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How should I store my engines for the winter?

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Old 01-03-2018, 01:33 PM
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jimmy7432
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Default How should I store my engines for the winter?

Most of my experience is with glow engines. But this spring I started flying a gas engine I installed on a plane I had completed. I have not seen much information on storing these engines for long periods of time. Can I use the same after run engine oil I use on my glow engine or is there something else I should use and where and how should it be used?
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Old 01-03-2018, 06:18 PM
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jester_s1
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You don't need it. The only thing that's really needed is to not store them with ethanol blended fuel if you can help it. Run some pure gas with standard 2 stroke oil for a few minutes and it'll make it just fine. If it doesn't start up for you in the spring pretty easily, you may need to get the diaphragm and pump wet with fuel again.
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Old 01-03-2018, 07:18 PM
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Yeap,, just run the carb dry,, mine fire up fine in the spring
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Old 01-04-2018, 09:52 AM
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Same basic engine as your weed whacker or your chain saw or your lawn mower. We don't seem to do much to them at the end of fall as a rule.
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Old 01-05-2018, 11:06 PM
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Steve Percifield
 
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I'll just pass this along as information. A couple years ago , those of us who use gas engines talked about how to store them for any length of time. Of course many opinions. I decided to ask an expert. I went to the local Stihl dealer and ask if I could talk to their engine repair tech. Here is his answer on 3 questions. #1: Should I seek out non alcohol gasoline. Answer. Doesn't matter any more. All carb manufactures have been using material resistant to alcohol in gas for many years now. Just use pump gas, no problems. Question 2. Should I run the engine dry for storage. Answer: No, running the engine dry will allow the gaskets and membranes to dry out and if stored for any length of time crack, For storage, stop the engine by chocking. This will keep the maximum amount of fuel in the engine. Then leave gasoline in the tank, about 1/4 full. #3: Should I use high octane gas . Answer: No, high octane gas has chemical adders to prevent preignition in high compression engines. Does nothing for the 2 stroke engines we use.

This is for info only. I'm not debating any of this, just passing it along.

steve
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Old 01-06-2018, 09:40 AM
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Well I disagree with your tech on leaving fuel in it,, what happens is the gas evaporates anyway and your left with oil residue that can clog stuff up, and that's can be a problem in the spring, I've always run mine dry,, from my weedwacker to my outboard motors,, it's worked well for me
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Old 01-08-2018, 04:50 AM
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I can report there is a difference of opinion among engine mechanics over the harmful effects of alcohol. The last time I took my weedeater in for service, it needed a new carb. The reason was the check valves for the primer bulb had swollen and hardened. The labor cost to repair would have been more than the parts cost to replace so I got a new carb. The mechanic told me he almost never saw those kinds of problems before ethanol, but now it keeps him in business. My own personal experience agrees- my dad had a chainsaw he used every fall to cut firewood. It probably went 15 years without a tuneup or any kind of service. Now my weedeater needs a carb kit about every 3 years, as do many of our plane engines.
I do realize there are alcohol resistant rubber parts for 2 stroke carbs now, but I still am not convinced that they stop all of the problems that ethanol causes.
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Old Yesterday, 06:29 AM
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Greg Wright
 
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I fly them hard and put away wet!!!!!
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Old Today, 08:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scale only 4 me View Post
Well I disagree with your tech on leaving fuel in it,, what happens is the gas evaporates anyway and your left with oil residue that can clog stuff up, and that's can be a problem in the spring, I've always run mine dry,, from my weedwacker to my outboard motors,, it's worked well for me
Former Stihl tech here. I live within 50 miles of at least 8 ethanol plants. I think it helps to have some of the freshest ethanol in the US here where I live. So I had some customer run their engine dry and some would leave them wet. Personally I leave fuel in all my engines and I don't seem to have any issues with carbs. I have an old Stihl 015. The saw has to be at least 30 years old. I got it used about 15 years ago and have never done any carb work to it. Always used E-10 in it. Even if the gas does evaporate out of the carb leaving the oil, gasoline will solve the oil pretty quickly. The oil will help preserve the rubber parts. I told my customers to do what they thought best. I can't say I had many issues with wet or dry storage.

Ken
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