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Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

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Old 05-21-2010, 02:04 PM
  #1  
grimgard
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Default Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

I am new to drifting and wanted to get your guys opinions. I already havea sprint 2 flux brushless car and was wondering if it would make a good drifter? It look identical to the sprint 2 drift except for the Tires, body, and brushless motor/ESc.

I did order some ABS tires and new body but they are in the mail still. I read that some people leave the rear unlocked, some loc kthem some use a one way differental up front and so on.

I figures I'll try it stock with the new tires and see how it goes from there.

Thanks for the tips/advice in advance.
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Old 05-21-2010, 05:21 PM
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kstmRYD
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

I've been drifting a sprint 2 for over 5 years now, others are going to hate this [:@] but it was not designed for drifting, it's a tour chassis, HPI slipped on drift tires and made it a drifter. The weight distribution of this chassis from left to right is fantastic but front to rear is the problem. She tends to whip her butt out. Now this may not be a bad thing if you learn to keep her under control, for this reason I recommend a lipo battery in it.

I love this chassis, I use it on larger layouts but will not use it in competitions on tight track as very good throttle control is needed, so I use my other chassis. I have a front one way and a lock rear, this combo allows me to switch here back and forth on a dime. If you stick with this chassis you will definitely become a good drifter.

Tires are key in drifting, but also your gearing, power and driving style. What works for others may not work for you, so you need to try different compounds for different surfaces. ABS will be the slipperiest and harder to control, they are dirt cheap but the also wear down really fast on asphalt. A poly tire gives a really good slip/grip ratio. Drift tires that have a rubber compound are for nitro or what I call "basher" drifting - driving really fast and sliding all over the place just for fun. If you want to become a good drifter and drift tandems and in control rubber compounds will not work.

So for your sprint, put the ABS on keep the throttle in control and practice, practice, practice!
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Old 05-21-2010, 05:42 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

Ive left my rear diff stock and this thing will turn around within the size of its own dimensions no joke i love this chassis its fast and has a great turn around time well mine does anyways
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Old 05-21-2010, 07:27 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting


ORIGINAL: kstmRYD

I've been drifting a sprint 2 for over 5 years now, others are going to hate this [:@] but it was not designed for drifting, it's a tour chassis, HPI slipped on drift tires and made it a drifter. The weight distribution of this chassis from left to right is fantastic but front to rear is the problem. She tends to whip her butt out. Now this may not be a bad thing if you learn to keep her under control, for this reason I recommend a lipo battery in it.

I love this chassis, I use it on larger layouts but will not use it in competitions on tight track as very good throttle control is needed, so I use my other chassis. I have a front one way and a lock rear, this combo allows me to switch here back and forth on a dime. If you stick with this chassis you will definitely become a good drifter.

Tires are key in drifting, but also your gearing, power and driving style. What works for others may not work for you, so you need to try different compounds for different surfaces. ABS will be the slipperiest and harder to control, they are dirt cheap but the also wear down really fast on asphalt. A poly tire gives a really good slip/grip ratio. Drift tires that have a rubber compound are for nitro or what I call ''basher'' drifting - driving really fast and sliding all over the place just for fun. If you want to become a good drifter and drift tandems and in control rubber compounds will not work.

So for your sprint, put the ABS on keep the throttle in control and practice, practice, practice!
Well mine is just collecting dust on the shelf so I figure it would be cheeper than buying a new RC. How did you lock your rear diffs? I see HPI sells a front one way diff.. BTW what is a one way diff? Thanks for your help.
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Old 05-21-2010, 07:36 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

Puts more power going forward (One-Way)->
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Old 05-21-2010, 07:41 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting


ORIGINAL: leadfootdriver

Puts more power going forward (One-Way)->
Could you elaborte just a little? Remember I am new to all of this. So you get more power going forward left or right? and how does this help you?
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Old 05-21-2010, 08:13 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

Well with the stock diffs you get equal amounts of speed going forward or in reverse well with the front one-way it puts more power going forward you'll see the difference for yourself if you get that part and you go slower in reverse
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Old 05-21-2010, 08:40 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

Huh [sm=confused.gif]

A one way diff only rotates in one direction.
So you will get drive to that axle but you won't have braking or reverse to what ever axle the one way diff is installed on.


As an example if you were to install a one-way diff to the front (obviously the most common application for drifting) then the front would act exactly the same as with a stock diff until you applied the brakes.
When you apply the brakes the front wheels will not be affected at all.

It's effectively like putting on the handbrake as you'd only get braking to the rear wheels.

Likewise if you were to reverse you would only get reverse drive to the front wheels as the one-way diff in the front would simply free spin.



One-way diffs are popular in drifting, but for me i really do not like them.
They give you very poor control under braking (for the reasons mentioned above) they also act like a spool or locked diff under certain circumstances as well, so they can and do cause understeer.


My advice would be to leave the front diff standard, lock the rear or fit a spool diff, fit HPI T-Drifts and you then have an excellent drifting RC car.
Really have no idea what kstmRYD is talking about, touring cars make fantastic drifters, [sm=thumbup.gif]




Cheers
Mark
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Old 05-21-2010, 10:01 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

ORIGINAL: cbr6fs

Huh [sm=confused.gif]

A one way diff only rotates in one direction.
So you will get drive to that axle but you won't have braking or reverse to what ever axle the one way diff is installed on.


As an example if you were to install a one-way diff to the front (obviously the most common application for drifting) then the front would act exactly the same as with a stock diff until you applied the brakes.
When you apply the brakes the front wheels will not be affected at all.

It's effectively like putting on the handbrake as you'd only get braking to the rear wheels.

Likewise if you were to reverse you would only get reverse drive to the front wheels as the one-way diff in the front would simply free spin.



One-way diffs are popular in drifting, but for me i really do not like them.
They give you very poor control under braking (for the reasons mentioned above) they also act like a spool or locked diff under certain circumstances as well, so they can and do cause understeer.


My advice would be to leave the front diff standard, lock the rear or fit a spool diff, fit HPI T-Drifts and you then have an excellent drifting RC car.
Really have no idea what kstmRYD is talking about, touring cars make fantastic drifters, [sm=thumbup.gif]




Cheers
Mark

Thanks for clearing that up! Please excuse my ignorance but what are HPI T-drifts Thanks for your help. **EDIT** a google search found that they are tyres! lol. I ordered some 26mm ABs ones from Ebay. Thanks.
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Old 05-22-2010, 12:42 AM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

touring cars make fantastic touring cars, it is what it is. I'm not knocking the sprint 2, just comparing it to real drift chassis and hands down it's not a drift chassis. Will it drift, hell yea! but a good drifter could drift a brick, but why show up to a gun fight with a knife?

My point is in comparison to drift chassis it lacks, yes put slippery tires on it and you will spin. Control your drifts with precision to tag a flag with the quarter panel, or enter in and out of point box on an apex at a 45 degree, you need a tuned drift chassis for this. Can you do it with a sprint 2? Yes, but you have to work your butt off trying to do it, and the margin for error just increased a hundred fold. I must add also that there are some drift chassis out there that are horrible and you are better off with a sprint 2.

If you have not drifted competitively and own several other well known drift chassis you cannot possibly know the difference. Put yourself in a competition with a sprint 2 against a dozen other drift designed chassis and see how difficult it is chasing a yokomo in a synchronized tandem.

Like I said sprint 2 is a great car, I'm not knocking it our discouraging anyone from getting one or converting it to a drifter, I drift one myself, but if you ever want to take your drifting to competitive levels, you need equipment that will give you the edge and no one chassis holds that title, yet. That is why you need several cars tuned differently.

Oh yea, on the one way diff, It will not "act exactly the same as with a stock diff until you apply the brakes" no idea what cbr6fs is talking about - a one way gives equal power to both wheels under power at any rpm under any road condition or tire slippage, your diff in the sprint uses planetary gears which do not give equal power and the same holds true for a spool, these two designs are "limited slip" diffs - best suited for stability either coming out of a curve into a straight away under power and vise versa, this is what you want in touring, it promotes traction as wheel travel distance is different in a curve, inner wheel traveling less than outer wheel, so they are designed to give some slippage so as not to loose traction - not what you want in drifting, especially in a switchback.

So, can you drift it? probably Can you drift it under complete control? probably not, but that is what we aim for.

Here is my sprint 2 (supra right side) going head to head with a yokomo in a tandem, about two-three inches apart - notice the yellow car in the back who spun out, it was a nicely tuned tamiya chassis, the trigger finger was not



kstmRYD - raikou drift team
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Old 05-22-2010, 01:03 AM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

Nice picture! I am just getting some use out of a RC that was sitting on my shelf collecting dust. I plan on having fun with it and that is about it. Thanks for the tips.
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Old 05-22-2010, 04:43 AM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

grimgard,

No worries.
We've all been there [sm=thumbs_up.gif]

kstmRYD,

Your post really does not make much sense i think your getting confused as the sprint does not use a Planetary gear system in any way-shape-or-form.

The stock diff is a ball diff simple as.
The one way simply uses 2 one-way bearings, it's either driving both wheels at the same axle speeds or it's not driving them, again simple as.


Is the Sprint a half decent drifter = Yep
Is it the best out there = Nope
Do touring cars make excellent drifters = Hell yes

Buy a top notch touring chassis and if you have the skills you'll be able to win any championship.
There's really no difference between a top spec touring car chassis and a drift spec'd chassis.

The "drift spec'd" chassis your currently seeing ar simply rehashed touring car layouts that use 90% of the exact same components used on the companies TC's.

End of the day if you want to adjust your cars weight bias, buy some weights and start testing [sm=thumbs_up.gif]


Ohhh btw
I do compete, i do have several cars in my collection and i've driven pretty much every half decent chassis out there [sm=thumbs_up.gif]
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Old 05-22-2010, 08:41 AM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

cbr6fs Ok I'm sorry but your wrong
The stock diff is a ball diff simple as.
The one way simply uses 2 one-way bearings, it's either driving both wheels at the same axle speeds or it's not driving them, again simple as.
The stock diffs are not ball diff's Ive seen the insides plenty of times to know that there are absolutely no balls inside that diif there are 4 bevel gears one pin and 2 e-clips only and how the front one-way works no one knows but there anrnt any bearing in it either
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Old 05-22-2010, 09:03 AM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

kstmRYD this is a planetary gearing system: an outer gear that revolves about a central sun gear of an epicyclic train
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Old 05-22-2010, 11:25 AM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

No confusion here - The HPI diff has two "spyder" (this is one of several names used for the gears) gears rotating around the input gear, hence they are planetary gears. Leadfootdriver is also correct, it's not a ball diff either. A ball diff is what the name implies, ball bearing in the gear riding between slip plates, all under spring tension and adjustable for plus or minus traction.

spyder gears in the HPI Diff - not a single ball in here, if you find a ball in here, you have a problem!

Hope these pictures make sense.



Here is a ball diff



The two above diff systems compensate for inner and outer wheel travel difference in a turn, they are are designed for traction, that is why drifters tighten a ball diff to eliminate this effect.

You can lock the HPI diff with this, or you can fill the diff case with hot glue shutting the gears.


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Old 05-22-2010, 11:30 AM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

cbr6fs-

Here is the difference clearly between a drift spec chassis and a touring chassis. The most dominant touring chassis that is very common that I have seen people using is a ta-05 but most of the time it is converted with a drift spec conversion. The TC series and MR-4TC are basically close in comparison but here is the difference... 1. The TC series does not sell modifications that are user friendly with drifting, it was sole designed to be a touring car. How do I know this I owned and drifted an associated TC4 for 2 years, now I currently run a Yokomo. The TC4 can be tuned to become a fine drifter but it requires modding... why go through the headache? The honest fact is that drift spec chassises are tailored more to drifting, why? The reason being that the company who makes the chassis also comes out with many modifications and parts that are tailored toward drifting. Take for instance Yokomo, if you have ever looked into there parts list you will see that they sell a vast amount of parts, modifications, and upgrades for drifting. Just so it sounds like it isn't yokomo only, hot bodies also sells many parts for the TC-D that are tailored to a full drifting experience ( they are even releasing a counter steer kit for it ). Even Tamiya is starting to catch up with the trend, certain companies have taken tamiya chassises into consideration and started producing Counter Steering kits for them.

The next most popular thing right now is Counter Steering, it offers a more realistic drift experience. Honestly I have looked into the HPI Sprint 2, I know a couple of people who own them but the fact is that HPI is dropping the ball on releasing drift modifications for this chassises. They had a good following but other companies are starting to surpass them in the avenues of drifting. Honestly they haven't even changed there chassis for the longest time being, just think about.

Tamiya: Has released various drift cars, tb-02d, tt-01, tb-03d, ta-05 ( which is touring but being tuned to drifting by people ), and they are releasing their new highend drift chassis. The ta-05 can be counter steered and so can the tt-01.

Yokomo: Drift Package, Drift Master, D-Max, Type C. All these chassises can be converted to Counter Steer

HPI: Sprint 2...... Can be counter steered but with other various different parts, I think the term is mutting a car.. Sorry Im not sure what the saying is.

I don't dislike HPI, I agree every car has its own advantages but to be honest the Sprint 2 wasn't built to be a drifter. Now what I find amazing is the amount of work certain people do to there Sprint 2 to make it an amazing drifter. I even know people who have modified that car into a Counter Steer set-up, so nothing is impossible. With a lot of the work the Sprint 2 can keep up with the other " Drift Spec " cars. HPI is a very popular car because of the easy accessibility to parts, the chassises, and they mass produce the car.

So you said there is no difference between the touring chassises and drift chassises but obviously there is. An out of the box touring car ( with drift tires ) will not drift as admirable as an out of the box " Drift Spec ". Plain and simple, you may want to dispute this fact but everyone is intitled to their own opinion so this one is mine. I noticed you mentioned you have drifted half the chassises out there... if you did you should be able to see the distinction between all the chassises. Unless your Sprint 2 is able to mimic and copy the same performance as every other chassises out there? If so that is simply amazing. I have drifted many fine tuned chassises and can tell certain clear minor distinctions between them in performance. Ever chassis though can be workable and tuned to become an excelling drifting car.

I commend you for giving your opinion and contributing to the drifting community.
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Old 05-22-2010, 11:42 AM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting



i assume people are saying they have a bevel gear differential?


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Old 05-22-2010, 12:51 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting


ORIGINAL: kstmRYD

No confusion here - The HPI diff has two ''spyder'' (this is one of several names used for the gears) gears rotating around the input gear, hence they are planetary gears. Leadfootdriver is also correct, it's not a ball diff either. A ball diff is what the name implies, ball bearing in the gear riding between slip plates, all under spring tension and adjustable for plus or minus traction.

spyder gears in the HPI Diff - not a single ball in here, if you find a ball in here, you have a problem!

Hope these pictures make sense.



Here is a ball diff



The two above diff systems compensate for inner and outer wheel travel difference in a turn, they are are designed for traction, that is why drifters tighten a ball diff to eliminate this effect.

You can lock the HPI diff with this, or you can fill the diff case with hot glue shutting the gears.


Where can I find that HPI locker and will it drop into my rear diff on my sprint 2 flux? Thanks.
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Old 05-22-2010, 02:07 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

[/color]GROUP HUG! Now we got the "what drifts better or not" argument out of the way lets focus on the task at hand and that is helping me! While you guys were debating the technical aspects of drifting I was in my work shop tearing down the rear differentials and appling some hot glue. Everything is back together (except 4 screws, 2 whashers, and some aluminum plates......[X(] lol JK! ) and I am still waiting for my tyres (if your English) tires (if your american) and body to show up. I ended up getting the HPI Toyota body and after reading I find out it will be hard to find light buckets for this body. Anyone have a good subsitute? or idea? I do not want to make holes in the body to mount the LED's so that is out of the question.

Here is a link to the body I picked [link]http://www.hpiracing.com/products/en/17524/[/link] and a picture
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Old 05-22-2010, 07:46 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

Grimgard-

Glad to see you have some humor

Lets see... For the yokomo soarer they have light buckets.. here is the link:
http://www.rc-race-and-drift-japan.c...roducts_id=978

You may need to do some slight modding in order for them to fit in, I know it should be able to work if you know what you are doing. Some people I know have been able to do this modification to there cars such as in HPI Levin, Silvia, etc. This is a reason why I stay awake from HPI bodies, they are very soft and can't sustain hits well but the cost is agreeable. There bodies barely cost anything at all, but sadly they don't make lights buckets here in the states for it. Just for future reference if you get the HPI Silvia s15, HPI Japan sells the light buckets for that car and also the HPI JZX100 Mark II Chaser.. the only problem is they are very difficult to find now. Happy Modding!

To answer your other question on the diff locks please check www.towerhobbies.com I hear a lot of people order from them. Here is the link:
http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXVGX4&P=7

I hope everything works out for you, Happy Drifting!


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Old 05-22-2010, 10:10 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting


ORIGINAL: KintoJin

Grimgard-

Glad to see you have some humor [img][/img]

Lets see... For the yokomo soarer they have light buckets.. here is the link:
http://www.rc-race-and-drift-japan.c...roducts_id=978

You may need to do some slight modding in order for them to fit in, I know it should be able to work if you know what you are doing. Some people I know have been able to do this modification to there cars such as in HPI Levin, Silvia, etc. This is a reason why I stay awake from HPI bodies, they are very soft and can't sustain hits well but the cost is agreeable. There bodies barely cost anything at all, but sadly they don't make lights buckets here in the states for it. Just for future reference if you get the HPI Silvia s15, HPI Japan sells the light buckets for that car and also the HPI JZX100 Mark II Chaser.. the only problem is they are very difficult to find now. Happy Modding!

To answer your other question on the diff locks please check www.towerhobbies.com I hear a lot of people order from them. Here is the link:
http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXVGX4&P=7

I hope everything works out for you, Happy Drifting!


Thanks for the links and advice! I'll just take a dremel to the ligh buckets and grind them down untill they fit and then epoxy them into place! I'll post pictures when I am done.
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Old 05-23-2010, 10:21 AM
  #22  
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

Great debate guys no hard feeling I hope lolz glad you got helped grimgard
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Old 05-23-2010, 12:31 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

Never any hard feelings, we all learn from what "everyone" brings to the table in these forums! I apologize to anyone if the written words may sound harsh or cocky, that is not the intent, sometimes what we write down does not come off the way it would sound if we were speaking.

With much respect to all!
ksyRYD
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Old 05-23-2010, 08:10 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

Never any hard feelings, only careful consideration and advice
Everyone has there way of speaking but in the end we all are willing to help
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Old 05-23-2010, 08:11 PM
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Default RE: Sprint 2 Flux New to drifting

Look forward to your modification grimgard, hope all goes well.
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