz so any spectrum radio will work.

    There are probably two and they are probably very short, about an inch or so. If they are longer, say 16" or longer then it is 27 MHz.

    This is the manual for the Super Cub RTF DSM on 2.4 GHz. This may be helpful.
    http://www.horizonhobby.com/pdf/HBZ7400-Manual_EN.pdf


    A photo of the plane may help.
    Last edited by aeajr; 12-14-2013 at 03:00 PM.
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