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Rc Tricks and Tips

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Old 04-06-2008, 10:08 AM
  #1
bluecaka69
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Default Rc Tricks and Tips

Removing Paint from Lexan body

Dot-3 brake fluid from your local auto supply store makes a phenomenal cleansing bath for lexan bodies. Have a terrible paint job and want to start over again? Bathe it in this stuff overnight, and the paint will dissolve and slide right off. Be sure not to get brake fluid on clothes or carpet, and use rubber gloves while handling it.


Get your piston to BDC FAST - And EASY - Everytime : Saving your Engine From seizing on cool-down.
One you simply rotate the engine via the flywheel or pull-start until you hear or feel full compression. Some engines let out a tap sound. Some get the full compressed feel either way just listen and feel around for a bit.......then rotate it for full-compress and try a tad more and you might hear a click as it goes a bit tighter......you have found TDC. Now what you do is simply get a black marker of any kind , i try not to use permanent since the flywheel might be removed and a new mark will need to be made....so i use a water based marker. And go directly under your r/c and make a mark right in the center at the very bottom. You then rotate the flywheel over and when you see that mark at top , that means the piston is now @ BDC....which is where you always want an engine when cooling down. I also like the mark this way since you dont have to look under your vehicle to see if its at bdc , even though the filter is kinda blocking the view , looking at it from an angle you can easily distinguish if you've got it set at bdc for cool-down. This prevents your engine from getting seized as the skirt constricts on cool-down.

Or two ....which is kinda more work , but could be more exact if you dont know the tell-tale sounds and feeling of TDC. But just remove the head / heat-sink and simply eyeball it , once the piston goes as high as it can , go underneath , mark the flywheel right at the center....and your done. Then back on goes the heat-sink and your ready to run.

Then when you shut off your r/c engine, basically get down and start eyeballing and moving it towards bdc, i normally just slowly move it after tdc , cause sometimes it can spin right back up into the skirt. And once the mark is at the very top.....im done for the day.

This makes it real easy to keep track of , and you dont have to worry if you got it right. Also you want to make sure you immediately move the engine to bdc right after shutting off , the engine will start to cool the instant you shut it off. As to why this is a good thing to do , so you can quickly and easy place the piston as far away from the skirt as possible.

EXTRA TIP: This tip also is a great way to tell if your flywheel is slipping , just watch for tdc , and if the mark isnt centered at the bottom anymore....then you know youve got flywheel slip



Storing your R/C & R/C Equipment- Tips to save your r/c while its sitting around.
While your storing your r/c , for really any amount of time. You need to either take off the wheels , or support the car in the air with a stand , or anything that gets the chassis off the ground....which will then suspend the wheels in air. This will help keep the weight of the rc from warping/compressing your tires and foam inserts.

Also for a nitro engine you will want to squirt some extra after-run oil in the carb and in through the glow plug area. If you know your not going to run it for awhile. To help prevent corrosion since nitro fuel turns turns into water and will corrode your engine if you dont do this. People use quite a few different kinds of after run oils , both home-made blends of oils. Some half marvels mystery oil and a combo of other things.

You also want to watch out for nitro cleaners , they clean well of course , but they also take away the natural oils that need to be there to help prevent corrosion. So get some WD-40 (WD stands for water displacement) and use a q-tip and hit any rust prone areas........since you dont want to get any wd-40 on plastic since it will make it not as stiff and wont perform as well.

You also want to drain all fuel from the gas-tank , and fuel lines to also prevent that from sending any water vapors into the engine or pipe......again trying to prevent corrosion.


Engine Tuning and Troubleshooting

It's a fact of nitro life: sooner or later, your engine won't want to start or stay running long enough for you to get up on the drivers' stand. Don't shelve your piston-pounder and start charging batteries just yet hard-starting woes aren't usually tough to fix. Follow these steps, and you'll reach nitro nirvana again in no time.
Got pinch?
Before we start troubleshooting, let's first make sure the piston and sleeve aren't toast. Remove the engine's glow plug, and rotate the flywheel with your finger. As the piston reaches top dead center, you should at least feel resistance as the piston is “pinched” by the sleeve. This tight fit seals the combustion chamber and is critical to engine performance. If you don't feel any pinch, you probably need to replace your piston and sleeve.
Check out the glow system
Even rank novices know to check out the glow plug when starting problems occur, but few remember to check the other half of the glow system—glow starter! Make sure that your glow starter is fully charged (or has a fresh battery), and its contacts are clean. Press the glow plug into the glow starter and watch the coil it should almost instantly glow bright orange, and the entire coil should glow. If the coil glows dull red, or it doesn't glow at all (and you're certain the glow starter is charged and making good contact), you need a new plug.

If you have an electric starting system, the testing procedure is the same, but you must remember to touch the glow plug to the heat-sink head as you crank the engine if you don't, the glow plug won't light because the circuit is incomplete.

Do the tighten-up
Make sure that the engine's heat-sink head and backplate screws are fully tightened. Cinch them down in the pattern shown to ensure even tightness if you torque the screws down completely one at a time, you'll warp the parts and prevent them from sealing properly against the engine. Pull-start engines require the starter housing to be removed for backplate access be careful not to uncoil the starter spring in the process! Slip a screwdriver between the backplate and housing to prevent the spring from popping out, then tape or rubber-band the assembly after removal so it doesn't go “boing!” on your bench.

Speaking of sealing...
While you’re wrenching, take a look at the gaskets or O-rings that seal the carburetor base and backplate. If they’re damaged, replace them. A coat of Permatex Ultra Copper sealant (or similar sensor-safe automotive sealant) is also good insurance against air leaks.

Know your limits
If your engine seems to start easily enough but shuts down as soon as you let off the gas, check your idle-limit screw—the little guy just in front of the carburetor opening. Turn the screw so the carb still has a 1mm (or so) opening when full brake is applied. If the screw turns very easily, put a drop of thread-lock on it to prevent engine vibration from causing the setting to drift.

Needle needs
If you went nuts with your carb’s needle settings before your starting troubles began, you should reset them to factory specs. Lost your manual? For most engines, a good starting setup is “flush” for the low-end needle (adjust the needle so its screw head is level with the opening in the carb body the screw head sits in), and “two turns out” for the high-end needle (gently turn the needle clockwise until it bottoms out, then give it two full counterclockwise turns).

How’s that fuel tubing?
Even tiny pinhole leaks in your vehicle’s fuel and pressure lines can cause erratic engine operation and starting difficulties. When in doubt, replace the fuel tubing it’s inexpensive, and with all the color options available, it’s a cheap and easy way to give the chassis a new look.

Tanks for the memories
Your fuel tank isn't clogged, is it? Look for any crud in the tank where the fuel pickup line is, and get it out of there. Likewise, you should check your vehicle's in-line fuel filter (if so equipped) frequently it can become clogged with debris and impede fuel flow if not cleaned regularly. Finally, consider removing the tank's plunger-type primer, if so equipped such primers are prone to air leaks. After you've removed the primer, fill the hole with a machine-thread screw and some silicone sealant.

Freshen up your fuel
If your jug of fuel spent the winter on the garage floor, it has probably gone bad. Very bad. Dispose of it responsibly, and get yourself a new gallon. Store it in a cool, dry place away from sunlight and off the floor. If you like to race outside or go on extended-play missions outdoors, try to keep your fuel out of the sun and heat. Trinity's Nitro Kooler bags are the best way to prevent solar heating and protect fuel in clear containers from light exposure.

Now that you've ironed out any potential problems, you're ready for a first-pull startup. Here's how to make it happen:

1. Prime the carburetor. Remove the pressure line from the exhaust pipe, and blow into it you'll see a solid jet of fuel fill the fuel line up to the carburetor. When the fuel hits the carb, stop blowing. Reinstall the pressure line.

2. Install the glow igniter. If it's a cam-lock type, make sure it's secure. Is there a gauge on top? Make sure the needle is in the green.

3. Crack the throttle. Instead of triggering the radio, just turn the throttle-trim knob to open the carb another 1/2 millimeter or so.

4. Pull the starter cord! Give a sharp tug, and your engine should now be running. At the very least, it should pop on the first pull and start on the second or third (the extra tugs are usually only required if the carb wasn't fully primed).









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Old 04-06-2008, 05:41 PM
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

Good Post Blue....
My pet peeve is Airleaks.....Here are some words on the matter.

In order for an engine to idle, transition and tune consistently it must be airtight- airtight meaning that no air can enter the engine except through the carburetor intake. Surprisingly, even brand new out-of-the-box high-end engines can have air leaks and until these leaks are found and eliminated, the engine won't run consistently and cannot be precisely tuned. The good news is, several years ago I figured out an easy way to check for and fix air leaks. You'll need the following:
• A small glass of soapy water
• A small brush
• About a foot of fuel tubing
Step 1. Be sure that the high-speed needle is open at least two turns out and the throttle is at fully open.
Step 2. Install one end of the fuel tubing on the carburetor nipple. You're going to be blowing into the other end of the tubing to pressurize the engine crankcase.
Step 3. Place your thumb over the carburetor intake to prevent air from escaping, then blow into the fuel tubing while brushing soapy water around the base of the carburetor, on both sides of the pinch bolt, around the fuel fittings, at the high and low speed needle valves, around the front bearing and even around the back plate.If any bubbling occurs you've got an air leak. But don't be alarmed. Fixing the leak is easy and your engine will run remarkably better and more consistently when you've eliminated these leaks.

The Fix...
The most common air leaks seem to occur around the pinch bolt. Applying a dab of RTV (or silicon) over both exposed sides of the pinch bolt will fix this type of leak. RTV is also great for sealing any leaks around the base of the carburetor. Simply remove the carburetor and run a small amount of RTV around the base of the carb where the leak occurred. Reinstall the carburetor and allow the RTV to ooze out between the crankcase and the carb body. For leaks around the high-speed needle valve fittings, usually retightening the high-speed needle assembly will take care of these. Leaks directly at the high speed or low speed needle usually means there's a damaged O-ring that must be replaced. Many racers don't realize that the front bearing can leak air. That's why nearly every high-end engine uses a rubber sealed front ball bearing to not only keep out dirt, but also air. If your front bearing leaks air, it's time for a bearing replacement. This simple leak check can easily be done even when the engine is installed in a car. After you've done this test on several engines you'll be surprised of two things: first, how often unwanted air leaks occur and second, how much better your engine runs, idles and tunes when it's airtight. To run right it must be airtight!

Airtight GasTank...
The Fuel system must also be airtight. If the fuel tank, tank lid, fuel lines or filter has a leak then the same kind of tuning issues as described above will occur. While you can check the fuel system by using the same method of brushing soapy water onto the suspected offending area while blowing into the tank, I generally find it better to simply remove the tank from the car and submerse it in a sink of water while blowing into the vent line and plugging the fuel line. If bubbles are present you've got a leak. An engine at full throttle produces about 6 to 8 psi in the vent line and conversely in the tank. By blowing really hard you're also able to produce about 6 to 8 psi for a couple of seconds. If you're able to blow hard enough to cause the tank lid to open slightly and leak, it's time to replace the tank lid spring or bend more preload in the spring. The entire system (fuel tank, fuel filters, fuel lines, tank fittings, etc.) must be airtight to achieve consistent repeatable performance. I always that my fuel system is airtight when it's new but also recheck it every time I rebuild a car after a race. It easy insurance plus soapy water is a good way to thoroughly clean the tank. Just be sure it's totally dry before using it by flushing out any water left in the tank with fuel before installing it in you car.
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Old 04-11-2008, 09:32 AM
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

I'll post this in a couple places so it's easy to find. If your exhaust gasket blows out, you can use the cardboard from a case of beer, or soda to cut a new one out of. Take your time cutting it to match the header or manifold and it'll work great. It lasts quite a while too, plus it's cheaper and faster than ordering a new one. A razor blade or exacto knife works good to cut it out.
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Old 04-19-2008, 12:58 PM
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Heres a Great Tip/Trick I got from Kuppler.......It will get you runnin again while you order your replacement parts.....

If You break a Plastic Part, you can repair it with a Soldering Iron and a couple Zip ties.
Just use the soldering iron (adjust the heat to melt the plastic kind of Slowly) to melt your Plastic pieces back together.
Use the plastic Zip Tie like a welding rod, to fill in Gaps and add Material to Strengthen the Repair.
When you are done , you can take a File and clean up the repair if there are any clearance/rubbing issues.

Works Great.....
I used this trick to repair a Busted lower Rear arm, on my Viper/Volcano. It allowed me to Finish a Video for a Contest that I would have Missed if I was DOWN FOR REPAIRS.....
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Old 04-24-2008, 09:12 AM
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

these aren't Tricks but they are helpful ideas everyone should know......
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Old 04-24-2008, 10:22 AM
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THis should be a sticky.. Good info guys.
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Old 04-24-2008, 12:09 PM
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

this is something i have found that works good on metal screws going into plastic, use a dab of liquid electrical tape on the screw. it acts almost like loctite for plastic and greatly reduces the wear from removing screws over and over again.
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Old 04-24-2008, 02:08 PM
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Quote:
ORIGINAL: ranger4x4

this is something i have found that works good on metal screws going into plastic, use a dab of liquid electrical tape on the screw. it acts almost like loctite for plastic and greatly reduces the wear from removing screws over and over again.
Jay. Can we get a link to that. so some people will know what it is.. HEHE.
Thanks,
Adam
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Old 04-24-2008, 02:14 PM
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

For those of you who race, or just need good info on vehicle setup. I pulled this from another thread.

http://www.teamxray.com/teamxray/sho...p?file_id=4461
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Old 04-24-2008, 07:03 PM
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WITHOUT HAVING TO TAKE OUT THE TRANNY Here is how you get to the screws to the thing that makes it change gears, you screw it in to make it shift later, and screw it out to make it shift sooner, dont mess with the one that says this holds it in place because that is the screw that hold it on the shaft.
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Old 04-24-2008, 07:57 PM
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Quote:
ORIGINAL: Redharris

Good Post Blue....
My pet peeve is Airleaks.....Here are some words on the matter.

In order for an engine to idle, transition and tune consistently it must be airtight- airtight meaning that no air can enter the engine except through the carburetor intake. Surprisingly, even brand new out-of-the-box high-end engines can have air leaks and until these leaks are found and eliminated, the engine won't run consistently and cannot be precisely tuned. The good news is, several years ago I figured out an easy way to check for and fix air leaks. You'll need the following:
• A small glass of soapy water
• A small brush
• About a foot of fuel tubing
Step 1. Be sure that the high-speed needle is open at least two turns out and the throttle is at fully open.
Step 2. Install one end of the fuel tubing on the carburetor nipple. You're going to be blowing into the other end of the tubing to pressurize the engine crankcase.
Step 3. Place your thumb over the carburetor intake to prevent air from escaping, then blow into the fuel tubing while brushing soapy water around the base of the carburetor, on both sides of the pinch bolt, around the fuel fittings, at the high and low speed needle valves, around the front bearing and even around the back plate.If any bubbling occurs you've got an air leak. But don't be alarmed. Fixing the leak is easy and your engine will run remarkably better and more consistently when you've eliminated these leaks.

The Fix...
The most common air leaks seem to occur around the pinch bolt. Applying a dab of RTV (or silicon) over both exposed sides of the pinch bolt will fix this type of leak. RTV is also great for sealing any leaks around the base of the carburetor. Simply remove the carburetor and run a small amount of RTV around the base of the carb where the leak occurred. Reinstall the carburetor and allow the RTV to ooze out between the crankcase and the carb body. For leaks around the high-speed needle valve fittings, usually retightening the high-speed needle assembly will take care of these. Leaks directly at the high speed or low speed needle usually means there's a damaged O-ring that must be replaced. Many racers don't realize that the front bearing can leak air. That's why nearly every high-end engine uses a rubber sealed front ball bearing to not only keep out dirt, but also air. If your front bearing leaks air, it's time for a bearing replacement. This simple leak check can easily be done even when the engine is installed in a car. After you've done this test on several engines you'll be surprised of two things: first, how often unwanted air leaks occur and second, how much better your engine runs, idles and tunes when it's airtight. To run right it must be airtight!

Airtight GasTank...
The Fuel system must also be airtight. If the fuel tank, tank lid, fuel lines or filter has a leak then the same kind of tuning issues as described above will occur. While you can check the fuel system by using the same method of brushing soapy water onto the suspected offending area while blowing into the tank, I generally find it better to simply remove the tank from the car and submerse it in a sink of water while blowing into the vent line and plugging the fuel line. If bubbles are present you've got a leak. An engine at full throttle produces about 6 to 8 psi in the vent line and conversely in the tank. By blowing really hard you're also able to produce about 6 to 8 psi for a couple of seconds. If you're able to blow hard enough to cause the tank lid to open slightly and leak, it's time to replace the tank lid spring or bend more preload in the spring. The entire system (fuel tank, fuel filters, fuel lines, tank fittings, etc.) must be airtight to achieve consistent repeatable performance. I always that my fuel system is airtight when it's new but also recheck it every time I rebuild a car after a race. It easy insurance plus soapy water is a good way to thoroughly clean the tank. Just be sure it's totally dry before using it by flushing out any water left in the tank with fuel before installing it in you car.
Awesome post bro, Going to do that my my buggy's motor, And some other really good info here.. sweeetness[8D]
With Lordmik on this, Make it a stickey!
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Old 04-25-2008, 10:57 AM
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Quote:
ORIGINAL: kuppler


Quote:
ORIGINAL: ranger4x4

this is something i have found that works good on metal screws going into plastic, use a dab of liquid electrical tape on the screw. it acts almost like loctite for plastic and greatly reduces the wear from removing screws over and over again.
Jay. Can we get a link to that. so some people will know what it is.. HEHE.
Thanks,
Adam
here ya go adam one link comin up...would you like fries with that too? lol.
http://search.harborfreight.com/cpis...tape&Submit=Go
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Old 05-07-2008, 09:45 PM
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

i found this and i thought it was cool...
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Old 05-08-2008, 07:50 AM
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Quote:
ORIGINAL: kuppler

i found this and i thought it was cool...
Hey thats cool bro, Is it Me or does alot of stuff on these engines start with the letter C? LOL.. sorry.. just woke up and caught My attention[&:]
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Old 05-25-2008, 12:01 PM
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

Heres a general Handling Guide I found...

GENERAL HANDLING TIPS

Need Better Jumping
(1) If bouncing too much or bottoms out over jumps, use heavier oil and/or springs. Be careful as too stiff will cause you to lose control over rough sections.
(2) Shock Mounting - If bottoming out over jumps move lower mount towards the outside.
(3) Balance the Vehicle - Front to back weight. Balance is off.
Note: the opposite is true.

Need More Rear Traction
(1) Weight - Move weight towards the rear of the vehicle.
(2) Rear Ride Height - Lower rear ride height (lowers CGH of the vehicle)
(3) Rear Camber - Less camber (0 degree min.)
(4) Rear Shock Mounting - Move lower mount towards the outside one hole.
(5) Slipper - Loosen slipper so wheels don't spin too much.
(6) Rear Toe-in - Increase rear toe-in (2 degrees max)
Note: the opposite is true.

Need More Steering
(1) Weight - Move more weight towards the front of the vehicle.
(2) Front Shock Mounting - Move the lower shock mount towards the outside one hole.
(4) Front Ride Height - Lower the front ride height (lowers CGH)
(3) Rear Shock Mounting - Move lower mount towards inside one hole.
(5) Ackerman - Use less Ackerman for more sensitive steering (short tight turns)
(6) Rear Toe-in - Decrease rear toe-in (0 min.)
Note: the opposite is true.

Need More High Speed Steering
(1) Front Toe Adjustment - More toe-in gives you more steering coming out of the corners
(2) Rear Ride Height - Raise rear ride height for more high speed steering (raising CGH)
Note: the opposite is true.

Make Vehicle More Stable Over Rougher Tracks
(1) Rear Camber - More negative camber is more stable on bumpy tracks
(promotes straight line driving reduces steering)
(2) Front Shock Mounting - Move lower shock mount inside for bumpy tracks
(3) Check all ball-ends and wheel bearings for slop.
(4) Check pillow balls for correct adjustment and no binding
(5) Use less viscosity shock oil, which will help keep tires in contact with ground more
(6) Use lighter weight wheels & tires, reducing unsprung weight, which will help keep tires in contact with ground more
Vehicle is hard to control, especially on the straights - This is where you gotta start looking at all the small stuff. First, verify that your alignment is good for all wheels. Then move on to the other stuff. Are the ball-ends tight with no slop? Are the wheel bearings in good shape? Do you have a bent shock or a broken a-arm? Are there a few loose screws that you didn't notice? Do you have a bent wheel or a tire that has come unglued from the wheel? Is something bent or binding?

The idea of the perfect setup is a complete neutral setup, that's enough grip so you don't slide, but enough slide so you don't bog down. And the vehicle has equal grip from the front wheels to the back wheels. Also, the vehicle should be easy to control on the straights, even on a bumpy track, and should track straight when you are on full power.

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Old 05-25-2008, 12:28 PM
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Nice post Rich.....
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Old 05-27-2008, 09:42 PM
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

well i found this...

How to read your glow plug
to tell how you are runing (mixture wise)(WILL ONLY WORK WITH NEW GOLW PLUG!)

Dry(is the botem of the plug)& Gray(is the wire) = Optimal(mixture)
If the plug is looking
Wet & Shiny = Too Rich
Dry & Partly Gray = Rich
Dry & Gray = Optimal
Dry & Distorted = Lean
Dry & Broken = Too Lean, Richen up ASAP Or risk damageing your enigne.

Tuning For wether

for last time you ran to now.

eg, if it was cooler then and hoter now richen it up

CCW Counter clock wise, CW Clock wise

Air temp = Cooler CCW, Warmer CW
Humidity = Humider CCW, Dryer CW
Altitude = Low CCW, Higher CW
Nitro Content = 10-20% CW, 30-40% CCW
Oil Content = Low CCW, Higher CW
Glow plug temp = Hot CW, Cool CCW

Beter Piston & Sleve Tempering

pre heat your oven to 270 (yes 270 it is tecnicaly "over heating" but to temper it is nessiary)

when your oven is up to temp put the enigne in, but first take off your carb, all rubber O rings, exaust gasket, starter, clutch shoes... then throw it in the oven and wate for 10min (norm 1 tank run time) then take it out and start on your first tank of break in.... you alredy have a tempered engine, you will get beter life out of your engine and beter compreson....

i hope this helps...

Cam



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Old 05-27-2008, 09:45 PM
  #18
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Ok Guys…..
I have seen a Lot of folks suffering Confusion, and having Problems when breaking in an Engine. I think its time we start a Discussion on this Topic and Iron out a few guidelines for those of us that are undecided about the Best way to Break In an engine.

I will start it out with a Method that works for ME. I found this Info on the Net. It was written in an O.S. Engine forum but it applies to Us too. Here it is…

ENGINE BREAK-IN LIKE THE PROS
This was copied from a post by STEPHEN BESS on the "Starting Grid" message board as he tried to help another member get more life and performance out of his OS motor. This break-in method should apply to virtually any ABC hobby nitro engine (except for ringed engines).
If you are still idling at least a tank through during break-in, you're using the old-school accepted method (still works well for some!) but it's not the method that the top engine guys (Ron Paris, Dennis Richey, Rody Roem, Michael Salven are just a few I've spoken personally with about this) recommend anymore.
From the very 1st time you start your engine, plop the car on the ground & begin running it in a parking lot in 2-3 minute intervals, tuned only *slightly rich* getting the temps up in the 200F range on a normal day. Every 2-3 minutes, shut the engine down & let it cool completely with the piston at BDC, and then fire it back up; continue this cycle until you've run 15 min or so, and then bump up to 3-4 minute intervals. Vary the RPM and don't be afraid to get the temps in the 200's. What you want is heat cycling of the components without the incredible stress that comes with breaking an engine in when it's overly rich & cold. After cycling the engine in this mannerfor about 20-25 total minutes, it'll be ready for the track and race tuning. I realize this method goes against the old-school "idle on the box" routine, but you'll be amazed once you've completed this break-in routine, your OS will still have amazing pinch w/out sticking at the top AND your OS's compression will last far longer than it will with the "old school" method.
You say you run the engine at "factory settings" for the first FIVE tanks? That alone causes lots of stress, as the factory OS settings are very rich on every OS I've ever owned or tuned. The piston & sleeve haven't expanded to operating temps, and every time the engine turns over, the piston slams into the pinch zone at TDC. The not-so-surprising result can be a cracked con-rod at the crank pinthat's where the majority of the stresses occur as the engine turns over. I've only heard of about 6-8 OS engines breaking con-rods, and they're ALWAYS during the first gallon...and almost every time it's because the guys have performed the break-in procedure you described. Doesn't seem like a mystery as to why it's happening. Drawing out the break-in routine really stresses the engine & actually wears away compression along the way. This method I've outlined will feel weird at every step, but after you try it once, you'll notice a big difference in your engine's performance & lifespan.
Hope this helps; give this break-in method a shotyou have nothing to gain except longer life & more power
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Old 05-27-2008, 10:08 PM
  #19
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

Differentials:

Differential fluids are just like shock fluids in that the
larger the number the thicker/heavier the fluid

Front: Thinner/lighter fluid in the front differential increases off-power steering. You must be careful not to
go too light as the steering will become grabby and inconsistent. If you experience this go one step heavier.
In general, thicker/heavier front differential fluid increases off-power stability and increases on-power steering.

Center: Using thinner/lighter fluid in the center differential tends to make the model easier to drive on
rough and slick tracks but allows it to unload easier under acceleration and provides less forward drive.
Thicker/heavier center differential fluids offer better acceleration, increased on-power steering and less
off-power steering. In general, using thicker center differential fluid is better on high bite and smooth tracks.

Rear: Using thinner/lighter fluid in the rear differential provides more corning traction and increases steering
response in the middle of the turn. Thicker/heavier fluids in the rear differential provide less steering in
the middle of the turn but greater forward traction.

Ackerman:
This is the name given to the type of geometry needed to maintain the difference in the angles
of the inside and outside wheels necessary for each front tire to maintain the proper turning radius. Since
the inside tire must run a smaller radius than the outside tire this is critical.
The Long Ackerman plate will have smoother steering and is generally more forgiving.
The Short Ackerman plate produces a quicker reaction and steering response and has more steering in the
middle of the turn. The short Ackerman plate would be better suited for tight technical tracks.

Bump steer: is the side-to-side movement of the front wheels that can be caused by the suspension moving
up and down.
Down: Running the bump steer ball in the “down” position , will produce smoother steering in the
middle of the turn.
Up: Running the bump steer ball in the “up” position , will increase the steering in the middle of
the turn.

Less anti-squat: will produce less off-power steering and allow the chassis
to roll (side to side) more across the rear. Less anti-squat will help the chassis
accelerate better in small bumps.

More anti-squat: will produce more roll resistance (side to side), increase
steering in the middle of the turn and be better on rough tracks with big
jumps

Droop
Droop is the amount of suspension downward travel
from ride height. Always measure the droop of the
with the shocks on the model. Measure from
the center of the top shock mount to the center of
the bottom shock screw. More droop
(travel) in the front will have more on-power steering
and allow the truck to roll more on the rear when on
throttle. More rear droop: will increase off-power
steering and allow the truck to roll over on the front
while off-power. More front and rear droop: will accelerate better in bumps when going straight, but can
cause the truck to traction roll in rough turns. Less front and rear droop: will make the chassis slide over
bumps better in turns but limit acceleration in the bumps.

Ride Height: is the level of the chassis above the track surface as it sits on its suspension. As the chassis sits
on a flat surface measure up to the bottom face of the chassis. You will want to adjust the front of the
chassis with 27mm of ride height and 28mm in the rear. We have found the most models handle best when the
front ride height is 1mm to 2mm lower and no more than level with the rear of the chassis.
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Old 05-28-2008, 08:56 AM
  #20
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

A lil simply tip is to put some Foam padding in your battery bod to help it from not moving around. ill take pics later to show.....
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Old 05-28-2008, 11:24 AM
  #21
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

heres some mnore little trick that you may come in handy some time also some other stuff you may nee to know
I dont take credit for any of these they were all out of a magazine
sorry writing is small










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Old 05-28-2008, 11:53 AM
  #22
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

That tire balancing trick is confusing, and if interpreted incorrectly (or not at all) you might be tempted to think that the article was telling you to put the putty at the BOTTOM of the wheel, not at the top. Obviously this is wrong - the heavy part is already on the bottom, so adding more weight there is stupid.

-

One trick I just came up with on our non-adjustable differentials: If you want a bit more of the "limited slip" action and heavier grease isn't doing the trick for you, slide a piece of fuel tubing onto the shaft that the bevel spider gears ride on, in between the gears. The longer you make this fuel tube (which presses the two gears into the case and provides friction between the gear and the tube) the more locked up the diff will be. The side gears may also squeeze the fuel tube between the shaft and the gear, further increasing the internal friction. On my Volcano, a piece of tubing 1/2" pretty much locked the diff, and a piece 7/16" stiffens it up so much that the turning radius suffers, but the grip in the rear is improved dramatically. I don't know how long it'll last because whenever side-to-side wheel speed varies, the gears may chew up the fuel tube. It's fun to play with, though.

And I MIGHT be wrong, but I've been going about pulling the differentials the hard way: I'm thinking that if you pull off the bumper, you should have full access to the 5 screws that mount the differential cover, and by pulling these 5 screws you should be able to remove the cover (and access the differential inside) without pulling the whole rear suspension apart. I saw this trick in the Monsoon thread, but it might apply to the 1/10 scale trucks as well. I haven't tried it yet, but in tinkering with the "fuel tube locker" I don't see why it wouldn't work. It won't give you better access to the pinion or the grub screw, but you can at least play with the diff this way.
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Old 05-29-2008, 07:47 PM
  #23
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

These are All Useful Tips guys.....
Good Work....Keep em Comming....
Here is another...

Another Use for Baking Soda...
This tip is for stripped out holes in plastic parts.
First remove the screw from the stripped hole.
Take baking soda and fill the hole. Once hole is filled,
put one or two drops of CA glue on the hole filled with baking soda.
Once glue is dry, take a small drill bit (just slightly smaller than the screw)
and drill out the hole. You are now ready with a new, perfect non stripped hole for your screw.
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Old 06-06-2008, 11:45 PM
  #24
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

To prevent your engine mount screws from pulling through the chassis aluminum from vibration (first pic), add some large diameter washers under the heads of the screws (second pic). This spreads the stress over a larger area. I used zinc plated washers from McMaster Carr item # 91100A120 3.2mm ID 9mm OD $1.07 for 100 (plus shipping). You could use a bigger washer and grind the edges if necessary to get them to fit in the recessed area of the chassis.
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Old 06-06-2008, 11:55 PM
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Default RE: Rc Tricks and Tips

a couple good links with info for how to dye you rims - including chrome - i tried it with good results - it was easy and really can make some cool stuff

[link=http://www.rpmrcproducts.com/faq/dye.htm]http://www.rpmrcproducts.com/faq/dye.htm[/link]
[link=http://www.rpmrcproducts.com/faq/dyepg2.htm]http://www.rpmrcproducts.com/faq/dyepg2.htm[/link]

a thread about my first efforts

[link=http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/m_7486066/tm.htm]http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/m_7486066/tm.htm[/link]
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