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Helicopter glossary of terms

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Old 05-11-2007, 01:24 AM
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s_mcflurry
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Default Helicopter glossary of terms

Now that I'm advancing a bit with my chopper I'd like to get a bit more into the nitty gritties. I'm running across some terms frequently that I don't really know the meaning of and I'm hoping you can shed some light...

The first one is head speed. The best I can gather is that "head speed" and "rotor RPM" are the same. Just wanna make sure I have this right.

Another is 370 main motor. I know this is referring to the size of the motor and that there are different sizes (like 380 for my Axe), but what's this a measure of and how many different sizes are there?

Lastly (for now), are .60 and .30 helicopter sizes. Is this a ratio of some sort? 60% scale of the real thing? 1/60th of the real thing? Does this refer to both nitro and electric helicopters? What would my Axe be classified as (or is it just a mini)?

That's all I have for now...any help would be great! Thanks in advance.
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Old 05-11-2007, 03:52 AM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

#1 yup
#2 honestly not sure what it measures, but maybe how big it is around. There are a ton of different sizes.
#3 .30 or .60 is the motor size in Cubic inches. Electric are usually rated like 300, 450 or 600 sized and is really a completely different rating scale all together.

http://www.heliguy.com/nexus/glossary.html

that should do it for ya =)
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Old 05-11-2007, 01:40 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

Thanks for the reply, mrasmm. I actually got the title of this thread right after reading the link you gave me! haha...

I just thought of another one: What's 3-in-1? I'm assuming this is referring to the mixer that has ESC, Gyro, and some other thingy on one board. If so, what's the fourth thing in 4-in-1? Is there a such thing as a 2-in-1 or a 1-in-1 (which I'm assuming would be referred to as "1" or just the name of the board)?

Thanks!
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Old 05-11-2007, 02:22 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

3-in-1 would be a thing that plugs into a receiver and has a gyro, a main motor esc and tail motor esc. 4-in-1's have that and the receiver in it too.
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Old 05-11-2007, 06:27 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

yeah, no prob. yeah, a 3 in 1 has the two ESC's, a gyro and what's called a mixer that controls the proportion of the tail motor spinning to the main motor. Usually the tail spins about 6 times faster than the main rotor. The 4 in 1 is just like kevin already explained =)

the 2 in 1 has the 2 ESC's, one for the main motor and the tail, and it also has a mixer in it. You're right about the 1 in 1. It's just called whatever it is.
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Old 05-11-2007, 06:29 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

I believe the 370 or 380 is referring to the motor's can length. Usually the longer the can the more powerful the motor.

Electric heli 's are usually classed by motor sizes; 300 series, 400 series, and 600 series.

This is mostly for brushed motors classification although it's sometimes used for brushless too. Brushless motors seemed to be classed more on amps or watts.
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Old 05-11-2007, 06:33 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

someone was saying that the number on the brushless is how many times it is rated to spin for every volt it has. IE 4100kv spins 4100rpm for every volt you give it, so if you were running a 3s lipo on it then it would run about 45510 rpm with nominal voltage and no load =)

good call on the motor size =)
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Old 05-11-2007, 07:08 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

Someday maybe they will standarize motor ratings so you can compare apples to apples.
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Old 05-11-2007, 07:14 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

About brushless motors, from [link=http://www.rctoys.com/rc-products-catalog/RC-PARTS-BRUSHLESS-MOTORS.html]Dragan Fly Innovations, Inc.[/link]:
Quote:
RPM, Kv, And Current Rating:
RPM stands for the number of rotations per minute, and signifies how fast a motor spins. Brushless motors are given a Kv rating, which is RPM per volt, that lets you determine how fast that motor will rotate with a given voltage supplied to it. A 980Kv motor powered by an 11.1V battery would spin at 980 x 11.1 = 10878 RPM with no load. The current rating specifies the maximum continuous and/or burst current that the motor is able to handle. When selecting a battery and speed control, choose ones with continuous current ratings equal to or greater that that of the motor.
mrasmm pointed to left field and called that one out. Nice. Yet another mystery solved.
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Old 05-14-2007, 12:35 AM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

Hi, I'm back. What is glow? As in glow plug, glow engine, glow model. Is it a brand? Is it a professional wrestling promotion on the comeback trail? Does it serve also as a night light? Thanks again.
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Old 05-14-2007, 12:40 AM
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Quote:
ORIGINAL: s_mcflurry

Hi, I'm back. What is glow? As in glow plug, glow engine, glow model. Is it a brand? Is it a professional wrestling promotion on the comeback trail? Does it serve also as a night light? Thanks again.

lol there ya go =P

glow motors are basically nitro powered. They use a glow plug to start the process and then spontanious combustion to keep the motor going rather than a magneto and a spark plug to run. Diesel is also glow powered, but I don't think you'll find much of that in RC.
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Old 05-14-2007, 01:14 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

Ah, so kind of like a spark plug in a car engine? I've noticed all helicopter descriptions make it a point to mention that the engine is glow powered, is there then an alternative to glow plugs that no one seems to be using?
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Old 05-14-2007, 02:24 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

Quote:
is there then an alternative to glow plugs that no one seems to be using?
Well, there are electrics, and there are gassers. Given the start of the topic, I beleive electrics need no description. Gassers are helicopters about the size of a 90 sized glow heli or bigger that run on gasoline and oil mix. Similar to what you would feed your chainsaw, or weedeater. Similar engine too.

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Old 05-14-2007, 06:49 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

yeah, hydrogen fuel cell powered helis or hey, what about a hybrid heli that can get some of the energy back from the auto rotations or something or even solar power

hehe j/k I just had to do it =P

your q was a good q, and the answer you are looking for is above [8D]
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Old 05-16-2007, 04:55 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

Okay, so we are talking about the 3 and 4-1's, But I'm afriad I dont know what ESC or tx mean.
I have a CP and a CX2, which do those have? I'm not near my helis right now, or i'd check.
Thanks, There are a lot of terms out there that arent expressely mentioned or explained.
-Gene
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Old 05-16-2007, 05:50 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

From Wikipedia: "An electronic speed control or ESC is a device mounted onboard an electrically powered radio control model in order to vary its drive motor's speed, its direction and even to act as a dynamic brake in certain controllers." I think I kind of understand it but need to read up a bit more on it. [[link=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_speed_controller]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_speed_controller[/link]]

Tx is transmitter and that's the controller thing that you're holding. Related to this is Rx, which is receiver, I believe, and that's the thing that's receiving the signal from the Tx that's on your chopper's electronic board.

I'm pretty sure (someone correct me if I'm wrong) the CP and the CX2 will have all the above.
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Old 05-16-2007, 06:56 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

Hmmm.... So what about gas turbine? They make turbines with power takeoffs (more for turbo-prob I would imagine). Engines only rum about $3000. Imagine that on a $200 Axe or Blade!
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Old 05-18-2007, 01:44 PM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

Hi,
I,ve seen a turbine powered Raptor flying. A guy here in Northern Ireland has one and boy can it go.
Really cool to watch it start and spool up.(autostart turbine)
The exhausts point backwards, so he says it needs to hover slightly nose high due to the thrust wanting to push it forward.
I think I just started to drool all over the keyboard.
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Old 05-19-2007, 01:09 AM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

I learned another one today: BEC - Battery Eliminator Circuit.

From [link=http://www.fxaeromodels.com/product_info.php?cPath=203&products_id=3156]FXAeromodels[/link]:
"An electric helicopter has a large battery which powers the main motor. The voltage of this main motor battery is typically higher than can be used by the receiver and servos which normally require 4.8 volts. The BEC lowers the voltage of the main battery pack to 4.8 volts to power the receiver, gyro, and servos, eliminating the need for a separate 4.8 volt receiver pack."
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Old 05-19-2007, 01:13 AM
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Default RE: Helicopter glossary of terms

here is also another heli glossary
http://www.horizonhobby.com/Support/.../Glossary.aspx
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