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Old 05-18-2017, 02:46 PM
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RCH84
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Default New to the RC world

Hey everyone whats going on? Like the title suggests I'm a noob that wants to start getting into RC cars/trucks and eventually racing, I just don't know where to start. I live in the Phoenix area and I've researched some RC stores/tracks in the area and I plan on visiting them soon. My main question is where is the best place to start? Are certain vehicles better to start out with, ex. truggy, buggy, truck, short track, car, and size, or is it mainly preference? Im pretty sure I want to start out electric just from everything I have read it seems like it's the easier place to start. Also what are some brands I should be looking into/staying away from. I don't want to dump a ton of money into it right away since I'm just starting out but at the same time I don't want junk. I hope I posted this in the right area, any help and info is much appreciated, thank you!

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Old 05-18-2017, 03:51 PM
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You're on the right track (literally). By going to local tracks, you will have a better idea what classes are being run. You will also have a chance to see what others are running. Starting with a kit is always a good idea. Picking out what electronics you want rather than what is included in a RTR package. Who knows, maybe at one of the tracks there will be some used RCs for you to look at.

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Old 05-19-2017, 08:21 AM
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Like rusty said, figure out what classes the local tracks run for sure. Personally i recommend that people start off with a little basher and move into racing from there as having some open space to get familiar with rc driving is a huge plus, both for your wallet and for people's safety (these little cars are fast enough to hurt someone if they get out of control, also the batteries can be dangerous if not handled properly). I started with a 2wd brushless slash, which i still keep as a basher, but that won't be likely to win you any races. As far as starting with a kit or rtr is really gunna come down to your level of knowledge. The hardest decision with a kit is picking what electronics to run vs the platform. An rtr on the other hand comes out of the box ready to go but it will not be sporting the best of the best in terms of equipment (there are a few exceptions to this). If you are familiar with how to deal with the electronics then get a kit, hands down, but if you are skittish of them then get an rtr to wrench on for a while until you're feeling more bold. Welcome the forum btw! Some good guys here!

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Old 05-19-2017, 02:28 PM
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Thanks for the info, I appreciate it. I plan on going with an RTR for now just until I get more familiar with everything. From what I've been reading it seems like the Slash is the way to go for a lot of first timers. Next step is for me to check out the local tracks and shops and see what the sell and what people run and what classes are being ran. Anyway thanks again for all the help and info.

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Old 05-19-2017, 07:35 PM
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Many different ways to look at value when doing RTR vs kits. Especially when there is no class for something RTR that can be pulled off the shelf, and raced. A lot will depend on track rules and/or if they have a "run what you brung" type of class. There have been a couple of RCs, over the years, that were Ready-To-Race RTRs. They've come and gone.

Some say "RTR" stands for Ready-To-Rebuild, Ready-To-Replace, or Ready-To-Rebuy. Most of the time, mediocre RTR components are put in the package to keep the price point to a minimum...lure you in to the addiction. That's not a bad thing at all. Testing the waters, so to speak.

If a person mainly wants to "bash" and race once in a while, then RTRs have some value to them. Then you have to look at what comes within such a ready to run package. Does it really mean "ready to run", or do you have to purchase battery and charger? A RTR with a brushless system will, most likely, put you in the modified class. Figure in $35~$40 for the right wheels/tires to hook up to track conditions. After awhile, you get better at driving and skill increases. Driving on a high traction track, a stock servo may feel lethargic, or slow. In order to feel more in control with your RC, a faster servo will be needed.

If a person mainly wants to race, then I think a kit is a better value. Tons of lower priced gear that is generally very good; better than most stock RTR components. Depending on track layout, spec class racing isn't too much slower than mod classes. Lots of good reading on the subject (spec vs. mod class racing). Limiting motor power makes for some interesting things that racers do to get the most out of their RCs.

Some tracks have different rules. The last track I went to, if you won 5 races in a season (17.5T Buggy), or win 3 races in a row (17.5T Buggy), you will be bumped up to modified class the next season . That would be okay with me, cause running mod classes was a whole heck of a lot cheaper then running stock/spec class IMO. The "battery/motor/tire of week" club gets to be down right very competitive. I get it. Tweak after tweak, gram after gram, mV after mV...walking on a thin line of what's legal and what's not. It's a rush for some people.

Go have fun.

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Old 05-21-2017, 02:21 PM
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Thanks RustyUs for the info it makes sense, what are some good kits to start with brand wise? Or are they all comparable and just personal preference?
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Old 05-28-2017, 06:36 AM
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If you're serious about getting into racing, I'd look at a Team Associated Team Kit, or a Losi/TLR team kit. Probably either a buggy or short course truck. Go see what they are running at your local track.

If you're "not sure" about the hobby and/or your skills, you might want to consider getting an inexpensive RTR to "test the waters" with, and learn to drive first. Get to know an RC before you go and spend serious money on a race rig. Shoot, Dromida has decent cars for under $100. $150 for brushless. Yeah, they're small-ish (18th scale) but they're quick, and fun to learn with. Parts are cheap too. Otherwise something from ECX in the 10th scale would be a good starter.

Just realize, this ain't a cheap hobby. The purchase price is just the beginning.
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