Questions and Answers If you have general RC questions or answers discuss it here.

Glow Fuel Proof paint/coating

Reply

Old 07-26-2014, 07:25 AM
  #1  
dasintex
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (10)
 
dasintex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Displaced Canadian in Central Texas TX
Posts: 2,598
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default Glow Fuel Proof paint/coating

Other than Epoxy, what is truly Glow Fuel Proof, I know Water Based Poly is not, what about laquer varnishes?
dasintex is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2014, 08:05 AM
  #2  
jester_s1
Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,746
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

-The Systems 3 water based poly is when you use the crosslinker they sell. I'd say it's the best choice due to not needing a special reducer for thinning and cleanup, not having a lot of volatile fumes to worry about breathing, and it's compatible with a lot of different kinds of base color coats. They sell it in colors too if you want a single coat finish.
-Most 2 part automotive urethanes are fuel proof. But they are expensive unless you have an auto man who is willing to shoot a coat onto your plane with what he has left in the spray gun after doing a car.
-Some lacquers are fuel proof, and some are not. Butyrate dope is a lacquer and is impervious to glow fuel, and Top Flight Lusterkote is an acetone based acrylic lacquer that is fuel proof. But don't expect the hardware store lacquers to be.
-Experiences vary on various enamels being fuel proof. Some have used Rustoleum enamel with good results, while others have had them go gummy in use.
jester_s1 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2014, 09:51 AM
  #3  
RCPAUL
My Feedback: (1)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Gahanna, OH
Posts: 1,118
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Butyrate is not fuel proof - it is fuel resistant! It will come off if you get full strength fuel on the finish and rub it with a rag or let it sit. The basic Rustoleum colors, says fights rust on the can, (black, white, yellow, blue, red) are fuel proof, at least to 15%. The clear and the other designer colors are not. But, Rustoleum is very heavy.

be careful of the auto 2-part paints - they can be very toxic!
RCPAUL is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2014, 11:25 AM
  #4  
Rodney
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: FL
Posts: 7,769
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Even the so called fuel proof Rustoleum needs to cure (it cures, not dries) for at least 20 to 30 days to be reasonably fuel resistant.
Rodney is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2014, 07:30 PM
  #5  
jester_s1
Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,746
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

What are you topcoating, dasintex? That will narrow your choices down considerably.
jester_s1 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2014, 07:36 PM
  #6  
dasintex
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (10)
 
dasintex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Displaced Canadian in Central Texas TX
Posts: 2,598
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Its a Landing Skid on a Combat Plane, made from Thin Ply and will be exposed to Glow Fuel.
dasintex is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 02:58 AM
  #7  
TomCrump
 
TomCrump's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Traverse City, MI
Posts: 7,613
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by Rodney View Post
Even the so called fuel proof Rustoleum needs to cure (it cures, not dries) for at least 20 to 30 days to be reasonably fuel resistant.
Please elaborate. "Cure, nor dries."
TomCrump is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 05:50 AM
  #8  
jester_s1
Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,746
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Some paints cure, others dry. Lacquers dry, because the process is simply the evaporation of solvent leaving behind the binder and pigment. That's why lacquers can be ready to use so quickly, because once they are dry everything that's going to happen has happened. But enamels undergo a chemical change after they dry which hardens them up and makes them resistant to whatever chemicals they'll be resistant to. That process is curing, and it takes a good bit longer. Curing is why you can paint your house with water based latex paint and not see it all wash off in the next rainstorm.
jester_s1 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 07:01 AM
  #9  
THERCAV8R
My Feedback: (283)
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Madison, AL
Posts: 186
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

If it is just a tail skid either coat it with epoxy or saturate it with Thin CA. they are both fuel proof. just remember if the tail skid wears off any coating while it slides along the surface then fuel will be absorbed at the exposed site.
THERCAV8R is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 07:19 AM
  #10  
dasintex
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (10)
 
dasintex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Displaced Canadian in Central Texas TX
Posts: 2,598
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by THERCAV8R View Post
If it is just a tail skid either coat it with epoxy or saturate it with Thin CA. they are both fuel proof. just remember if the tail skid wears off any coating while it slides along the surface then fuel will be absorbed at the exposed site.
Appreciate the reply, I was hoping someone knew for sure if something other than Epoxy would work, I liked the idea of possible using a Varnish or something, that I could just brush on without having to mix and thin, etc like Epoxy. I guess I will have to settle for Epoxy, if anything, it will add some strength. As far as wearing the finish off from landing, theres an Aluminum wear bar to take care of that.
dasintex is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 07:53 AM
  #11  
jkpape
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: LaGrange, KY
Posts: 238
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Unfortunately, lacquer is not fuel proof.
jkpape is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 09:22 AM
  #12  
YellowBlueBird
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: raleigh, NC
Posts: 267
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Jester_s1,
How much of the system 3 water based poly would it take to cover a 60 sized model with one coat and how many coats would it take to get a good solid color?
Weight compered to dope?
YellowBlueBird is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 03:31 PM
  #13  
049flyer
My Feedback: (18)
 
049flyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Tyler, TX
Posts: 1,059
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

The problem with hardware store paint is that since it is NOT formulated for glow fuel the manufacturer often changes the formulation to improve it's properties for it's target customer. Therefore one can of paint may be fuel resistant while another of the same brand may not. Spend your money and take your chance but if it doesn't work how much did you really save?

Butyrate dope should be resistant to at least 15% but seems to be more resistant as it ages. I have read that clear dope is MORE fuel resistant than color dope, something about the colors being more porous.

I am experimenting with water based Nelson Hobby paint now. Goes on great with a foam brush and cleans up easy. Some colors cover better than others. Tried to wipe some off after it cured, with dope thinner, seemed to resist that pretty well.

Don't forget about Klass Kote epoxy paint.
049flyer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 03:50 PM
  #14  
Gray Beard
My Feedback: (-1)
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Hemderson, NV
Posts: 14,380
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Lusterkote is fuel proof/resistant but it takes about 10 days plus to harden-set up-dry.
Gray Beard is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 04:55 PM
  #15  
TomCrump
 
TomCrump's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Traverse City, MI
Posts: 7,613
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by YellowBlueBird View Post
Jester_s1,
How much of the system 3 water based poly would it take to cover a 60 sized model with one coat and how many coats would it take to get a good solid color?
Weight compered to dope?
That depends on the hiding power of the colors involved. Yellows and reds are low in hide, and will require more coats. Whites are high in hiding power.

In most cases, a pint of Nelson Paint (system 3) should be enough to paint a 60 sized model.
TomCrump is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 06:21 PM
  #16  
aspeed
 
aspeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Ruthven, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,294
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Polyester resin is fuelproof. Not really a topcoat. If it is a combat plane, it won't last long??? Anyway, I have heard rumblings of mixing automotive hardeners with better quality hardware store enamels to get fuelproofing. I may try that soon.
aspeed is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 07:40 PM
  #17  
jester_s1
Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,746
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

i'd just hit the landing skid with some finishing resin. It's thin enough to flow out like paint, so there's no thinning required.
jester_s1 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2014, 08:50 PM
  #18  
Sport_Pilot
 
Sport_Pilot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Acworth, GA
Posts: 16,916
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Plastikote sell an acrylic laquer that is fuel proof to about 20% nitro. You find it in automobile parts stores. But read the can contents, as they also sell some enamels that may not be fuel proof.
Sport_Pilot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2014, 12:27 PM
  #19  
scale only 4 me
My Feedback: (158)
 
scale only 4 me's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Avon Lake, OH
Posts: 9,901
Gallery
My Gallery
Models
My Models
Ratings
My Feedback
Default

Originally Posted by YellowBlueBird View Post
Jester_s1,
How much of the system 3 water based poly would it take to cover a 60 sized model with one coat and how many coats would it take to get a good solid color?
Weight compered to dope?
One 8oz jar will be enough if you use Bear Flat sample sizes for the colors,then the satin or gloss clear,,, it's the more economical way to go.. the systems 3 itself isn't cheap

see thread.. Will it be good for another 15 years?
Start about post #36

good luck

p.s.
I've tested it with 30% nitro car fuel,, it's bullet proof

Last edited by scale only 4 me; 07-29-2014 at 12:29 PM.
scale only 4 me is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service