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Spektrum radio Spoilerons setup question

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Old 03-01-2015, 01:53 PM
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JMCHASE
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Default Spektrum radio Spoilerons setup question

My kit calls for spoilerons i have dual aileron servos spektrum dx6 new one... Receiver spektrum Is ar610 I
don't have any setup instructions in the manual . Kunai by Great Planes sailplane
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Old 03-02-2015, 02:05 PM
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Hi,
From nikos13s in the land of the 300

Here it is:

1: On the SETUP SCREEN, select WINGTAILMIX, then ACTivate DUALAILE
2: On the ADJUST SCREEN, select DIFFERENTIAL, then whatever differential value is appropriate (say 50%)
3: On the ADJUST SCREEN, select MIX1, ACTivate it, select THRO master channel, FLAP slave channel, appropriate values for L and R (say 100%), and SWITCH set to FLAP. This allows the throttle stick to move both ailerons in the same direction.
4: On the ADJUST SCREEN, select MIX2, ACTivate it, select THRO master channel, ELEV slave channel, appropriate values for L and R (say 30%), and SWITCH set to FLAP. This makes automatic corrections to the elevator due to spoileron/flaperon movements.

And you're done: now when the Flap switch is On, the throttle stick will have proportional control over the flaperon/spoileron values, with appropriate elevator correction. Looking at the MONITOR screen one can see that this indeed works. You could adjust throttle travel range so you have only spoilerons, only flaperons, one more than another, and so on. In particular, you could also set either L or R in MIX1 to 0% to completely disable half of the throttle range, effectively disabling either flaperon (most likely) or spoileron altogether.
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Old 03-03-2015, 08:51 AM
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Thanks Ill try this in the next few days.
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Old 03-03-2015, 08:27 PM
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Cool

From a radio set-up point of view, flapperons and spoilerons are the same thing, just a different name. That may help.
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Old 03-04-2015, 07:00 AM
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Thanks,,, i was reading another post where the flaperons were set for a negative travel insted of down plus percent the travel was set for minus 100?
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Old 03-04-2015, 08:58 AM
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In most computer radios, there is a mix called flapperons. This is used when there are no flaps on the plane and you would like to be able to offset the ailerons to provide some flap effect. This is especially true when the ailerons are full span, which is common on discus launched gliders but also occurs on other aircraft.

If you offset them downward they are called flapperons. If you offset them upward then they are called spoilerons but you will never see a mix called spoileron.

Same is true for flap to elevator mix. This is a compensation mix that adds some down elevator when you apply the flaps to keep the plane from stalling. You can also use this mix if you move the flaps or the ailerons up into a spoileron configuration. Here you would usually have up elevator but it varies by aircraft. You will not likely see a spoiler or spoileron to elevator mix listed in your manual Just the opposite use of the mix.


This is a write-up I did that you may find helpful.


THE LANGUAGE OF SURFACE MIXING

For those less familiar with this mixing language, a common notation when
talking about surface mixing is master/slave. Using this notation I find it
easier to think about what I want my glider to do and what surfaces need to be
involved.

In your radio you might have a "landing mix". This describes the purpose of
the mix but not what it does. In fact this is flap to elevator mixing where
flaps are the master. As the flaps move, the elevator moves as a slave.
Typically the more flap applied the more the elevator moves according to the
instructions you put in the mix in the radio. The goal is to get the ratio right
so the glider does not dive or balloon and stall when you apply flaps.
If you fly a RES glider you can use the flap to elevator mix to manage the
spoiler to elevator mixing. It serves the same purpose but typically the
elevator goes up with spoilers and down with flaps. In my radio I put in
positive or negative percentages to direct the surfaces up or down as I require.
Yours might be different.

Sometimes, such as the crow/butterfly mix, there can be a master and two
slaves. In crow the flaps are the master. Ailerons and elevator follow according
to how you have set up the mix. This could be properly called flap to aileron
and elevator mixing.

If you have full trailing edge camber control on your radio then, again,
this can be thought of as a master/slave/slave mix. Your input is to the flaps,
the ailerons and the elevator follow.
The only difference between the crow mix (f/a/e) and a camber mix (f/a/e)
is that in crow the flaps and ailerons move in the opposite directions. In
camber mixing flaps and ailerons move in the same direction. In both you would
likely set up some kind of elevator compensation, elevator as a slave. But
essentially it is the same mix used in different ways.

In most sailplane radios they would be listed as different mixes for
convenience sake. This allows you to control them differently.
Variable mixes – These are mixes that are controlled from a stick, a
slider, a dial or some other variable control. For example I have my landing
mix on the left stick. This gives me the ability to vary the mix using a
variable control, the left stick for example.

Offset mixes – These are typically operated from switches that move
a surface to a preset point. I have my camber controls on switches. I have
launch (winch/hi-start), neutral or cruise, reflex or speed and thermal camber
offset mixes. They are all just variations of the same mix but each is
controlled by a different switch, moving to a different preset and used at
different times in my flight. Each one moves the trailing edge to a preset
offset that may also have a corresponding change in elevator position. I would
not have thermal, speed or launch on at the same time. And I would not typically
have any of those on when I am using my landing mix.

Whether you have your mixes set up as variable or offset is a matter of the
capability of your radio and your person preference. I can do either on my
Futaba 9C Super. You can see my preferences. You may prefer to do them
differently, assuming your radio will let you do them differently.
Mixes can be liner or follow points on a curve.

Where have you seen linear and curved before? Think of normal aileron
control as linear. As you move the stick the ailerons move in a smooth
fashion. Think of expo as non-linear since the amount of response changes along
the movement of the aileron stick range.

In linear mixes, the slave moves in direct proportion to the master. If you
plot it on a graph, line would be smooth. For example you might set up your
landing mix as 100% flaps gets 40% down elevator. once that is set, the elevator
follows in linear fashion. 50% flap would get 20% down elevator. 25% down flap
would get 10% down elevator and so on in a linear fashion.
In non-linear mixes, also called point mixes, your ratios can vary
throughout the mix. In a 3 point curve you would set three targets for the slave
and the curve might not be smooth. Some radios offer 5 point curves and I have
seen as high as 7. This gives you more control of your mixes but is more
complex to set-up.

I hope this helps those who are new to this stuff.

SERVO SET-UP USING MECHANICAL METHODS

I always recommend you get as close to the end point throws using
mechanical methods first, then
use the radio to do the fine tuning only. This video demonstrates how
moving the push rod on the servo and control horns will allow you to adjust your end points
before you go to a menu in the radio.

This gives you the best output from the servos too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v09QzKBipN8



Here is how to do aileron diff using two servos but
without using a mix on the radio

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MHrm06LkrKo
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