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What computer do i buy to get real flight to work?

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What computer do i buy to get real flight to work?

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Old 06-16-2019, 06:17 AM
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Default What computer do i buy to get real flight to work?

I don't care what brand name just needs correct specs.
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Old 06-16-2019, 08:22 AM
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I would take the specs to a local computer store. They can set you up.
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Old 06-16-2019, 08:46 AM
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Thanks..
tried that ..
There lost
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Old 06-23-2019, 11:49 PM
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What's your budget?
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Old 06-23-2019, 11:57 PM
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Wow I would think anything sold today with windows 10 would work as long as it had enough memory I have a little 300 dollar Asus notebook with a cheap integrated video card and it runs ok. My other laptop is an older full size Asus and it runs fine on Windows 7.

Dennis
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Old 06-24-2019, 02:41 PM
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nice
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Old 07-06-2019, 07:02 PM
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All that really matters is processor speed, amount of memory, and video card performance. I use Tom's Hardware guide when I need to buy components or upgrades. Use Real Flight's "recommended" specs as your minimum if you want to turn on all the visual features. It's easy enough to buy a pre-built system and then add another memory stick and a hopped up video card.
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Old 07-09-2019, 03:09 AM
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What Jester said. Or, build your own. It's easy enough. I go here to find my parts. Parts Picker The plus is the web site will tell you if something you've picked won't work with the other stuff you picked. A decent mother board will have a decent video built into it. There are also places that will custom build the machine for you but I don't have one handy right now.

You want a decent reputable mother board. I currently run a Gigabyte board. Been great! The fastest processor you can afford along with the most RAM. 16 gig minimum but 32 or even 64 is nicer. Solid state hard drives are faster, cooler and quieter. Water cooled CPU is not necessary but is a plus. And get a power supply rated about 50% more than what your machine needs. 750 watt minimum. The biggest fail point in store bought machines is the power supply. To save money they put in the smallest generic units they can get away with. A bigger quality supply works less, generates less heat and will last a long time.

And go with a mid or full tower case. Tiny cases run hotter and heat is your enemy. I have 7 fans and water cooled CPU in a mid tower case not 2 feet from me. I can't hear a thing from it. It's been happy as a clam for 3 years now.
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Old 07-09-2019, 07:31 AM
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I think a little differently about building a computer than that. I build to the specs that I need. If the processor and video card I choose needs 600w, then a 750w power supply makes sense. But if they only need 400w, I can spend that money somewhere else. If the programs I want to run need the power of a water cooled processor and video card, then I'll get it. Real Flight doesn't, as a standard air cooled system without overclocking can give 60 fps with everything turned up if you buy the right stuff.
I do agree on memory- more is always better. That's not only true for performance, but also stability. That said, there's no good reason to go overboard; if you need 32 GB I wouldn't advise buying 128.
Like any other machine, a computer should be built for the job you want it to do. That means checking the specs of the most demanding program you plan to run during the lifetime of the system and choosing components accordingly.
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Old 07-14-2019, 03:42 AM
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Originally Posted by jester_s1 View Post
I think a little differently about building a computer than that. I build to the specs that I need. .................................................. ....
That's fine IF you have a different machine for everything. Me? I have only a few machines. My main one, the one that use to be my main one and a laptop. And I expect them to last me a while. Number 2 must be 8-10 years old now and going strong.

So you can build to specs for one thing. Then build another or upgrade for the next set of specs for whatever. And so on. Or you can build the best you can afford and do it once.

And I'll admit, for me the water cooling was something of an experiment. But it's neat, a learning experience and adds just that much more insurance for just a little cost.

And the real plus to building your own is YOU install the software. So you don't get all the extra crap the manufacturers like to add on. I pick my OS, virus, security and other software packages and you won't find anything extra on my machines.
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Old 07-14-2019, 01:37 PM
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When I build a system, I define the specs I need to include anticipated future use. Sure, I could try to future proof the system by *****g out everything. That'll cost about $3000 which will depreciate to $200 in 5 years. Alternately, I can spend about $700 to build what I really need, then sell it for $200 in 3 years to build another $700 system that matches the performance of the $3000 system from 3 years earlier. It'll also have the added benefit of mature technology and bugs already worked out of the new hardware. Given that I don't often know what specs I'll actually need in 5 years, building for current needs with some headroom seems to be the wiser route.
For a real world example, the video card on my 5 year old PC died about 2 months ago. When I bought it, it was a $150 card. I spent $55 to replace it with a 1 generation newer card. IIRC, I had looked at that one when I built the computer and saw a $300 price. Had I maxed out the specs on my computer when I built it, that $300 would be gone with no real world performance benefit as the card I had was good enough.
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Old 07-14-2019, 02:51 PM
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You realize you've said pretty much the same thing I did?

I don't expect anyone to throw 3 grand at a new system. Unless they simply want to. I myself don't recall spending more than 1500 on a machine I built. Current one I believe was 1200. But I do build beyond my current requirements. Mainly because you never know what tomorrow may bring. But also with some 46 years of electronic communications maintenance behind me, I might have a clue to common weak points in many systems. Including that box you hold at the flying field.
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Old 07-15-2019, 03:44 PM
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I understood you to be saying to max out whatever you can, consider using watercooling to improve performance, and get the best components that one can afford. If that's not what you meant, then I misunderstood you.
My counterpoint was to not try and max out anything unless it's required, but rather build to the needed specs that could include future needs if known. That's not saying the same thing.
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Old 07-18-2019, 03:28 AM
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You seem concerned with what it's worth a year or two down the road. Why? If you need a machine for a purpose, the goal isn't future value but rather longevity and future functionality. Or has your cell phone contract trained you to swap out everything electronic every two years? I run a machine until it no longer works. Until 2 years ago I had a 386 DX40 working as my Honey Pot. I couldn't begin to tell you how many machines I've stripped and donated to recycling charities. Hard drives get destroyed however. Disassembled and the platters taken to the range.

So what is Real Flight? A GAME! So build a basic gaming system. (Alternatively a multi media system works too) Surprisingly a game system works well for a lot of other uses too. And you can build decent gamers for anything from 600 to 1500. But you don't need separate video or audio unless you're some kind of techno media geek. A decent MB from a reputable manufacturer will probably have video and audio that will handle RF for versions to come. A bigger power supply won't work as hard and therefore will last much longer if not forever. And the price doesn't go up significantly for that. Unless you want the 30 dollar PS from the bargain bin. Then you get what you pay for.

With the MB however, set your budget and buy the best CPU and most RAM you can afford. And keep in mind, heat kills these things to include the PS. So make sure you pack it all in a small case with no fans and hide it all in a closet surrounded by your other junk. (Sarcasm alert)

16 years on the IT contract directly supporting a government facility in the IC with over 200 servers, 5000 desktops, 35 firewalls and fiber measured in miles. Over 30,000 (yes, 30 thousand) e-mail accounts on just one of over 200 networks and systems in the facility. The Dell desktops were replaced every two years yet the primary hardware failure was......Power Supplies.

Last edited by BarracudaHockey; 07-18-2019 at 04:16 AM.
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Old 07-18-2019, 04:19 AM
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Real Flight X needed a gaming nerd system to run right, but most other sims will run on any decent PC or laptop.
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Old 07-19-2019, 03:08 AM
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What are the System Requirements for RF-X?

Minimum Recommended System

  • Operating System: Windows 7, 8.x, or 10 64 bit (Local administrator access required)
  • Processor:
    • Quad-core processor
    • AMD FX-4300 or equivalent
  • Graphics:
    • DirectX 11 Mid-Range Video Card with 2 GB of video memory
    • NVIDIA GTX 460 or better
    • Integrated graphics are not recommended
  • Hard Drive Space: 30 GB
  • System Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Installation: Internal or External DVD Drive (A downloadable alternative to the installation disk is not available)

Optimal System

  • Processor: Intel Core i7-6700
  • Graphics: NVIDIA GTX 1060, Radeon RX 480, or equivalent
  • System Memory: 32 GB RAM
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Old 07-19-2019, 03:14 AM
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That web site I posted before also lists proven builds and current price. You can see their Gaming builds here: Game Builds

You can see new builds run anywhere from $600 on up. I'd look at something in the 1000 - 1600 range and see how it's specs compare to what RF wants.

Whatever you do, don't just arbitrarily grab one that "looks" nice and is "priced right". You have to do some research and make sure you know what you need and what you're getting. This holds true for the ones in the local store too.
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