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Why not to swim after your boat

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Old 11-16-2017, 01:51 AM
  #76  
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Originally Posted by expresscraft View Post
People swimming for any reason, including getting there toy boat. is no big deal if you can swim and are in shape to swim.
Problem is that someone going to the lake for a swim is generally there for the purpose of swimming and capable of swimming. Someone whos RC boat stopped working is not. They are swimming as a last resort - out of desperation. They are swimming under conditions that are less than ideal. Cold water, snags and weeds, longer distances, and not strong swimmers to begin with. Thats when people die.
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Old 11-16-2017, 07:09 AM
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It is amazing how many folks just don’t use their critical thinking processes whenever this topic comes up. A person simply cannot “swim” while holding/carrying a toy boat. The focus is on getting that expensive toy to shore, not on swimming. He usually can’t use the boat as a float to help him stay afloat, in fact the opposite is often the case. It takes him far longer to travel relatively short distances, increasing his exposure to low temperature water and the risk of hypothermia and exhaustion.

The fact that that so many people have actually died from these illadvised attempts should warn us of the dangers. But instead, some will still insist that it cannot happen to them because (insert excuse here). Stulti irruitis....


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Old 11-16-2017, 08:13 AM
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Nobody with a toy boat after paying there, car, there house there bill's and then still have money for a toy boat can cry poor mouth...Again, if you make the CHOICE to go to the lake with no way top get your boat. It is not a Emergency. Getting in the water and not being able to swim, or roll over on your back and tread water to wait for your cramp to go away is your problem....NOT model Boating's problem,
I feel the same way about people saying being a drug addict or a drunk is a disease, It's not It's a choice your WEAK but chooses.5 year old kids with Cancer have disease's. Lot's of grown people are just stupid. I can say that. I have done plenty of stupid things in my life. It's called Living. would not change places with any money rich people that sit there life on the porch.
,
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Old 11-18-2017, 07:40 AM
  #79  
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Originally Posted by Got RPM View Post
It is amazing how many folks just don’t use their critical thinking processes whenever this topic comes up. A person simply cannot “swim” while holding/carrying a toy boat. .


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I'd imagine a scissor kick or frog kick swim would be most effective in this situation.
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Old 11-18-2017, 03:03 PM
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I guess if I can't bring a retrieval boat to the lake that a life jacket and lasso or some kind of string and magnet would be the next best thing. If the water is too cold, I would likely have the retrieval boat for sure. A fishing pole is almost useless on a big lake. Lake Erie is in my back yard with a big hill and rocks at the bottom, so a retrieval boat is tough. Tough to get it back up the hill after anyway.
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Old 11-18-2017, 07:42 PM
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This latest death was due to stupidity and greed:
Stupidity on the part of the boater
Greed and stupidity on the part of the departed.
When you consider the fact that all but one of Washington State's ski areas are open AND HAVE BEEN FOR SEVERAL DAYS, water being numbingly cold SHOULD have been expected. At the very least, the guy that went in should have worn some sort of life jacket and, better yet, been tied to a safety line so that, if he got in trouble(which he obviously did), he could have been pulled back to shore. Better still, he shouldn't have gone in to begin with.

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Old 11-22-2017, 05:44 AM
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I don’t swim after my boat at any point. I live in Florida and we have alligators lol
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Old 11-22-2017, 05:45 AM
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I just normally sit and wait until it comes ashore. This thing is not worth my life or limbs. At the end of the day it’s a toy and I have kids to come home to
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Old 11-24-2017, 11:41 PM
  #84  
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Originally Posted by Got RPM View Post
Sadly similar to this story - https://patch.com/new-york/sachem/mi...ake-ronkonkoma
Weiner, who was at Lake Ronkonkoma County Park with his two children just down the block from their home, went into the water at 8:30 p.m. Friday "to retrieve a remote controlled boat that was disabled," police said.

Weiner swam 150-200 feet offshore in an attempt to reach the boat, which was owned by a stranger also at the park, police said.

Newsday reported that three men had offered Weiner, an unemployed security guard, $40 to retrieve the boat.
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:31 AM
  #85  
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Originally Posted by dicko View Post
This guy got lucky.
To say the least..
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Old 01-22-2019, 11:56 PM
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I'm new to this forum and don't wanna make any waves; pun intended But I don't understand the implied rule of NEVER swimming for a boat. Sure, if you can't swim then by all means don't try to learn on the spur of the moment. If your boat is in a current, which could be deceptively swift, then by all means don't try it. In colder weather or rough water, I always have a kayak standing by. But I have an obsession with long distance running and swimming, and during the summer months I routinely swim 5-7 miles (in deep water, Green River Lake, Kentucky) both for fun and to stay in shape. I do this alone and with no support, but I have been an avid swimmer all of my life; I'm an former lifeguard and have had professional training in "survival swimming." Three summers ago I swam 10 miles non-stop, so why wouldn't I swim after a $350 boat and LiPo that's maybe a few hundred feet away? Yeah I know, I could still drown; almost have on a few occasions but they've been while kayaking on whitewater rivers. I have only been into RC boats for two years and I have rescued my Proboats by swimming after them (in calm lakes and during warm weather) more times than I could possibly count. Contrary to what others have posted, I can swim just fine by holding my Blackjack or Shockwave in my arms and swimming by only kicking my legs ... or I can hold the RC boat between my knees and swim by just using my arms. I once towed in a struggling ~200lb man at Lake Cumberland so I'm pretty sure I can handle a boat weighing a couple pounds.

You are more likely to get killed in a car accident while driving to the lake than you are to drown in that lake. Again, I don't mean to sound like a smartass but I have lived in, on or around the water all of my life. I do evaluate the situation BEFORE launching an RC boat and have on a few occasions changed my mind and went home; not because I was afraid for my life but because I was afraid I would lose my boat. I do believe that the safety of human lives takes priority and everyone should use your best judgement, err on the side of caution, know your limitations as a swimmer, and STILL use a kayak or other watercraft if possible.
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Old 01-23-2019, 03:32 AM
  #87  
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Charles, while your abilities are admirable, they are not common. I hope, with all sincerity, that you do not get a posthumous mention in this thread.
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Old 01-23-2019, 07:22 AM
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Thing is Charles - you do have to drive to the lake. You don't have to swim for your boat. I have no doubt the 5 or 6 guys who gave their life for an RC boat last year did not think it a life or death decision.

Read this story from 4 months ago - https://www.wearegreenbay.com/news/l...oat/1437763515 it sums up the reality well. Boat moves further away as the victim swims for it.

Also consider water temperature - even in Kentucky water temperatures average 45 degrees in Feb. You can't swim as well as you think you can - guaranteed!! https://gcaptain.com/cold_water/

Also worth noting that I know of at least two members of this forum who are no longer with us due 100% to swimming for their boat. I know of no member who died driving to the lake. I disagree with the statistic of being more likely to die driving to the lake than swimming for your boat. 99% of boaters drive to the lake and only a fraction swim for their boat. But you are 100% more likely to drown swimming for your boat than if you didn't.

We don't enforce the rule - "don't swim for your boat". Everyone is responsible for themselves. But we do share this information for a reason! If I never see another headline where an RC boater drowned it will be too soon. And with the surge in popularity of electrics it is clear that there will be more and more new boaters.
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Old 01-23-2019, 07:35 AM
  #89  
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The process of natural selection at work!!!!!!!!!
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Old 01-24-2019, 06:34 AM
  #90  
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The southern bous DO have serious risks now.

Crocs alligators boa constrictors pythons muck quicksand fishing lines & hooks on anything in the water

Mother Nature removes the brave ones.

Last edited by cyclops2; 01-24-2019 at 06:42 AM.
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Old 01-29-2019, 06:59 AM
  #91  
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Originally Posted by Charles Vane View Post
I'm new to this forum and don't wanna make any waves; pun intended But I don't understand the implied rule of NEVER swimming for a boat. Sure, if you can't swim then by all means don't try to learn on the spur of the moment. If your boat is in a current, which could be deceptively swift, then by all means don't try it. In colder weather or rough water, I always have a kayak standing by. But I have an obsession with long distance running and swimming, and during the summer months I routinely swim 5-7 miles (in deep water, Green River Lake, Kentucky) both for fun and to stay in shape. I do this alone and with no support, but I have been an avid swimmer all of my life; I'm an former lifeguard and have had professional training in "survival swimming." Three summers ago I swam 10 miles non-stop, so why wouldn't I swim after a $350 boat and LiPo that's maybe a few hundred feet away? Yeah I know, I could still drown; almost have on a few occasions but they've been while kayaking on whitewater rivers. I have only been into RC boats for two years and I have rescued my Proboats by swimming after them (in calm lakes and during warm weather) more times than I could possibly count. Contrary to what others have posted, I can swim just fine by holding my Blackjack or Shockwave in my arms and swimming by only kicking my legs ... or I can hold the RC boat between my knees and swim by just using my arms. I once towed in a struggling ~200lb man at Lake Cumberland so I'm pretty sure I can handle a boat weighing a couple pounds.

You are more likely to get killed in a car accident while driving to the lake than you are to drown in that lake. Again, I don't mean to sound like a smartass but I have lived in, on or around the water all of my life. I do evaluate the situation BEFORE launching an RC boat and have on a few occasions changed my mind and went home; not because I was afraid for my life but because I was afraid I would lose my boat. I do believe that the safety of human lives takes priority and everyone should use your best judgement, err on the side of caution, know your limitations as a swimmer, and STILL use a kayak or other watercraft if possible.
I have to agree with the others who say not to swim for a boat. Saving a man in distress is admirable. It's also something you were trained to do. Swimming 10 miles is something I couldn't do and have no plans on trying. Swimming after a $350 boat that's a few hundred feet away is something I wouldn't even try. One of the lakes my club races on is fed by an underground stream. This creates a serious undertow that has pulled several people under. One person was found, snagged in that underground stream, almost a year after disappearing. Would you like to take a chance on swimming after a boat with that unseen danger lurking under the surface?
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Old 02-01-2019, 12:09 PM
  #92  
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I have got a leg / calf wedged TIGHTLY in a V of a branch. Scary How I struggled to rip loose. Blood soaked jeans.
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Old 02-01-2019, 06:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
I have to agree with the others who say not to swim for a boat. Saving a man in distress is admirable. It's also something you were trained to do. Swimming 10 miles is something I couldn't do and have no plans on trying. Swimming after a $350 boat that's a few hundred feet away is something I wouldn't even try. One of the lakes my club races on is fed by an underground stream. This creates a serious undertow that has pulled several people under. One person was found, snagged in that underground stream, almost a year after disappearing. Would you like to take a chance on swimming after a boat with that unseen danger lurking under the surface?
I can assure everyone that bringing in a three pound RC boat is infinitely safer than a struggling person. I have indeed swam after my Shockwave in a river with a very strong undertow and underwater debris. Learn the river well enough and you can use the undertow to pull you away from a rough spot. I know the areas of the river where I play with my RC's intimately and I'm not really sure what to say, everyone asks "Would you risk your life for a $350 boat?" and my reply would be "Absolutely, I would gladly risk my life for free and routinely do so many times per year." I can't wait for May when I'll do my first 8k/5m swim of the year. What can I say? I'm an adrenaline junkie and I belong in the water. It was 2deg F the other day in Kentucky and I went kayaking; there are many ways in which I envision myself dying, drowning isn't one of them.

I never imagined my comment getting this much attention and the last thing that I would want to do would be encourage something to do something that they were not comfortable. I would like to strenuously advise anyone NOT swim for their boats unless they are expert swimmers and the boat is dead in calm water, Even so, if possible, still use a kayak or other watercraft.
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Old 02-02-2019, 12:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Charles Vane View Post
I can assure everyone that bringing in a three pound RC boat is infinitely safer than a struggling person. I have indeed swam after my Shockwave in a river with a very strong undertow and underwater debris. Learn the river well enough and you can use the undertow to pull you away from a rough spot. I know the areas of the river where I play with my RC's intimately and I'm not really sure what to say, everyone asks "Would you risk your life for a $350 boat?" and my reply would be "Absolutely, I would gladly risk my life for free and routinely do so many times per year." I can't wait for May when I'll do my first 8k/5m swim of the year. What can I say? I'm an adrenaline junkie and I belong in the water. It was 2deg F the other day in Kentucky and I went kayaking; there are many ways in which I envision myself dying, drowning isn't one of them.

I never imagined my comment getting this much attention and the last thing that I would want to do would be encourage something to do something that they were not comfortable. I would like to strenuously advise anyone NOT swim for their boats unless they are expert swimmers and the boat is dead in calm water, Even so, if possible, still use a kayak or other watercraft.
Your comment got my attention more for what it said about you, not about a dead boat. To sum it up, I got the following:
1) You're a trained and experienced lifeguard/rescue swimmer
2) You're an experienced long distance swimmer
3) If something goes wrong while you're in the water, you're not one that would panic like many would
All of that said, I do appreciate your last paragraph. It came across, to me anyway, as do as I say and not as I do unless you're qualified to do so. That, in a nutshell, is where the problem comes from. Too many overestimate their swimming ability and end up in serious trouble. Those are the ones that we need to keep out of the water since they are the ones most likely to either need help to get back to the beach or don't make it back alive
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Old 02-02-2019, 06:21 AM
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Maybe the best thing to come out of this thread is to bring at least a life jacket with you to the lake/pond, if you don't have a retrieval boat. If you have Gators, maybe bring Crocodile Dundee. I keep threatening to fly in my back yard on Lake Erie, but don't want to drag my little sailboat down the steep hill for nothing, and then back up.Maybe I should pull the trigger and carry the life jacket. Right now, maybe a snowmobile as well.
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Old 02-02-2019, 11:04 PM
  #96  
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
Your comment got my attention more for what it said about you, not about a dead boat. To sum it up, I got the following:
1) You're a trained and experienced lifeguard/rescue swimmer
2) You're an experienced long distance swimmer
3) If something goes wrong while you're in the water, you're not one that would panic like many would
All of that said, I do appreciate your last paragraph. It came across, to me anyway, as do as I say and not as I do unless you're qualified to do so. That, in a nutshell, is where the problem comes from. Too many overestimate their swimming ability and end up in serious trouble. Those are the ones that we need to keep out of the water since they are the ones most likely to either need help to get back to the beach or don't make it back alive
I understand how that came across and you are probably right, I suppose that's exactly what I'm saying. I'm also into several extreme sports and I know that overestimating your own abilities is a very dangerous thing to do whether you're rappelling, whitewater kayaking or mountain biking. I suppose that not everyone realizes this or realizes why and I've just been doing this kind of thing for so long so sometimes I take it for granted that everyone knows and respects their own limits. As I mentioned before, I've taken my RC boats and kayak down to a nearby river during flash flood warnings many times and several of those times I've stood and watched the water for 20min or so; then changed my mind, packed everything up and went home. I do know that we all have limits regardless of our skills and/or abilities, and for the record, just because I once swam 10mi in deep water doesn't that I'd ever try that with any kind of cargo including an RC boat. I need to stop assuming that anyone else will know, understand and respect their own limits. I just took the "never" part of the post literally and actually laughed out loud because I've swam after mine sooooo many times. Some members of this group have boats that cost a lot more than mine and I just wanted to make the point that it seemed ridiculous to watch an expensive RC boat float away when I could easily swim out the 200-300ft, grab it and be back on shore in ten minutes. Although I may have misspoke, I in no way intended to encourage anyone else to do the same.

Everyone reading this should know that doing a few laps in your local public pool is NOT the same as swimming in a pond, a lake, a river or even in a small creek. The catch is, and most people don't realize this, that by the time you realize you're in trouble, it's already too late. Simple precautions can be taken to save your boat without building or risking a "rescue" boat, or using a drone with dangling hooks, etc. Someone mentioned swimming with a US Coast Guard approved life jacket and that seems like a reasonable approach in warm water with no current. In cold water or slow moving currents a kayak is a good thing to have standing by. In fast moving water, it's probably best to go home and fire up an RC truck or quadcopter instead.
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Old 02-06-2019, 01:30 PM
  #97  
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The unexpected can happen at any pleasant moment. Fishing in a small shallow rocky stream.

I t is at most 20 feet wide. 4 feet deep with some current. Fished it hundreds of times alone & with others. I step forward while fishing in the current & suddenly I am bent backwards. At the knees looking up thru the water. I struggle a few seconds to pull loose & arch up for air. Nope. I am going to drown !!. I push the fly rod into the boulders under me. Air. I breath forever. Some how I twist my body to one side & pull my stuck foot free.
To look at that creek. You would take any child into it.
Luck is most important in life. Skill & experience count in day to day things. BUUTT Luck beats all the skill in the universe
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