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High rate ,low rate

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Old 01-13-2018, 06:24 AM
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mashp39
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Question High rate ,low rate

I have noticed in several old kits that only one throw rate is given. I am now building a Sig King Kobra and am wondering about what to use for the throw rates. Should the manual rates be the high or low rates?Should these rates be used for the low and the high be at say +25% of these or should these be the high and the low rates be about 75% of these? The old kits were to be used with old radio's without dual rates.What are your thoughts?
Also I am going to position the vertical tail back so the rudder will be over the elevator. The rudder will be shaped like a KIWI rudder. Any thoughts on this as to the effect on rudder control?
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Old 01-13-2018, 07:30 AM
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Never owned one but flew several back in the day. These can be a handful with a stout 2 stroke up front. I would set the high rate to be what the book says and put 30% expo on the aile and elev, 15% on the rudder. For low rate I would cut back to 60%-70% of the high and put about 15% expo on aile and elev, 0% on rudder. Let me also say I have no idea of your skill level. These planes are not hard to fly but when you get them 120MPH or so the control inputs happen right now. Other thing I would say, get a little airspeed on take off. Again I don't know what you are flying now and don't mean to offend. Just trying to help.
As far as you moving the fin. Can't help you there but wonder why? This is a really good design. I personally would leave it.

David
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Old 01-13-2018, 02:29 PM
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mashp39
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Sounds about what I thought for movements.I am now flying a Sig Kougar Mark II. It does very well. As for moving the stab, It is just something I want to do for looks but not if it will cause any problems.
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Old 01-15-2018, 07:30 AM
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The KK flyes better than the Kougar IMHO so you should be good to go. You may make it a better plane moving the tail. I just don't have a clue. I've often wondered what the advantages are. The old Cap 231 was the same way. There must have been a reason the original designer did it that way.

David
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Old 01-15-2018, 08:06 PM
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If I were in your position, I would find a 3 position switch and set up triple rates. Use the book rates for middle, go 75% ish for low as David stated, and go about 120% or so for high. Take off on low, try mid, try high, and make final decisions after a few flights. Some pilots prefer very responsive planes, while some don't.

Scott
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Old 01-16-2018, 01:15 PM
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melgraham
 
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Scott,
That is very good advice. I was thinking the same thing. I tend to fly soft with more stick movement, while others like less.
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